AMD’s 2007 analyst day: Platforms and the glass half full

Two phrases can sum up the message AMD related to analysts in its 2007 analyst day presentation today: “the glass is half full” and “business as usual.” The company believes its current momentum can carry it to profitability next year, and it made almost no mention of the “asset light” business model some were expecting to be unveiled.

Starting off with the company’s bread and butter—its microprocessor business—AMD President and COO Dirk Meyer opened the presentation with mention of the TLB erratum that’s drawn so much attention lately, but he went on to say stumbles in AMD’s quad-core roll-out have overshadowed the company’s achievements. Meyer pointed out AMD’s expanded business with Toshiba along with its strong notebook presence, completed transition to 65nm process technology, supply chain improvements, and increased average selling prices and margins.

The “glass is half full” mentality also manifested in Meyer’s assertion that AMD doesn’t need the fastest chips around to succeed. “Many people feel AMD needs to have the best-performing CPU component . . . That perception is false,” he bluntly stated. Throughout the presentation, Meyer and other speakers (notably Computing Products Group Executive VP Mario Rivas) made a point to de-emphasize the microprocessor and instead draw attention to the graphics component, which they say is key to the overall “end-user experience.” However, they were quick to follow up by promising that AMD doesn’t plan to drop out of the “race for supremacy” in the microprocessor market.

Rivas also contrasted AMD’s current position to that of four or five years ago, pointing to the firm’s large number of design wins with major PC vendors and its newfound presence in the graphics, consumer electronics, and game console markets.

However, AMD isn’t kidding itself: it needs to return to profitability, and quickly. To do so, Meyer said AMD intends to tap “all the major profit pools” in the industry and focus on the sweet spots in terms of volume and revenue in order to “deliver high-end performance to the mainstream.” The company also intends to make strides in the small and medium business, notebook, commercial client, graphics, and consumer electronics markets.

Part of AMD’s efforts appear in the form of a crowded list of new platforms planned for the next couple of years. Those platforms span the notebook, enterprise, mainstream, enthusiast, and server/workstation markets, and they mark a radical departure from AMD’s tradition of providing an open ecosystem for companies like Nvidia and VIA to plug their graphics and core logic products into.

Notebook

Among AMD’s list of new platforms are the notebook-oriented Puma and Shrike. AMD has already talked about Puma: it’s on track for a launch in the first quarter of next year, and will include a new “Griffin” dual-core processor, an RS780 chipset with DirectX 10-class integrated graphics, an M8x mobile graphics processor, and support for the DASH PC management specification.

In 2009, Puma will be followed by “Shrike,” which will introduce a 45nm “Swift” CPU with three K10 microprocessor cores and one graphics processor core. (“Swift” is basically AMD’s Fusion CPU/GPU chimera under a new code name. AMD says it will come out in the second half of 2009.) Shrike will also bring M9x graphics, a next-gen south bridge, and DDR3 memory support.

One of AMD’s slides suggests Griffin will be dubbed “Turion Ultra,” although AMD didn’t speak about the brand directly. As for the M8x graphics processor, it’ll be based on 55nm process technology and will feature native support for DisplayPort display outputs. The General Manager and Senior VP of AMD’s Graphics Products Group, Rick Bergman, boasted that AMD has secured more design wins with notebook vendors for 2008 than Nvidia. Bergman believes AMD will return to being the number-one vendor of discrete graphics processors for notebooks next year.

Enterprise

In the enterprise (or “commercial mainstream”) segment, AMD will roll out a new “Perseus” platform in the first quarter of 2008. Perseus will presumably fight it out with Intel’s vPro platform, and it will bring quad-, triple-, and dual-core processors based on AMD’s K10 architecture, an RS780 chipset with DX10 integrated graphics, optional R600-series graphics with “Hybrid Graphics,” and support for the DASH and Trusted Platform Module specs. Hybrid Graphics technology will basically allow users to pair up a system’s integrated graphics with a compatible discrete graphics card for improved performance. Perseus will also put an accent on energy efficiency, with a maximum processor power envelope of just 65W.

In the latter part of 2009, a new platform dubbed Kodiak will succeed Perseus. Kodiak will bring triple- and quad-core 45nm processors with the same RS780 integrated graphics chipset (albeit with a new SB700+ south bridge), optional R700-series graphics, and Socket AM3 motherboards with support for DDR3 RAM and future versions of the DASH spec.

