National Gymnastics Day Shortbread

’tis also International Talk Like A Pirate Day, but one-eyed cats be depressin’.

PC hardware, computing, and RGB LEDs

  1. ZenBook Pro Duo review @ Engadget
  2. Fractal Design Vector RS review @ Guru3D
  3. Corsair iCUE 465X RGB case review @ Gamers Nexus
  4. be quiet! Pure Base 500 review @ Hexus
  5. HP Zbook 14u G6 review @ HotHardware
  6. Fractal Design Vector RS case review @ KitGuru
  7. Lenovo Yoga C630 WOS 2-in-1 PC review @ Legit Reviews
  8. Thermaltake Level 20 RGB hard mouse pad review @ TechPowerUp
  9. Acer Predator X35 review @ TechSpot

Games, culture, AI, and VR

  1. Multi-Agent Hide and Seek @ YouTube
  2. Apple is trying to trademark ‘slofie’ @ Slashdot (oof)
  3. When Red Dead Redemption 2 comes to PC, this is where you’ll buy it @ Quarter To Three

Hacks, gadgets and crypto-jinks

  1. Your next robot needs googly eyes, and other lessons from Disney @ HackADay
  2. How would you like your steak printed? @ HackADay (rare, of course)
  3. Superbly synchronized servos swaying softly @ HackADay

Science, technology, and space news

  1. SpaceX prepares new Starship for first orbital flights @ New Atlas
  2. Egypt’s massive 1.8-Gigawatt Benban Solar Park nears completion @ Slashdot
  3. Eco Wave Power starts testing combined wave/solar power system @ New Atlas
  4. A lunar space elevator is actually feasible and inexpensive, scientists find @ Slashdot
  5. 50% of US homes still won’t have fiber broadband by 2025, study says @ Ars Technica (that seems optimistic)

Cheese, memes, what have you

  1. Does Pizza Hut’s New Cheez-It ‘Pizza’ Go Too Far? We Tried It and Found Out. @ thrillist.com (our household tried these last night, meh.)
Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

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Freebyrd
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Freebyrd

Haven’t been here in quite awhile… seems like this site has gone to the cats and dogs… sans the dogs.

ermo
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ermo

I just wanted to point out that the cat picture is awesome.

JustAnEngineer
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JustAnEngineer

What is a pirate’s favorite letter of the alphabet?

First answer
Ye might be thinkin’ it’d be “R“, but ye’d be wrong…

Second answer
…a pirate’s true love be the “C“.

willmore
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willmore

Won’t have fiber broadband? I’m in the ‘burbs and I have it. My parents live way the hell out in the middle of nowhere–not even near a town–and they have it. What’s the holdup?

2ms latency, 500/500 and it’s cheaper than cable used to be.

Krogoth
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Krogoth

Last mile is a thing and fiber rollouts are expensive and time-consuming. You have layers of local/state-level bureaucracy plus NIMBY-types.

Frankly, there are much more important things to be concerned about then ubiquitous fiber connectivity. It is more likely 5G/6G will be the answer to the last mile problem.

usacomp2k3 (AJ)
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usacomp2k3 (AJ)

5G is useless for rural areas. The range is completely inadequate. I see LEO satellite more likely to be successful

Krogoth
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Krogoth

Unless launch vehicles become significantly cheaper. LEO satellites are currently a more costly and time-consuming option than fiber rollovers. They are ill-suited for widespread rural deployment due to the sheer scale of economics until we develop a much cheaper way to launch items into LEO.

Liron
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Liron

…but the would-be ISP, in this case, owns its own reusable rocket company. So the cost is just a few (hundred thousand) gallons of liquid oxygen per many dozens of satellites (they launched 60 at once on the initial test).

Krogoth
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Krogoth

The launch vehicle needs to be built first. If you want to be reusable then you still have to pay for refurbishing it to be launch-worthly.

Captain Ned
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Captain Ned

Just try to deal with the last mile costs in a thinly-populated state.

superjawes
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superjawes

It isn’t that different for densely-populated areas. Sure, the backbones serve more customers, but you also have more potential customers, and they are will be expecting a reliable chunk of the bandwidth, and construction has to coordinate around a lot more stuff, making upgrades more difficult outside of new construction.

And once it’s there, you have to offer a good enough value for customers to actually sign up.

Krogoth
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Krogoth

Assuming that there’s isn’t some stupid local/state-level bureaucracy and NIMBY non-sense in the way.

Telecom companies in the USA can’t simply just start laying down fibers and connect residential properties on a whim even if there is an economic incentive to do so.

willmore
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willmore

That’s my I mentioned my partents who live in the thinnest populated part of a large, low population state.

Krogoth
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Krogoth

Yep, there some people who think that internet connectivity grows on trees. They don’t realize that it took years if not decades for electricity and running water to become ubiquitous.

To make matter worse in the NA. There’s tons of old infrastructure that wasn’t wiped out by two world wars.

superjawes
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superjawes

It should not surprise anyone that some of the fastest internet speeds are enjoyed by France, Scandinavia, Finland, South Korea, and Japan.

ludi
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ludi

These are the top providers in Denver right now:
https://www.highspeedinternet.com/co/denver

Gigabit is widely available, but only CenturyLink offers fiber to the user’s door, and I’m fairly sure that’s an infrastructure-class business connection. Also, you have to deal with CenturyLink.

I hear residential fiber is great everywhere that has it. But everywhere that doesn’t have it, doesn’t have even a little bit of it.

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