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Inwin, EKWB go all-in on 909EK $1,829 liquid-cooling case

For those of us that don’t do liquid cooling with our rigs, the whole thing seems like a huge hassle. Listening to enthusiasts talk about it, though, something becomes clear: the hassle is the whole point. If PC builders were car nuts, then the people building liquid-cooled systems would be the people who build hot rods from parts. And that’s why the limited-edition InWin 909EK, designed in collaboration with EKWB, doesn’t sound that unreasonable at nearly $2,000. It’s twice the price of many gamers’ entire rigs, but for someone out there, it’s the only case that will do.

InWin 909EK Limited Edition Liquid Cooling Case

EKWB describes the InWin 909EK as a “unique and heavily-modified version of the very popular high-end InWin 909 case.” The unique features on the case start with an increased width to accommodate two 480-mm XE radiators with fans. The case doesn’t have a traditional motherboard tray, either. Instead, it has a huge integrated distribution plate that acts as a motherboard tray. The plate can house dual D5 pump setups, and it acts as a reservoir for your system’s liquid complete with integrated G1/4″ inlet and outlet points to simplify hard cooling loops. InWin and EKWB say the number of ports on the plate means that it can support up to four liquid-cooled graphics cards.

Plugging into the InWin 909EK

InWin 909EK Limited Edition Liquid Cooling Case

The InWin 909EK features 4-mm thick aluminum. One feature that’s very intentionally missing from the case is a tempered glass panel. Going back to the car metaphor, this is the equivalent of those massive scoops on hot rods. This case exposes your loop to the open air to make it easy to show off. The lack of a panel also means that the front I/O can be out of the way. The case offers two USB Type-A ports, one USB Type-C port, and HD audio jacks.

The 909EK is 255 x 575 x 540mm. It can handle ATX power supplies up to 250mm, and GPUs up to 365-mm long and 180-mm wide. The case can accept motherboards of the ATX, [amazon_textlink asin=’B07FKV5HWJ’ text=’Micro-ATX’ template=’ProductLink’ store=’techreport09-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’bc0f047a-bd51-479e-92d4-c5b440a3253e’], [amazon_textlink asin=’B07BKJQB6W’ text=’Mini-ITX’ template=’ProductLink’ store=’techreport09-20′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’23ddb9eb-c2b9-4f7f-a8f8-b67fc4ea2355′], and E-ATX form factors, as long as the former is 277-mm wide or less.

InWin and EKWB know this is going to be something for a very small audience; they’re limiting the run to just 200 cases. The InWin 909EK releases on March 19 of 2020 for €1,499.90 or $1,280 US.

3 responses to “Inwin, EKWB go all-in on 909EK $1,829 liquid-cooling case

  1. Distribution plates were fun, cool and neat-O when people scratch built them or made them with homemade CNC machines, etc. They have lost that uniqueness that makes them special with mass production.

  2. I don’t think I’ve paid that much for an entire system (let alone just the case) since 1995 or thereabouts. Holy moly!

  3. I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone put it as succintly as this:

    For those of us that don’t do liquid cooling with our rigs, the whole thing seems like a huge hassle. Listening to enthusiasts talk about it, though, something becomes clear: the hassle is the whole point.

    Hat tip to you Eric. =)

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