National Catfish Day Shortbread

PC hardware, computing, and RGB LEDs

  1. Asus ROG Zephyrus S GX701GX review @ bit-tech
  2. Colorful iGame GeForce GTX 1660 Ti Advanced OC review @ Guru3D
  3. Corsair One i140 and i160 (2019) review (3440×1440 120hz gaming) @ KitGuru
  4. Thermaltake Level 20 RGB Titanium Edition gaming keyboard review @ Legit Reviews
  5. Logitech G MX518 (Legendary) review @ TechPowerUp
  6. The Chuwi AeroBook review @ AnandTech
  7. Team Group XCalibur Phantom Gaming RGB 16GB DDR4-3200 review @ Hexus

Games, culture, and VR

  1. In Japan, it’s a riveting TV plot: can a worker go home on time? @ Slashdot
  2. Evil Genius 2 wants to feed the sharks, not jump them @ Rock Paper Shotgun
  3. It’s possible to build a Turing machine within Magic: The Gathering @ Ars Technica
  4. Pink Floyd’s Dave Gilmour sells $21.5 million guitar collection and donates proceeds to fight global warming @ New Atlas

Hacks, gadgets and crypto-jinks

  1. Weird whale skull confirmed to be from only known narwhal/beluga hybrid @ New Atlas
  2. Amazon Echo Show 5 review: an Alexa display with alarm clock smarts @ Engadget
  3. Bill Gates calls failure to fight Android his “greatest mistake” @ Ars Technica (yep)

Science, technology, and space news

  1. Americans aren’t interested in the Moon and Mars—and that’s understandable @ Ars Technica
  2. Debunked: The absurd story about smartphones causing kids to sprout horns @ Ars Technica
  3. Curiosity rover detects unusual spikes of methane on Mars @ New Atlas
  4. USB inventor regrets making them so difficult to plug in correctly @ Slashdot
  5. Bezos says Blue Origin will one day refuel its lunar lander with ice from the Moon @ Slashdot
  6. The Falcon Heavy rocket launched early Tuesday—two cores made it back safely @ Ars Technica (and they caught a fairing!)

Cheese, memes, what have you

  1. Does the cheese grater do a great grate of cheese? @ HackADay
  2. The cheese grater in Fusion 360 @ HackADay
drfish

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments
    • SonicSilicon
    • 3 weeks ago

    In the article on the hybrid narwhal-beluga, it’s referred toa as a “narluga.” Having been sired by a beluga, and birthed by a narwhal, shouldn’t it be named a “belwhal?” (I’m basing this on the precedent of already named ligers and tigons.)

    Reply
    • Mr Bill
    • 3 weeks ago

    I’ve got an American Standard HSS Black Strat maple fingerboard but I’ll never be able to play like Dave Gilmour.

    Reply
      • BIF
      • 3 weeks ago

      That’s nothing. I have a fake Strat because I’m a fake guitar player and it seemed apropos at the time. Still does, actually.

      My “StrataFaux” is a “partscaster” that doesn’t try to pass itself off as a real Fender. Or a real anything, really (no, really!). No stickers, a watercolor paint job, nothing to make you think it’s actually a Fender. Really, it’s just a tree-based fakeness all rolled up in a real and honest fakery, kind of in a “keeping it real” kind of way. But then again not “really”. 😛

      It also has a dodgy trem block and a few frets that are out of tune (I call those my fake threats, I mean frets), so at least it’s not pretentious in any way. And what Strat have you ever had that could hold its pitch with a whammy bar and no locking nut, huh?

      Hmmm, maybe with “only” a few frets out of tune, it may be more authentic than the real thing? Well, maybe more authentic than some of the Squiers in their brand new Christmas morning “beginner kit” boxes, yeah?

      I’m thinking of using MIDI to route to a VST with samples that are actually in tune. I could probably do that cheaper than actually getting my “StrataFaux” properly fixed by a real luthier. And for sure, I’ll substitute ukulele samples when I’m feeling down.

