National IT Professionals Day Shortbread


That laptop has a serious cooling problem.

PC hardware, computing, and RGB LEDs

  1. The Corsair K63 Wireless mechanical keyboard review @ AnandTech
  2. Asus Crosshair VIII Impact review @ bit-tech
  3. Swiftech H240 X3 AIO review @ Guru3D
  4. Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT Nitro+ review @ Hexus
  5. Gigabyte Radeon RX 5700 XT GAMING OC review @ HotHardware
  6. Elgato 4K60 Pro Mk.2 capture card review @ KitGuru
  7. MSI Immerse GH30 gaming headset review @ Legit Reviews
  8. Phanteks Eclipse P360X review @ TechPowerUp
  9. LG 27GL850 review @ TechSpot

Games, culture, and VR

  1. Do you even Nintendo Ring Fit bro? @ Quarter To Three
  2. Inspired by Harry Potter, 150 colleges now have Quidditch teams @ Slashdot
  3. UK Parliament: ban all loot boxes until evidence proves they’re safe for kids @ Ars Technica

Hacks, gadgets and crypto-jinks

  1. AI makes hyperbolic brain hats a reality @ HackADay
  2. Over-engineered cat door makes purrfect sense @ HackADay

Science, technology, and space news

  1. Audible fires back at book publishers, says captions are fair use @ Ars Technica
  2. What it was like to fly the baddest airplane the world has ever known @ Ars Technica
  3. Disney CEO Bob Iger resigns from Apple board as companies come into conflict on streaming @ Slashdot
  4. How do you leave a warning that lasts as long as nuclear waste? @ Ars Technica (interesting thinking material here)

Cheese, memes, what have you

  1. Pizza Hut is rolling out a massive, cheese-filled ‘Stuffed Cheez-It Pizza’ @ businessinsider.com
  2. Watch a competitive eater down a whole barrel of cheese balls @ mashable.com (just a reminder that Shortbread links are not endorsements)
Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

avatar
6 Comment threads
14 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
7 Comment authors
superjawespsuedonymousK-L-WasterLironKrogoth Recent comment authors
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Liron
Guest
Liron

“Audible argues that the technology has substantial public benefits. It can help people with learning disabilities or limited hearing to better understand audiobooks. It can aid people learning a new language.”

They’re forgetting the really important public benefit. It lets us know how fantasy names and places are written so that they are easier to Google. I’ve failed so many times to figure out how to spell a name that I hear in an audio book.

superjawes
Guest
superjawes

How do you leave a warning that lasts as long as nuclear waste? @ Ars Technica (interesting thinking material here) As for this story, the solution is pretty simple…make it dangerous. Put the worst waste in the middle or at the bottom, then layer progressively less dangerous waste on or around it, so it is impossible to get the worst stuff without navigating the “less bad” stuff. It is impossible to predict exactly what life will look like in 10,000, 100,000, or 1 million years, so we have to trust that whoever or whatever finds the waste is smart enough… Read more »

Krogoth
Guest
Krogoth

Nah, just make it inaccessible to iron-age and earlier levels of technology.

superjawes
Guest
superjawes

Not a mutually exclusive idea. If they have that iron-age intelligence, then they (should) have the intelligence to realize that they’re in a dangerous situation. Even if they don’t, a significant but nonlethal radiation burn should turn them away.

And again, if they aren’t smart enough to realize that, let natural selection work.

Krogoth
Guest
Krogoth

The problem is the cold to semi-hot (half-life measured in decades to centuries) radioactive daughter products of nuclear waste. They aren’t dangerous until you have months to years worth of exposure and/or bio-accumulates through the food web.

psuedonymous
Guest
psuedonymous

Easier said than done given what iron-age civilisations accomplished (e.g. Rome).

K-L-Waster
Guest
K-L-Waster

When you’re dealing with waste with half lives in the 1,000s of years, the less dangerous stuff can still be pretty lethal for a looonggg time.

superjawes
Guest
superjawes

UK Parliament: ban all loot boxes until evidence proves they’re safe for kids @ Ars Technica

In some ways, loot boxes are very much like gambling, preying on the same feedback loops and manipulative practices to keep gamblers players putting money in the machines. In some ways, loot boxes are worse than gambling, because the reward is randomized, and you can never get a cash value back.

And because the industry has offered no answers to the problems, now governments are coming to regulate. To which I say: “We f%&*ing told you this would happen”

Krogoth
Guest
Krogoth

I think it’ll end-up being “adults only” and/or Uncle Sam is taking a nice chunk of it via regulation/taxes.

Krogoth
Guest
Krogoth

How do you leave a warning that lasts as long as nuclear waste? @ Ars Technica (interesting thinking material here

)

The easiest way is just bury it deep enough that it requires at least late-industrial to atomic-era technology to reach it. No need for fancy abstract art pieces that tries to convey the nature of radioactivity to iron age or earlier-era cultures.

K-L-Waster
Guest
K-L-Waster

A Victorian era civilization may be capable of digging that deep (they were digging coal mines that approached that depth for example) but not yet have enough understanding of radioactivity to recognize what they’re getting into until they’ve unleashed a serious catastrophe on themselves (radium was considered “safe” at that time…).

Krogoth
Guest
Krogoth

It is very unlikely they were bother to extract anything from it. The daughter products of nuclear waste are typically mid-period transition metals (can be source elsewhere in greater abundances) or actinides (no real applications outside of scientific uses/nuclear energy). They should be developing an understanding of radioactivity at that point. The entire concern is more from iron age and earlier cultures who might think that nuclear waste is some kind of treasure or holy relic(s) and end-up hoarding it.

K-L-Waster
Guest
K-L-Waster

The concern was that they would try to open it up at all and in the process kill themselves and anyone living nearby. Actually trying to use it isn’t much of a problem if the entire mining crew dies of radiation poisoning inside of a week, followed by anyone living in the general area over the following months.

superjawes
Guest
superjawes

Not to be a broken record, but this is why I say the “least” dangerous stuff should be the most accessible. Let the containment be appealing/interesting, but make sure that the discovering/mining crew encounters “minimally’ radioactive material. Enough to give some irritation/nasty short-term effects, but not quite enough to trigger ARS. Basically, you let this hypothetical civilization (or new life form) figure out radiation for themselves. That’s something they will need to do regardless, lest they discover their own deposits of radioactive minerals. Or worse, that ghost town in Ukraine. And worst case is what you describe. If a mining… Read more »

Liron
Guest
Liron

It would be interesting to think how the Victorian civilization would react to our fancy abstract art piece warnings. Would they laugh at the “primitives” who have heeded those warnings for thousands of years? Would they insist that the notion of a previous advanced civilization is completely ludicrous and the warnings have to be superstitious art from the primitives? How long would they keep insisting that it’s just a coincidence when they start dropping like flies?

K-L-Waster
Guest
K-L-Waster

Based on the examples of Victorians opening the tombs of pharaohs etc. you’re probably right.

Neutronbeam
Guest
Neutronbeam

You realize that the cat is planning to take over the world? It’s not just laying there. Soon as you leave the room it starts pounding those keys issuing commands to the feline High Command. Then it may eat you. It’s like the John Wick of cats–it’s unstoppable.

If I were you, I’d grab the largest cheese wheel in your stash and GTHO.

chuckula
Guest
chuckula

Planning? I think the takeover is complete.
It’s the cat’s world. We’re just living in it.

Krogoth
Guest
Krogoth

Intel has CATcelled “Rat Lake” as intended successor to “Ice Lake”.

Krogoth
Guest
Krogoth

If it made of warms, I sits……

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This