National Handshake Day Shortbread

PC hardware, computing, and RGB LEDs

  1. Scythe Mugen 5 TUF Gaming Alliance CPU cooler review @ PC Perspective
  2. Cooler Master MasterBox Q500L review @ Guru3D
  3. Corsair Nightsword RGB mouse review @ Hexus
  4. Samsung SSD 970 EVO Plus 2TB review @ HotHardware
  5. AverMedia Live GC311 Live Gamer Mini capture card @ KitGuru
  6. Bitfenix Enso Mesh review @ TechPowerUp
  7. The Kingston DC500 series Enterprise SATA SSDs review @ AnandTech

Games, culture, and VR

  1. Cease-and-desist transforms Mario Royale into DMCA Royale @ Ars Technica
  2. Dozens said PUBG needed a plot, so they’re getting one @ Quarter To Three
  3. Wolfenstein: Youngblood will feature uncensored Nazi imagery in Germany, a series first @ Nintendo Life
  4. YouTube looks to demonetization as punishments for major creators, but it doesn’t work @ Slashdot

Hacks, gadgets and crypto-jinks

  1. Bitcoin soars past $12,500 five days after hitting $10,000 @ Ars Technica
  2. Smartphones and fitness trackers used to gauge employee performance @ New Atlas
  3. Researchers demonstrate how US emergency alert system can be hijacked and weaponized @ Slashdot

Science, technology, and space news

  1. Boeing Starliner completes last and most difficult parachute test @ New Atlas
  2. VESA publishes DisplayPort 2.0 video standard, offers support for beyond-8K resolutions and higher refresh Rates for 4K/HDR @ Slashdot
  3. Europe says SpaceX “dominating” launch, vows to develop Falcon 9-like rocket @ Ars Technica

Cheese, memes, what have you

  1. Coscto’s 2 lb cheese flight is the stuff book club dreams are made of @ bustle.com
  2. The cheese flavoured by wind @ bbc.com
drfish

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments
    • BIF
    • 3 weeks ago

    Excellent picture and caption for this one.

    But why would cats want to shake hands with a dog?

    Oh wait, now I get it… 😛

    Reply
    • anotherengineer
    • 3 weeks ago

    Fish

    Comment under photo should have been from the dog

    hey you have 2 tone hair just like me 🙂

    Reply
    • CScottG
    • 3 weeks ago

    Stock photo:

    p-aw(w)..

    Reply
    • oldog
    • 3 weeks ago

    This seemed like the big tech news today.

    [url<]https://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-tried-to-stop-china-acquiring-world-class-chips-china-got-them-anyway-11561646798?mod=hp_lead_pos5[/url<] Not flattering for AMD or Lisa Su. This article is behind a paywall so I have excerpted the first two paragraphs: Advanced Micro Devices Inc. transformed itself from a financially struggling company to an investor’s dream in just three years, a turnaround that began with a decision to help Chinese partners develop advanced computer-chip technology. That deal may have helped save the company, but it alarmed U.S. national-security officials, who saw it as a threat to their goal to rein in China’s supercomputing industry. Last week, after years of friction, the Commerce Department issued an order that effectively bars several Chinese entities—including AMD’s partners—from obtaining American technology.

    Reply
      • chuckula
      • 3 weeks ago

      AMD seems to have taken a page from a bunch of other idiotic American corporations in the 1990s: Sell the goods to China today for short-term gain and don’t think about the long term repercussions of what happens when you give everything away to a government that doesn’t care about your long term solvency.

      Two major examples are Loral and GE, but the list is a mile along.

      Also, whoever approved that deal in the US government should be up on charges too.

      Expected downthumbs for the AMD koolaid gang. Let’s put it this way: Assume Intel is 100% guilty of the “crimes” against AMD that have been sh1tposted as “fact” on here and the Internet over the last 20 years. Assuming that to be true, it’s like accusing Intel of having some unpaid parking tickets after AMD got drunk and plowed down a bunch of pedestrians with a truck. On top of that, for all the screaming and moaning about the supposed “harm” AMD has suffered due to “big mean Intel” thye haven’t seen anything compared to what the Chinese government will do.

      Reply
        • CScottG
        • 3 weeks ago

        -yes, it’s a serious problem and it has been for quite a long time now: irrespective of the Co..

        It’s also absurd that people/media sources “lump” this in with a trade “war”.

