Nvidia announces GeForce RTX Super and FrameView GPU monitor

Look up in the sky—it’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Super GeForce! Last week’s rumors and mistaken Amazon listings were apparently true, because Nvidia has announced the GeForce RTX 2060, 2070, and 2080 family of Super graphics cards. Nvidia’s refreshed Turing lineup includes some purportedly meaty boosts to performance which could heavily shift the balance of price vs performance against not only AMD’s current Radeon RX Vega lineup but the upcoming Navi-based RX 5700 cards, too.


These over-the-top announcement videos always crack me up

As expected, the RTX 2060 and 2070 Super got substantial bumps in CUDA core counts over their predecessors. The 2060 also benefits from a wider 256-bit memory bus with 8 GB of VRAM, up from six on the original. According to Nvidia, the RTX 2060 Super is upwards of 22% faster than the vanilla version, while the RTX 2070 Super is apparently 25% faster than the base 2070. Along with the additional raster resources, Nvidia has also blessed these new GPUs with additional ray-tracing hardware. Here’s how the new lineup officially matches up with the old.

RTX Card CUDA Core Count VRAM RTX TOp/s Price
RTX 2060 1920 6 GB 192-bit 37 $349 (Amazon)
RTX 2060 Super 2176 8 GB 256-bit 41 $399
RTX 2070 2304 8 GB 256-bit 42 $479 (Amazon)
RTX 2070 Super 2560 8 GB 256-bit 52 $499
RTX 2080 2944 8 GB  256-bit 57 $699 (Amazon)
RTX 2080 Super 3072 8 GB 256-bit 63 $699

We don’t have to rely on manufacturer numbers, though, because early reviews of the RTX 2060 and 2070 Super have hit the web today. AnandTechTechPowerupHotHardware, and the Guru of 3D all found the $500 RTX 2070 Super to perform within spitting distance of the $700 RTX 2080. Against AMD’s competition, the sites all found the RTX 2070 to either catch or leapfrog the $680 7-nanometer Radeon VII more often than not, too. AMD has been comparing the Navi-based Radeon RX 5700XT favorably to the RTX 2070, but according to reviews around the web, Nvidia is retiring the older version when the Super version hits retail on July 9.

On the lower end, value has shifted significantly as well. The RTX 2060 Super isn’t launching at the RTX 2060’s $349 price point—the older card will be sticking around for now—but at $400 it still compared favorably to the original RTX 2070 and Vega 64. The new baby RTX never quite surpassed its older sibling, but in nearly every benchmark, it surpassed the older, pricier Vega 64. We’ll have to wait for the Radeon RX 5700 and 5700XT to launch later this month to see how AMD’s new tech fares against the green team, though. Look for GeForce RTX 2060 Super cards to hit the streets on July 9 alongside the 2070 variants.

Nvidia also announced the RTX 2080 Super today, but no reviews have hit the web today for that model. The fastest Super card won’t launch until July 23, at which time the company will also retire the vanilla RTX 2080. Nvidia partner cards will no doubt be announced shortly with their own customized boost speeds and custom cooling solutions, but no official listings have made their way to e-tail just yet.

Hardware isn’t all that Nvidia announced today. When the RTX 2060 and 2070 Super cards hit retail on July 9, the company will also release FrameView, a GPU monitoring utility for its graphics cards. The application will report framerates and frame times, along with power consumption and performance per watt metrics. Nvidia says FrameView will support all of the major Windows APIs and UWP games, and will be available for download from Nvidia’s site.

Ben Funk

Sega nerd and guitar lover

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zacharyt1122
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zacharyt1122

I wonder if they’ll release a 2050 or lower anytime soon. Maybe they can release a Mighty Mouse version sometime after that.

Krogoth
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Krogoth

It looks like AMD RTG baited Nvidia into a price war. AMD RTG is going to cut prices on their entire Navi line-up. We’ll have to wait and see if Nvidia will follow suite.

Keziwithchimi
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Keziwithchimi

I had to buy an RTX card, because I need tensorflow. But it has zero added value, because all the goodies like FrameView are tied to “geforce experience”, which only works if you are logged to nvidia.

Since I do not give away my privacy for a product I paid for (and I paid a lot), then geforce experience is nonexistent. None of those toys are available to me. not even the “free games” offered by nvidia to his clients, because the games are also tied to geforce experience.

Chrispy_
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Chrispy_

AMD have effectively made the 2070 and 2080 look overpriced, which we all knew – so these ‘Super’ responses to AMD’s upcoming cards is the direct result of competition. I just hope that the regular, vanilla 2070 stocks end up falling in price, since $499 is too much for something that is going to be outperformed by factory-overclocked 2060 Supers at $425 or so.

The 2060, on the other hand, has always been competitive and that’s why the performance/$ of the 2060 Super exactly matches the 2060.

fredsnotdead
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fredsnotdead

[url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aGX0YFiUGbI<]Super![/url<]

not@home
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not@home

I am all for boycotting Nvidia until they start sending review hardware to TechReport again.

psuedonymous
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psuedonymous

Frameview sounds like FCAT VR but using GPU-side hooks for timing rather than compositor-side.

LocalCitizen
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LocalCitizen

what’s the point of 2080 super? measly 4% more cuda cores.
they shoulda call it 2060 ti and 2070 ti instead of supers
which woulda been normal to they naming convention

enixenigma
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enixenigma

[quote<]The application will report framerates and frame times[/quote<] Scott's gonna be pissed.

Neutronbeam
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Neutronbeam

So will FrameView work with mobile GPUs?

Krogoth
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Krogoth

Is it a bird? Is it a plane?

No, it is SUPERGLUE! Its weakness? NGREEDNITE!

On a more serious note, it looks like Frameview is going to be a nifty performance analysis tool.

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