FSP Dagger Pros pack 650W into petite SFX PSUs

Have you ever built a small-form-factor PC, reader? One of the major constraining factors for chassis dimensions is the relatively-enormous ATX power supply. There are smaller form factors, sure, but it can be hard to find good-quality SFX or TFX power supplies with sufficient power for an enthusiast (read: gaming) PC. Fortunately, times are changing, and I present exhibit A for my argument: FSP Group’s new Dagger Pro 550W and 650W SFX power supplies.

I suspect I don’t need to introduce FSP Group to an audience of gerbils, but if anyone unfamiliar is reading this, know that the company is a Voltron-like assemblage of power supply makers including Fortron/Source Corp and Sparkle Power. FSP is known for selling consistently high-quality power supply units, and the Dagger Pros don’t look to change that.

For starters, both Dagger Pro units are 80 Plus Gold-certified, meaning they’ll never drop below 90% efficiency while under a 50% load. They’re also fully-modular and semi-fanless, so the fan cuts off under low load. These PSUs are designed around a single +12V rail, and because they’re based on FSP’s “MIA IC” system, all of the usual protections (like over-current, over-voltage, over-temperature, short circuit, and over-power) come standard.

The only difference in the two models beyond the 650W version’s higher peak load rating is the presence of an 8-pin PCIe power connector that isn’t there on the 550W model. However, both units still come with a pair of 6+2-pin connectors, so virtually any single-GPU rig should be set up. Most machines built with SFX power supplies use Mini-ITX motherboards with only a single PCIe slot, but even still, FSP includes a bracket to mount these SFX units to ATX chassis.

If these power supplies look like exactly what your new system needs, you can already pick them up—just be prepared to pay for the privilege of their puny proportions. The Dagger Pro 550W is available on Newegg for $125, while the 650W model will run you $10 more at $135.

Comments
    • EndlessWaves
    • 1 month ago

    It’s a shame they’ve glued all the wires in the cables together. I’m sure it makes it neater for big display cases but it makes it harder to route through small cases.

    Reply
      • zgirl
      • 1 month ago

      This! I had to buy custom cables when I build my last box in a Ncase M1.

      Reply
      • continuum
      • 1 month ago

      Just to nitpick, it’s a ribbon cable. They’re manufactured (extruded? coated?) that way, they’re not individual wired glued together. Gluing individual wires would be crazy. 😛 😛

      Reply
      • Waco
      • 1 month ago

      It’s actually pretty easy to split the individual wires apart. I’ve done it for small cases, the best way to make them look nice is to split them, pull the pins from the plug on one end (mark where they go!), and braid them together or sleeve them.

      Reply
    • ronch
    • 1 month ago

    I’ve been out of the loop when it comes to power supplies for a while and I haven’t built a PC for so long. I’m still using my Cooler Master GX650, and I got the revised version (made by Enhance, not Seventeam), so it’s been good enough. I’ve had an affinity for FSP though. Probably not the best PSU maker but I reckon they’re ok. If I were building though, which brands these days are recommendable and not too pricey?

    Reply
      • curtisb
      • 1 month ago

      I personally stick with Seasonic power supplies.

      Reply
    • JustAnEngineer
    • 1 month ago

    Silverstone has been my go-to brand in the SFX form factor:
    [url<]https://www.silverstonetek.com/product_power.php?bno=22&tb=14&area=en[/url<] SeaSonic offers just four models: [url<]https://seasonic.com/consumer?form_factor=148[/url<]

    Reply
      • Redocbew
      • 1 month ago

      Yeah, good SFX power supplies are typically hard to find unless you know where to look especially in the >600 watt range. They can be pretty nifty in a SFF build where space is at a premium.

      Reply
      • Spunjji
      • 1 month ago

      Those Seasonic units appear to be SFX-L, too :/

      Reply

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