        Stuff like this (like Huewai, or routing traffic through China) is about security, that it happens to also coincide with commerce negotiations and tariffs – is simply because there is finally a US *President that is willing to do both. Past administrations were “giving it away” like a crack-whore in desperate need of a fix.

        *don’t get me wrong though, there are several things I don’t like about the administration: a big part of which is the inflated care-free cronyism of the current FCC. The NSA needs a major “re-tooling” (structure and focus) along with reasonable working laws (though protective) that are actually policed with serious penalties for violation. Both organizations have Britney Spears: “oops, I did it again.” – on a “loop”.

        Reply
        • oldog
        • 3 weeks ago

        Question. With the blessing of the US Government can Intel revoke its x86 licensing deal with AMD?

        Reply
      • anotherengineer
      • 3 weeks ago

      Probably just more spin off from
      [url<]https://www.techpowerup.com/255772/amd-takes-a-bigger-revenue-hit-than-microsoft-from-huawei-ban-goldman-sachs[/url<] I wouldn't kid yourself, most things are manufactured in China, it's only a matter of time before they reverse engineer anything/everything if they want to.

      Reply
    • anotherengineer
    • 3 weeks ago

    Smartphones and fitness trackers used to gauge employee performance

    “Among other things, it turns out that high-performing employees use their phone less, they sleep longer and deeper, plus they’re more physically active and mobile. Not surprisingly, they also spend more time at the workplace on weekends.”

    So people with no kids.

    Reply
      • blastdoor
      • 3 weeks ago

      Lucky b@sterds.

      Reply
      • Krogoth
      • 3 weeks ago

      or no social lives

      Reply
        • Voldenuit
        • 3 weeks ago

        Po-TA-to, po-TAH-to.

        Reply
      • FireGryphon
      • 3 weeks ago

      If you work on the weekends you have poor work-life balance, irrespective of having kids.

      Reply
        • blastdoor
        • 3 weeks ago

        Unless your work is your life and you happen to really enjoy your work.

        Reply
          • Redocbew
          • 3 weeks ago

          If you need to work on the weekends to support a family, or just because you need it, then that’s different.

          Unfortunately we can’t all have jobs that really make a difference where that would sort of thing would be good regardless. I’ve seen middle managers stuck in dead end jobs who are single with no kids working six or seven days a week I guess just because they like working? Something about that is just sad.

          Reply
            • Voldenuit
            • 3 weeks ago

            Are the middle managers really being “productive” if they spend the weekend charging the company managing employees who aren’t at the office?

            Or are we talking sweatshop-level crunch cycles and Corporate needs someone holding the whip on weekends?

            • Redocbew
            • 3 weeks ago

            If corporate says “do this now, or you’re done”, then that’s not really a voluntary decision to spend extra time in the office. I was talking about people who spend extra time working just because they enjoy working, I guess.

            I enjoy my work as much, or maybe more than the next guy, but spending all that time and energy devoted to a company which probably considers you to be replaceable just seems weird, and sort of depressing.

            • blastdoor
            • 3 weeks ago

            I definitely agree that the vast majority of people work for a company that basically considers employees a resource to exploit and discard. And I agree that is depressing.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 3 weeks ago

            Absolutely. I’ve taken on evening-time and weekend-time projects that are related to work because they’re fun in the past, but in recent months I’ve come to my senses.

      • GrimDanfango
      • 3 weeks ago

      This is labouring under a default assumption that “performance” is all that’s important.

      Speaking as someone in a creative industry, there’s a VERY clear inverse correlation between “performance” and “quality”… and over time it’s also become very clear to me that there’s less and less expectation of quality in the first place, and more and more expecation that a certain amount of stuff be churned out in as short a time as possible.
      It seems like the driving force behind it is likely just that most people go to watch movies packed with lots of VFX, moreso than they go to watch movies with *good* vfx.

      I’d be interested to see this kind of study track what affects the quality of people’s work.
      But I’ve no interest in hearing how I could more effectively turn myself into a mindless creative automaton to most efficiently increase someone elses share prices. I got into this line of work to create things I’m proud of, and I’ll contrive excuses to take my time and turn out quality work just so long as I can get away with it and still get paid.

      Reply
        • anotherengineer
        • 3 weeks ago

        Reminds me of a QA/QC guy I used to work with.