Mainstream

AMD’s “platformization” will carry over into the mainstream market, too, where the company will unveil a new Cartwheel platform in the first quarter of 2008. Cartwheel will combine quad-, triple-, and dual-core K10 processors, the RS780 DX10 integrated graphics chipset, optional R600-series graphics processors with Hybrid Graphics functionality, and Vista Premium certification. Cartwheel will include AMD Live! Explorer software to provide users with a “common [user interface] for all entertainment,” as well.

Cartwheel will be followed in 2009 by a “Cartwheel refresh” platform with 45nm quad-, triple-, and dual-core K10 processors, DDR3 memory support, an RS780 chipset (but with a new SB800 south bridge), optional R700-series graphics processors (also with Hybrid Graphics capability), and new Socket AM3 motherboards.

Enthusiast

AMD has already rolled out its Spider platform (see our reviews of the Phenom processors, 790FX chipset, and Radeon HD 3800 graphics processors) but there’s plenty more where that came from. Spider is set to be succeeded by the “Leo” platform in the latter part of next year. Leo will feature 45nm triple- and quad-core K10 chips with DDR2 memory support, 790FX/790/770 chipsets with SB700 south bridges, and R600-series graphics processors.

Leo will itself be replaced by a Leo Refresh platform in 2009. Leo Refresh will feature 45nm triple- and quad-core CPUs with DDR3 memory support, a new RS800 chipset with an SB800 south bridge, R700-series graphics processors, and new Socket AM3 motherboards.

Server/workstation

AMD even has plans for platforms in the server and workstation worlds, although those plans won’t see the light of day until next year. For the second half of 2008 and early 2009, AMD will pair up its 45nm “Shanghai” quad-core Opterons with Nvidia and Broadcom chipsets as it currently does with its 65nm “Barcelona” Opterons.

In 2009, however, the situation will change as AMD rolls out its 45nm “Montreal” octal- and quad-core processors. Those chips will have 1MB of L2 cache per core, 6-12MB of L3 cache per chip, DDR3 memory support, and a new G3 socket code-named “Piranha”.

Montreal processors will be coupled with the RD890S and RD870S north bridges and an SB700S south bridge. On the graphics front, AMD will offer R700-based FireGL and Fire MV graphics processors for workstation customers as well as ATI ES-1000 chips on the server. AMD hasn’t assigned a code name to this bundle of products, but it will be an all-AMD platform much like those mentioned above.

Miscellaneous tidbits

AMD’s presentation didn’t dwell entirely on platforms—the company also revealed more details about future individual products. For instance, Rivas stated that we can expect 2.5GHz quad-core chips in the April-May time frame. On the graphics front, Bergman talked about the upcoming R680, which he confirmed will combine two graphics processors on a single graphics board and launch with a price tag in excess of $300.

AMD also has a pair of new mainstream graphics processors lined up for January: the RV620 and RV635, which will both feature DirectX 10.1 and PCI Express 2.0 support, Universal Video Decoder technology, and the ability to work in CrossFire X multi-GPU configurations. Driver support for CrossFire X three- and four-way GPU setups will become available some time in the first quarter of 2008, as well.

Manufacturing

There’s been talk among analysts and the press of AMD selling its fabs and outsourcing all production, but there were no traces of such plans in today’s presentation. Doug Grose, Senior VP of Manufacturing & Supply Chain Management, talked about AMD’s manufacturing strategy, and he said the company is still pursuing its “asset smart” model—outsourcing graphics processor production to TSMC and UMC, outsourcing some microprocessor production to Chartered Semiconductor, and handling remaining microprocessor production with its own fabs.

AMD’s plans for a “Fab 4x” in New York are still on, too, with Hector Ruiz himself stating, “We’re looking forward to the day that we ship the greatest products in the processing arena out of New York.” Ruiz also added, “We want to continue to have a world-class manufacturing operation.” Still, Chartered is ready to produce quad-core chips in 2008 should AMD choose to have it do so.

Moving on, Grose spoke about AMD’s plans for the transitions to 45nm and 32nm process technology. 45nm production is still scheduled to ramp in the first half of 2008, with product shipments due in the second half.