      I however, am still a fake guitar player, because even if I do all that, I may still be better off with the RealGuitar instruments and a midi keyboard!

      At least I know my place in the world, and at least I know the difference between Major and Minor. No fakin’!
      😉

      Reply
        • Mr Bill
        • 3 weeks ago

        LOL, I have one of those; its a Peavy. My brother is the one with the talent in the family and he talked me in to buying the Strat.

        Reply
    • Mr Bill
    • 3 weeks ago

    A magic deck as a Turing Machine, that’s darned cool.

    Reply
    • blastdoor
    • 3 weeks ago

    [quote<]https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/06/americans-arent-interested-in-the-moon-and-mars-and-thats-understandable/[/quote<] I agree that it's premature to try and put people on the moon or mars. Instead, I like the idea of sending probes to nearby star systems that appear to have planets with a chance of supporting life. If we can find a planet where humans can survive (ideally thrive) without being encased in spacesuits, domes, or living in caves, then it will make sense to send humans into space. Basically, we need to find a planet that is to us what North America was to European explorers --- a place where we can get off the ship and live off the land. Otherwise it's just not worth it. Yes, it will take decades, maybe centuries, before we can find such a place, let alone send someone there. But realistically, that's what we need to do. We are seriously kidding ourselves if we think that human settlement of Mars is a path to ensuring our survival as a species. If anything, it's a distraction.

    Reply
      • Redocbew
      • 3 weeks ago

      I have a hard time believing this poll, or any of the other stuff surrounding this story is worth taking seriously, but if there is some kind of extinction event that happened here on a planetary scale, then chances are being on the moon isn’t going to be a great alternative. Being on Mars might be better though.

      In any case, we’re going to need a new class of engines before sending people anywhere beyond Mars is doable.

      Reply
        • blastdoor
        • 3 weeks ago

        What kind of extinction event would make the Earth worse than Mars? I’d rather try living in the Sahara desert, the bottom of the ocean, or in Antarctica before trying to live on Mars. What’s going to make the whole planet worse than those alternatives?

        I think people have a romantic attachment to this stuff that makes them switch their brains off.

        Reply
          • Redocbew
          • 3 weeks ago

          A supervolcano eruption, or a mega-asteroid strike could mess things up for long enough to cause us a serious problem. If we’re speculating about what it would take to set up a colony on Mars though, then we might as well speculate it being far enough in the future to have terraformed it, or at least set up some kind of sustainable shelters. If this Very Bad Thing happens before that, then we’re screwed anyway. The odds of us surviving long term in space without a planet to live on are probably just as bad as if we didn’t go anywhere at all.

          Reply
            • blastdoor
            • 3 weeks ago

            Those things would certainly be bad, but I still think earth would be more attractive than mars even after those events. Mars really sucks.

            • Redocbew
            • 3 weeks ago

            It sucks now, sure, but nobody is talking about living there now(I realize there’s politicians involved here, so maybe I should say that no one who we might trust is saying that). There’s that, and the problems of living on Mars are problems that should be fixable.

            However, the nearest exoplanet that we currently know of is just over four light years away. If it’s four light years away, then it might as well be four hundred light years away, or four thousand, or four million. We’re not getting there without the kind of breakthrough that happens only once every few hundred years.

            If some Very Bad Thing did happen, and leaving Earth became mandatory, then either we wait for that breakthough, we wait for someone to find this perfect planet of yours somewhere “nearby” that nobody has ever seen before, or we go to Mars. I don’t see how those first two look any better to you than just staying put.

            • blastdoor
            • 3 weeks ago

            Four light years is vastly better than 400 or 4000. Traveling at 1/10 the speed of light, a probe could travel four light years in 40 years. Add another four years for signals to return.

            We do not currently have the ability to send such a probe, but I bet that it could be possible with in my lifetime ( I am a bit under 50), especially if we stop wasting resources on silly moon/Mars aspirations.

            Of course, the first probe probably will not find an inhabitable planet. We would probably have to send several probes to several systems, and all together, it could take centuries before we find a suitable place. But I think it’s worth looking because finding such a place would vastly increase the life expectancy of the human race.