        He had a saying

        “why do we never have the time to do things right, but we always have the time to do things over”

        Reply
          • GrimDanfango
          • 3 weeks ago

          Yep, that rings very true with me.
          Tell them it’ll take three months, get told we have a month to do it, after 3.5 weeks it looks like arse, panic, get two week extention, try some other hack that can conceivably be done in 2 weeks, rince and repeat process until the project has taken three months, and is still a mess compared to if we’d just been given the three months I knew it’d take to do well.

          But my, I was so productive the whole time, putting in overtime and weekends I wouldn’t have needed to if we’d been given three months. I probably crammed 6 months of productivity in!

          Reply
            • anotherengineer
            • 3 weeks ago

            Indeed,

            reminds me of another quote

            it’s better to be productive than busy

            sounds more like you are describing busy, however I think a lot of people (at the top) have trouble differentiating busy from productive. (not inferring you)

            I had a really good manager once, he used to say, “go slow, to go fast”, so basically take the time to do it right and do it once.

            • HERETIC
            • 3 weeks ago

            Used to drum into apprentices-
            “Learn to do it right-Then learn to do it faster.”

          • Prestige Worldwide
          • 3 weeks ago

          “A delayed game is eventually good, but a rushed game is forever bad.”

          ― Shigeru Miyamoto

          Reply
        • davidbowser
        • 3 weeks ago

        Performance is all that’s important, but your usage is not what they are talking about in the article. You seem to be mixing messages around performance and activity, which they say are correlated, but not the same thing. If I can take a stab at your point and translate, their study would show an 80% correlation with the “quality” of employee work/product and their activity.

        If you read the source study from Dartmouth, this was done across multiple job types across industries. The [b<]performance[/b<] metric was independent and unique to the job/industry but correlated with 80% accuracy to their [b<]activity[/b<] metrics. What this means is that high/low performing IT people and high/low performing nurses are both correlated to high/low activity. edit:format

        Reply
          • Redocbew
          • 3 weeks ago

          I hope you didn’t pay the $15(or more) to download the study from the ACM, and instead you’re just talking about the press release from Dartmouth.

          Are we supposed to believe that there’s a general method of determining how good a person is at any particular job they happen to have at the moment just by measuring their vital signs and asking them a few questions? Really?

          Reply
            • Anonymous Coward
            • 3 weeks ago

            No we are not supposed to believe all that you said. We are supposed to believe that people with certain characteristics tend to be good at their jobs.

            • Redocbew
            • 3 weeks ago

            Ok, so which characteristics are those, and what does that even mean in terms of heart rate, blood pressure, and the other things that could be measured by some fitness tracker?

            The explanation seems to be that they measure a bunch of things, ask a few questions, and then “machine learning” figures it all out from there. There’s a lot of assumptions involved there, and if we don’t get all of them right, then it’s just garbage in and garbage out.

          • GrimDanfango
          • 3 weeks ago

          Well yes, I suppose what I’m saying is that ideally, quality of work and performance would indeed be largely synonymous, but in my personal experience, I don’t trust the “performance metrics” employed by management. I’ve been labelled as underperforming frequently at a particular job in the past, on projects where I would then be thanked profusely in the last few weeks for swooping in to save everyone else from their own short-sightedness, given that my stuff didn’t break days before the deadline, so I had some spare time to help fix others’ problems (people largely seen as model employees for their abilities to drum out hacky results quickly).
          My help would all be routinely forgotten the week after a deadline of course.

          I guess I’m just a bit bitter that my career seems to be a constant struggle to convey the level of effort and dedication I put into my work, which in itself is only necessary because if I don’t, it’s hard to convince anyone to just give me the time I need to work, and leave me to do a job I otherwise thoroughly enjoy.

          Thus, it tends to niggle me when I see anything boiled down to “performance”, because at the end of the day, however balanced and considered the definition sounds, the reality is it usually comes down to pure economics to the exclusion of all else, and that’s a great way to make any job miserable.

          Reply
            • Redocbew
            • 3 weeks ago

            To go one step further is this obsession people have around failure. The idea that there is some perfectly linear and perfectly efficient way to make a thing is just entirely false. Just about everyone who has built something with their own hands knows that it never turns out exactly the way you planned it at the start, and that’s usually a good thing.