As for the 32nm process, Grose said it’s being jointly developed with IBM and that it’s an efficient, “gate first” high-k/metal gate process. AMD has already done test ramps of 32nm SRAMs, and according to AMD’s process technology roadmap, production is set for the 2010 time frame.

Financials

AMD Executive VP and CFO Bob Rivet then came on stage to talk about AMD’s financial plans. He also uttered the “glass half full” mantra and stated, “We have a lot of opportunities staring us in the face.”

Those opportunities were neatly listed on one of the presentation slides, as was Grose’s guidance for 2008 unit growth. Grose expects growth of 15% or more in microprocessor units, growth of more than 6% in graphics units, and growth of more than 10.5% overall in the consumer electronics space—numbers that should all equal or surpass the expected industry growth rate.

On to more nitty-gritty financial details, Grose said AMD is aiming for higher margins, lower research and development costs, lower marketing, general, and administrative costs, and a return to profitability in the third quarter. He also suggested the company would break even in Q2. In the meantime, AMD has something in the neighborhood of $2 billion in its piggy bank and an additional $600 million worth of assets it can monetize “at the appropriate time.”

Conclusion

So where does that leave AMD in 2008? Based on what we heard today, we can expect disappointing financial results for the fourth quarter of this year and the first quarter of 2008. However, AMD is right about one thing: it has a fair amount of momentum, and if it manages to execute as planned, 2008 may very well turn out to be a good year.

On the microprocessor front, AMD should have 45nm tri- and quad-core chips ready in time to meet Intel’s 45nm Nehalem processors. Even if it doesn’t manage to keep up with Nehalem, AMD’s plethora of platforms should help keep large PC vendors interested. AMD looks set to regain much-needed market share in the mobile graphics market, although how well the AMD graphics division will do on the desktop remains to be seen. The Radeon HD 3870 and Radeon HD 3850 are certainly encouraging efforts, though.

While it’s probably still a little early to make any forecasts pertaining to 2009 and beyond, AMD’s outlook and confidence suggest the company still has at least a few more rounds to go—even with naysayers predicting its imminent demise.

Comments closed
    • Ubik
    • 12 years ago

    I’m not buying anything for the Shrike platform unless it has time-traveling capabilities.

    • PetMiceRnice
    • 12 years ago

    Of course I do hope that AMD can thrive and compete, although I still rue the day they bought ATI. However, the thing to remember about ATI is that they easily survived for many years going back to the 1980s by selling low-cost graphics solutions. There’s nothing saying that AMD/ATI cannot survive by catering to the bulk of the PC market which buys low-end and mid-range parts. Only a small percentage of users actually buy the higher-end parts.

    It may suck for enthusiasts not having competition at the top, but it may give a sigh of relief knowing that you can hang onto your hardware longer since there is less incentive to push the envelope on the part of hardware makers. As long as AMD can remain reasonably competitive on the mid-range, it will still move the hardware industry along, even if more slowly. I might not speak for everyone, but I for one don’t like buying a new $300 to $400 video card and then only 12 months later seeing something new come out that is twice as fast at the same price point.

    • somedude743
    • 12 years ago

    I think AMD needs to have a smaller, lower volume production line in Dresden (or with Chartered in Singapore) that is optimized for cranking out “the latest and greatest” desktop Phenom processors … the ones in the “Leo/Leo Refresh Platform” for enthusiasts for 2008/2009.

    I think it’s important for AMD to have all the “good vibes” they can get from the gamers and PC enthusiasts. It’s the gamers and enthusiasts who have a lot of influence on everyone else who don’t have as much knowledge about PC hardware. Most people don’t really want to put in the time to research what the latest “awesome PC gear of the year” is, so they usually just ask that guy at school or work is a gamer or a PC techie. They might even take the word of the guys working at Best Buy somewhat too. Other people just get on the internet and google up 5-10 reviews on PC hardware if they have a little knowledge of PCs. The people who write these reviews are definitely enthusiasts and usually bigtime gamers.

    Because of these “influencers” (like the marketing people call them), AMD needs to try to match or surpass Intel’s “latest and greatest” processors for the desktop as quickly as possible. *[

    • cripplecore
    • 12 years ago

    You missed some big news. AMD was a bit sneaky about it of course:

    #1. “Bulldozer”, AMD’s next-gen core, the Nehalem-competitor, no longer shows up in 2009.