            • K-L-Waster
            • 3 weeks ago

            It might be possible to send a *probe* to Alpha Cen or Barnard’s Star in our lifetimes, but it sure the heck isn’t going to be possible to send a *person*, let alone lots of same.

            While we’re looking for an out-of-system planet to move to, we’re also going to have to work out how to get substantial numbers of people there and have them be able to survive there on a permanent basis. The moon and Mars seem like excellent places to learn how to do that: far enough to be hard but not so far that we can’t attempt to fix things when unintended events occur (which they will).

          • etana
          • 3 weeks ago

          gravitonium accident with subsequent kree invasion

          Reply
      • Voldenuit
      • 3 weeks ago

      So, living in a dome on Mars is too hard, but it’s easy peasy to live in a spaceship for hundreds of years, with strict energy and resource recycling, cosmic radiation, micrometeorites, and then arriving at a planet that may be the right distance from its star to have liquid water, but will most likely have organic compounds and biology completely incompatible with Earth life for food, air, water and biological proceses?

      Maybe Joseph Smith might think humans came from planet Cobol, but there’s nothing trivial about colonizing a planet, especially one with extant life.

      Reply
        • blastdoor
        • 3 weeks ago

        Like I said, it is only worth going if you can live off the land upon arrival. Otherwise, no point in going.

        I certainly did not say that it is easy to get there, but at least there would be a point. Mars is utterly pointless.

        People need to get it through their heads that the human race is completely dependent on this planet for the next couple of centuries. There are no plan B’s in this solar system.

        Reply
          • K-L-Waster
          • 3 weeks ago

          I think you’re dreaming in technicolor if you think we’re going to find an exoplanet with conditions so similar to Earth that you could walk out of the landing craft without a space suit. Between temperature, pressure, gas mixture, and exo-planet biochemistry, the deck is heavily stacked against you.

          Reply
      • Blytz
      • 3 weeks ago

      Given most Americans can’t find the moon or mars in a map of the solar system…

      Reply
    • mganai
    • 3 weeks ago

    Would have preferred Windows over Android as prime iOS competitor.

    Reply
      • Mr Bill
      • 3 weeks ago

      Windows does too many things to be a phone OS. But I never had a Windows phone so maybe you have a point.

      Reply
    • Srsly_Bro
    • 3 weeks ago

    I clicked thorough to the Japan article. On the other side within a few replies it turned into people arguing about American politics. There has to be an algorithm that shows no matter the topic, it will quickly turn to politics.

    Reply
      • euricog
      • 3 weeks ago

      Well, if everything in our world is managed by our politicians, it is inevitable that almost every topic turns into politics. And because USA is the country whose actions have more impact to the rest of the world, it is almost inevitable that non-US topics turn to US politics.

      Reply
        • Srsly_Bro
        • 3 weeks ago

        Well, if everything is controlled by the weather, and weather patterns in one area may impact the weather in another area, it is almost inevitable that people will talk about the weather.

        I can do it too, bro.

        Reply
      • Spunjji
      • 3 weeks ago

      Slashdot comments appear to be under a sustained assault from some very motivated “trolls” and their various sockpuppets. They’ll steer any non-political topic in that direction, and they’ll sealion any genuinely political topic to death.

      Reply
    • Redocbew
    • 3 weeks ago

    [quote<]Amazon Echo Show 5 review: an Alexa display with alarm clock smarts [/quote<] Smells fishy to me...

    Reply
    • thedosbox
    • 3 weeks ago

    [quote<]These guys know what's up.[/quote<] Cats love drfish.

    Reply
    • blastdoor
    • 3 weeks ago

    Interesting that Gates is taking the blame for losing to Android, given that he hadn’t been CEO for quite a few years at that time. But I imagine he remained (and perhaps remains) pretty vocal about what MS is doing, so maybe he really does bear some responsibility? Or is this just a swipe at Ballmer?