            The little dead ends and hiccups you run into during the course of a project are not failures.
            Failure happens when a person doesn’t treat those things as part of the process, because that usually means they’ll overlook something that will cause a real problem.

            • Waco
            • 3 weeks ago

            Failure translates to “learning moment” in my language.

            • davidbowser
            • 3 weeks ago

            I agree with your position. The most accurate way to look at this study is that managers that subjectively grade performance are likely to grade high those that look busy (high activity). It’s crap, but it seems to be in line with what I have observed.

            As for me, I have had a few of occasions where I was recognized and given bonuses for objective metrics (revenue generating deals). At the exact same time, I have repeatedly had my bosses tell me that I needed to work harder or do more. My style is 70% incremental progress and 30% big bet projects, so being efficient on big bets makes people think it was “too easy” or that it somehow fell in my lap.

            Less than a year ago, I had someone I work with tell me they essentially put in bogus business activity (meetings on the calendar) because a boss’s-boss’s-boss type was keen on those metrics, to the point of making it mandatory and having to defend yourself if you were not up to snuff. I pointed out that it would probably end badly because people were making business decisions on bad data. As predicted that boss’s-boss’s-boss was forced out within a year of implementing that program.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 3 weeks ago

      I read it as “more physically attractive” and said “well, I’m out!”

      Reply
    • Usacomp2k3
    • 3 weeks ago

    “Coscto” How did that get by their editor? Shame on Bustle. Try Costco.

    Reply
    • Krogoth
    • 3 weeks ago

    [quote<] Bitcoin soars past $12,500 five days after hitting $10,000 @ Ars Technica[/quote<] Here comes around round of pump and dump + inflated Navi and Super RTX launch prices! Fun times for those trying to jump onto the Ryzen 3xxx bandwagon. You do need a discrete GPU unlike the vast majority of the desktop SKUs on the Intel camp.

    Reply
      • chuckula
      • 3 weeks ago

      Ryzen 3000: Now more than ever proving that discrete GPUs are DYING!

      [Funny how the exact see people who go all bobblehead agreeing with Krogoth when he copy-n-pastes that trope get all offended and butthurt when their “miraculous” Ryzen 3000 that’s purportedly a “mainstream” product can’t display notepad without a discrete GPU. Make up your minds.]

      Reply
        • jihadjoe
        • 3 weeks ago

        Welcome back!

        Reply
          • gmskking
          • 2 weeks ago

          You may not know this, but Krogoth and Chuckula are actually the same person.

          Reply
        • BIF
        • 3 weeks ago

        I never agree with Krogoth.

        Except when I do, because then I know he’s probably right.

        ;l)

        Reply
      • blastdoor
      • 3 weeks ago

      I wonder to what extent sanctions / tariffs with Iran and China help bitcoin. That is, do those barriers push people who would otherwise move dollars (or other legit currencies) across borders to use bitcoin to move money where they want it to go?

      Reply
        • Srsly_Bro
        • 3 weeks ago

        I over look the ports in Seattle from the floor I’m on. One of the docks that was completely full and had ships constantly in and out, is now empty. The other docks are busy but it is strange to see. Also, a container ship came in yesterday at a very low capacity. I’m guessing Bitcoin is a place to store money for people unsure about the stability of currencies. When things get figured out, I’m also guessing things will return to normal.

        Reply
          • The Egg
          • 3 weeks ago

          I’m a bit dense at times, but what does the traffic to/from a dock in Seattle have to do with the price of Bitcoin?

          Reply
            • Goty
            • 3 weeks ago

            I think it was more about tariffs than cryptocurrencies.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 3 weeks ago

            Perhaps some is related to reduced Chinese exports, and those at risk may see Bitcoin as a different way to store wealth while this tariff battle is going on. I’m just speculating. I’m not an economist.

            • nanoflower
            • 3 weeks ago

            Tarrifs appear to be impacting shipping hence the empty dock in Seattle that would normally be quite busy.

            Tarrifs that are impacting the economy can make people uneasy about the future.

            Uneasy people look for alternative places to put their money such as gold and possibly bitcoin.

    • chuckula
    • 3 weeks ago

    [quote<]Coscto's 2 lb cheese flight is the stuff book club dreams are made of @ bustle.com[/quote<] Review: Bought one. Did not leave the ground (in fact it weighed me down). WOULD NOT RECOMMEND.

    Reply

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