    Back in July, it was featured in a couple slides, and 2 parts: ‘Falcon’ (Bulldozer core + graphics, the first Fusion part), and ‘Sandtiger’ (Bulldozer core server part, up to 8 cores)

    Now, Falcon is gone, replaced with ‘Swift’ (K10 core + graphics), and ‘Sandtiger’ is gone from 2009 roadmaps. Now there’s just Montreal there.

    So Bulldozer is delayed to at least 2010, or canceled.

    Bulldozer was not mentioned anywhere in AMD’s presentations yesterday. Not sure about ‘Bobcat’, another core from July.

    #2 R700. Now showing up in Q2 09 at the earliest. WTH? That’s a big slip, if true.

    Basically, AMD’s hope of challenging Intel and nVidia performance just went out the window for the foreseeable future.

      • Krogoth
      • 12 years ago

      I also believe it means that Intel and NVidia have very little reason to do any significant refreshes in the foreseeable future.

      Where is the missing “8900GTX”? The 8800GT and 8800GTS 512MB are enough proof that a full-brown GPU version of the GPU exists. However, Nvidia has no reason to deliver due to the lack of competition at the high-end.

      I wouldn’t place too much faith in Nehalem. It is being developed by the same engineering team that brought us Netburst architect. The most that was gather from leaks is that Nehalem will have a massive emphasis on parallelism.

        • green
        • 12 years ago

        well the x9xx has only been in the 5xxx and 7xxx range so far
        i can’t seem to recall nvidia releasing a 6900GT/X/S card
        thought they may have skipped it for other reasons….

      • orthogonal
      • 12 years ago

      To be fair, this was a Financial Analyst meeting. The details you are looking for are reserved for the Technology Analyst meeting next spring. Stockholder’s don’t have much interest in 2009/2010 future products and expectations right now. They’re concerned about AMD’s immediate solvency and path to return to profits.

        • cripplecore
        • 12 years ago

        That’s a silly excuse.

        AMD showed roadmaps, they just didn’t bother mentioning what had been removed. And that’s their trouble. They always try to sneak out the bad news, whatever it is, minimizing it, denying it, etc., until it blows up in their faces.

        Witness the “we don’t do soft launches” ATI launch this spring, the Barcelona “launch” in September, the Phenom TLB bug and performance-killing work-around.

        And then they have the nerve to lecture analysts who wonder why plans have changed…

        “First of all, I want to correct something: We *never* said we’d break even in Q4!” huffed Mr Meyer. Trouble is, both he and Bob Rivet DID hype Q4 breakeven, on the record, in the July Q2 conference call. What a jerk.

          • ScythedBlade
          • 12 years ago

          Five bucks that those road maps are gonna be paper launches … …
          (AMD is dying … and I’m somewhat happy because they were too bastardy in their behavior when they were winning … … I wanted cheap X2s …)

      • Flying Fox
      • 12 years ago

      If these things are pointed out and emphasized then we will have a major incident on our hands where all the fanboys will come again out of the woodwork to denounce TR as “piling on the bad news”. We wouldn’t want that to happen, eh? It can get ugly very quickly.

      πŸ™‚

        • provoko
        • 12 years ago

        That was like who, three people? Don’t know why TR didn’t mention Bulldozer.

    • d2brothe
    • 12 years ago

    I believe you meant Leo will replace spider later NEXT year.

    • muyuubyou
    • 12 years ago

    Errata:

    “The Radeon HD 3870 and Radeon HD 3870 are certainly encouraging efforts, though.”

    In “Conclusion” – closing second paragraph.

    Feel free to delete this comment when fixed.

      • Cyril
      • 12 years ago

      Fixed. Thanks.

    • jerlands
    • 12 years ago

    Well, they’ve got real nice lookin’ graphics.

    • danny e.
    • 12 years ago

    what this seems to point to, is AMD/ATI should have a graphics card that can handle Crysis at Very High Settings @ 1920×1200 .. sometime around mid -2009.

    somehow I dont think Nvidia will take that long.