    In any event, Yeah — it was a massive screw up. Intel made a similar screw up. Wintel could certainly have owned mobile in the way they own the PC. I guess we’ll never know *why* they dropped the ball, but my guess is that the beancounters’ market segmentation strategies at both companies prevented them from competing on price with the combination of Android and ARM. That is, I wonder if they were afraid that if they made a smartphone that was TOO good at TOO low a price, people might plug it into a monitor with keyboard and mouse and then OH NOES — monopoly PC profits are gone!

    Reply
      • oldog
      • 3 weeks ago

      So what ever happened to Digital Equipment Corporation?

      Reply
        • blastdoor
        • 3 weeks ago

        Wasn’t it bought by Compaq, which was then bought by HP?

        Also, didn’t VMS tech -> Win NT
        and Alpha tech -> Athlon / Apple A chips?

        Reply
      • frenchy2k1
      • 3 weeks ago

      Intel was afraid of a combination of things:
      – their mobile processor needed to be x86
      – they had to compete on price in that market (as the other competitors were quite cheap with reasonable perfs)
      – people would use the resulting processor in laptops

      This is what was giving intel nightmares, selling mobile processors so good that they could end up in a laptop, earning them $50 instead of $300+.

      Of course, now, their inaction propped up their own, renewed competition.
      We can see that with Apple planning to ditch intel and use their own ARM cpu in their laptops and Qualcom creating processors for always connected laptops.

      They traded short term gains for long term pains and this *never* ends well for companies.

      Once, intel was the cheaper alternative for servers (compared to the RISC behemoths like IBM and SUN). Look how it ended…
      Cheaper companies are usually setup with a more efficient infrastructure. As they catch up and technology improves, they can go up the chain (as perfs get “good enough”).
      This is where we are with CPUs. A phone/tablet is now “good enough” for most of the population (typical usage of email/apps/web/video).

      Reply
        • blastdoor
        • 3 weeks ago

        Exactly my thoughts, but you said it better/clearer.

        Reply
      • Mr Bill
      • 3 weeks ago

      I don’t think the other players realized what a huge home run the iPhone would turn out to be. And that people would pay ridiculous money to have them. After that success, the price of entry went way up. Only Google was willing to blow enough money to make a competing platform.

      Reply
        • oldog
        • 3 weeks ago

        Well Eric Schmidt certainly did, but he had a bird’s eye view of the iPhone development while on the board of Apple.

        In Walter Isaacson’s official biography of Steve Jobs, Jobs called Android ‘grand theft’ and threatened Google with ‘thermonuclear war’.

        Reply
          • blastdoor
          • 3 weeks ago

          Yes, but Apple mostly lost that patent war.

          I think if I were at Apple, the lesson I would’ve learned from that experience is that the type of design innovation that Apple brings to the table is not the type that can be protected with patents. Of course, you still have to apply for pattens for defensive purposes. But using patents to keep competitors from copying design ideas really has not worked. I intend no commentary on whether it should work – – I am simply observing that as a practical matter it does not work.

          Yet, we also see that Apple does not need it to work. They are a reasonably successful company.

          My free advice to Apple is – – stick to your knitting. Just keep working hard to turn out good products. The ability to consistently do that is not something that is easily copied.

          Reply
    • JustAnEngineer
    • 3 weeks ago

    Those trawlers aren’t catching any catfish.
    [url<]https://images.app.goo.gl/fwqohzxvjs7anU4MA[/url<]

    Reply
    • chuckula
    • 3 weeks ago

    [quote<]Does the cheese grater do a great grate of cheese? @ HackADay[/quote<] Unless your cheese grater has a starting price of $6000 it can't be insanely grate.

    Reply
      • euricog
      • 3 weeks ago

      Don’t forget the $4,999 cheese board and its $999 stand.

      Reply
        • Redocbew
        • 3 weeks ago

        I’ll make you a cheese board for $3000 that’s just as good as that one.

        Reply
          • euricog
          • 3 weeks ago

          Does it have a 6K Ricotta display?

          Reply

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