Microsoft rolls out Windows 10’s November update

Microsoft this week began rolling out its Windows 10 November 2019 update, bringing Windows 10 up to version 1909. This update is a smaller one (especially compared to the Creators updates), but still contains a whole host of features and improvements.

Let’s dive under the hood first. The Windows 10 1909 update brings “general battery life and power-efficiency improvements for PCs with certain processors,” Microsoft says in the update notes. The update also adds a “rotation policy” to better distribute work among your processor’s favored cores.

In terms of user-facing updates, Windows 10’s November 2019 update offers a few worth highlighting. If you’re done with Cortana but like talking to your computer, you can now enable third-party digital assistants to activate over the lock screen.

Interface improvements, too

This update also makes a few improvements to notifications. You can now disable notifications from an application or website right from the notification banner. The updates provides easier access to notification settings in general, too. You can also create calendar events straight from the calendar “flyout” on the taskbar by simply selecting a date and beginning to type.

The search box in Windows 10’s File Explorer is seeing an update, too. The box will now use Windows Search to find files. The box is wider and will integrate with OneDrive.

Starting with Windows 10 1909, Microsoft’s Narrator will learn the location of your keyboard’s FN key and monitor whether it’s locked or unlocked.

The features you don’t see

A number of enterprise and OEM improvements accompany the update, too. These will be mostly invisible to day-to-day users. OEMs can now reduce inking latency based on a device-by-device basis rather than using the OS’ default latency. Key-rolling/Key-rotation will  improve password recovery for BitLocker devices. The update adds additional debugging capabilities for newer Intel CPUs.

Most of the features are easy to overlook. If you’re on the right cocktail of hardware, though, you could see a performance boost and improvements to battery life.

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jay
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jay

I was happy to see it but then encountered “critical process died” (aka: your screwed) and spent the weekend putting the pieces back together. No boot to win no nothing. None of the win10 tools were of any use to fix it. Ended up doing a low level format on nvme and reinstalling Win 10. Thx MSFT but a little early for a xmas present.

Klumpo
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I hope MS will hardware accelerate File Explorer with Direct2D soon. Valve just updated Steam and it is super smooth and responsive on my 120Hz monitor 🤩

The lost cat
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The lost cat

Windows 10X might have a new file explorer. Don’t know if it’ll come to normal 10 or not, but I assume so.

Krogoth
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Krogoth

Windows 7 is about to taken back to the alleyway.

kvndoom
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kvndoom

Yeh, don’t remind me. I’m hoping to get a pair of 500GB SSD’s on Black Friday/Cyber Monday so I’ll have all the hardware I need to go through the drudgery of installing Windows again. This W7 install has been going since May 2016. RIP.

Spunjji
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Spunjji

If it’s any consolation, Windows 10 is significantly easier to install than Windows 7. Doesn’t make a difference when it comes to the joy of reinstalling and configuring applications, but it helps all the same.

Neutronbeam
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Neutronbeam

After doing a reinstall of Windows on my main rig a few weeks ago, this installed fine. My back-up system stalled on 1903, so doing Slow Ring Insider Preview on it to see what happens.

JustAnEngineer
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JustAnEngineer

I installed it on my gaming desktop last night. There were no immediate problems.

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