Alienware sets release for its 55″ OLED AW5520QF gaming display

Do you want to sit seven feet back from your gaming display? Alienware thinks you might, but you’d better have a lot of cash to burn, because the company’s upcoming AW5520QF display is going to set you back $3,999 when it hits shelves on September 30.

That’s a lot to pay, but then the Alienware AW5520QF is different from most other displays calling themselves gaming hardware on the market. While most displays are usually IPS, TN, or VA, the AQ5520QF is an OLED panel, which already cranks the price up to obscene levels all on its own. But this is an OLED panel with PC monitor specs. When we talk about OLED displays, they’re usually much smaller in part because they are so expensive.

Let’s check those specs

Alienware AW5520QF

This 3840×2160 panel on the AW5520QF boasts a 0.5-ms response time and a 120Hz refresh rate, and features AMD’s FreeSync tech. It can display a solid 98.5% of the DCI-P3 color gamut, meaning that it should handle content creation deftly, too. Alienware says the monitor offers a native contrast of 130,000:1, a result of this being an OLED panel with the ability to simply turn pixels off completely when it’s time to display black. OLED displays are often given specs like “infinite contrast,” so take that number with a grain of salt.

On the back and bottom of the panel, you’ll find a single DisplayPort 1.2 port, three HDMI 2.0 ports, four USB ports, an S/PDIF port, and headphone jacks, and a pair of 14-watt speakers. And of course, because it’s 2019, there’s RGB lighting on the back in the form of a light bar and an Alienware logo. Popping the back panel off reveals a surprisingly detailed cable-management system that ensures everything comes out the bottom of the display in one clean group, as well as a VESA mount.

What’s the Alienware AW5520QF missing, though?

Alienware AW5520QF

Despite this being an impressive monitor in some ways, it’s lacking in others when taking the price into consideration. If I’m going to spend $4,000 on a monitor right now (I’m not), I would expect things like HDR compatibility, FreeSync 2 and DisplayPort 1.4. It also tops out at only 400 nits brightness. I could see the same monitor hitting next year with HDMI 2.1 and all the other bells and whistles this one seems to be missing; HDR-10, DolbyVision, and maybe even G-Sync. At this price, it’s hard not to zero in on those stats.

But if you need an absolutely massive screen for your gaming rig, Alienware has an answer for you in the AW5520QF. You might just need pockets deep enough to fit your whole arm to be able to afford it.

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gamerk2
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gamerk2

Stupid question: Why get this over something like a LG OLED C9 series TV, which supports HDR10 and HDMI 2.1 (including HDMI VRR) to boot? Honestly, this is about $2000 overpriced.

CityZen
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CityZen

Why sit far away? Sit close and enjoy a wide field of view!

Nater
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Nater

Making an OLED display specifically for gaming seems weird to me.

“Lets market this display to consumers that are going to do a hobby 24/7 that always has constant static images.”

Have fun with all the burn-in complaints Alienware.

Neutronbeam
Guest

Dang. Saturday I already gave my wife the money for the first two years of my son’s college. If I’d just waited….

Sweatshopking
Editor

Damn kids

Neutronbeam
Guest

You got that right. I tried to ship him off to work in a Thailand factory to earn his keep, but apparently there are these annoying things called “laws” that prevent that.

Waco
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Waco

…and no VESA mount. Sigh. It’s a standard on all large TV displays and most good monitors. It’s sorely lacking from every freakin’ “gaming” display.

Krogoth
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Krogoth

Intended market for these monitors don’t care for VESA mounts (*cough* gaming eCelebrities *cough*). There is already a decent selection of large screen, 4K+ monitors for professional needs that do incorporate VESA mounts.

Waco
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Waco

I’m the intended market (and I know there are many like myself) with wall-mounted monitors to avoid the inevitable desk shaking and to gain back all of that desk area.

I don’t want a “pro” monitor, I want a high-refresh 4K gaming display at 40″+ that I can mount to the wall just like the one I already have.

Sweatshopking
Editor

i want that too, with all the hdr and other nonsense and i’d like to buy it for a song. not being sarcastic. i want cheap

Krogoth
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Krogoth

Nope, it sounds like you are totally a niche and not the intended target for this monitor.

Waco
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Waco

A niche with a bigger market than what you think the intended market of this monitor is.

Got it.

K-L-Waster
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K-L-Waster

To be fair, this thing is big enough (and likely heavy enough) that most VESA arms wouldn’t hold it anyway.

AJ Peck
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AJ Peck

Wall-mount? My wife’s 3 monitors are all wall-mounted with swing-arm mounts.

Waco
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Waco

Exactly. Wall-mount arms come in every shape, size, and weight rating needed.

Krogoth
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Krogoth

It is easy to explain why G-Sync is missing.

G-Sync 1.0 hits a hard bandwidth wall at 3840×2160 and beyond under higher frame rates. That’s partly why Nvidia started to implement VESA’s adaptive sync spec on their desktop chips.

G-Sync is going to be shifting towards being a brand name that certifies gaming monitors for the optimal experience.

psuedonymous
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psuedonymous

The limit is not from the G-sync module, but from then interconnect (HBR3 bandwidth limit). You can bet that if Nvidia implemented some custom DP1.4 variant there would have been a wailing and gnashing of teeth.

Krogoth
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Krogoth

The module has a thermal/power consumption limit if it is intended to rely on passive cooling.

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