      • indeego
      • 12 years ago

      Uh, who cares? Crysis was fun for a week, what’s up nextg{

        • willyolio
        • 12 years ago

        given that even a triple-SLI 8800GTX system still couldn’t handle crysis at 1920×1200 at very high settings… i’d say it’ll remain a good benchmarking/stress testing tool long after it becomes boring.

        • danny e.
        • 12 years ago

        a.) if they cant handle current games, they wont be able to handle any future games that are even more graphically intensive.

        b.) some of us… maybe just me… have enough patience to not buy a game until AFTER I have a video card that can handle it.. so I can play the game as it was intended to be played.. in high res. I’m expecting I’ll be waiting till spring or summer of next year. πŸ™

          • indeego
          • 12 years ago

          My 8800 GTS 640 (a year old card at this point) handled the game fine. Slowdowns? On the alien levels, which everyone complained about and was so incredibly dull I was glad to scale down graphics. These levels obviously have some optimization to go through.

          Jungle? Nary a hitch.

          The game was well worth it, I played it through 3 times on the three upper levels, but it’s old hat. Bring on Far Cry 2 or whatever else is next upg{<...<}g I played it on the High "tweaked" from the tweakguide site and didn't notice much difference in graphics from "high."

            • danny e.
            • 12 years ago

            pft. at 640×480 ?
            dont try to lie to me about playing on high at 1600×1200 because i’ve seen the TR benchies.

            • indeego
            • 12 years ago

            Neither. 1680x1050g{<.<}g

            • danny e.
            • 12 years ago

            what fps did you average.. and how often was it choppy?
            my basic reason for waiting is because i want high settings and dont want to run into any choppiness.

            • indeego
            • 11 years ago

            I think when I benched it was averaging around 25 fps. It was playable until the ice and ship levels, where it got very choppy and I had to revert to no effects essentiallyg{<.<}g

            • provoko
            • 12 years ago

            The dozens of sites that have benchmarked the game don’t lie. Maybe you’re satisfied less than 30 fps, but most people aren’t.

            If I don’t average 45, I can’t play the game, if it dips below 30, it is unplayable. The range 30-60 is the norm.

          • provoko
          • 12 years ago

          Nvidia is in the same boat there.

      • danny e.
      • 12 years ago

      yeah. if thats true AMD can kiss goodbye to most if not all of the gamer market. there is no way they can stay on top with that kind of complacency.

      R680 is just 2x HD 3870 which will barely capture the lead over the GTS 512.. and thats IF they get the drivers to work right.

      then Nvidia comes out with their next high-end part in spring and AMD is in the dust until 2009. Of course, by 2009, Nvidia will also have a new part.

    • alex666
    • 12 years ago

    I was struck by the breadth of AMD at this point in time. What, barely a year ago, they were a chip company. Now it’s chipsets and GPUs and integrated GPUs and so forth. If anything, the breadth of their presentation underscores the radical changes of the past year and certainly could account for some of their shortcomings. I suspect any business that changes so radically would stumble in the first year of so. It could work out, or it could a Daimler Chrysler. Time will tell I guess. But bottom line: AMD isn’t just a small chip company anymore.

      • WaltC
      • 12 years ago

      Good points, and probably too objective to feed the mania some people seem to have right now. AMD has surely seen far tougher times than these. In 1998, for instance, it was nigh impossible to find a business “analyst” who wasn’t publicly and loudly proclaiming that the end for AMD was very near. I mean, they were *all* writing AMD off as doomed in 1998. Uh, now they are at it again. I guess some folks just never learn the first time…;)

      The problem is that is just easier and safer for “analysts” and scared tech journalists to hype Intel while writing off AMD. In 1999, in dire contradiction of all of these supposed experts, AMD actually took off like a rocket. I expect that they will do it again.

      I mean, let’s just look at the *years* AMD was wiping the floor with Intel in the x86 cpu department–prior to Core 2’s introduction. What did Intel do? Why, they were fairly successful selling the “second rate” x86 cpus everybody is now saying AMD won’t be successful in selling. It’s really pretty funny, actually. In fact, if you go out to sites like NewEgg you’ll see that Intel is *still* managing to sell those very same second rate cpus–even after Core 2.

      For some people the cpu world begins and ends with Core 2. I hate to be the one to tell them, but that’s not even true for Intel, and it certainly won’t be true for AMD.

        • pluscard
        • 12 years ago

        Walt – it wasn’t just in ’98. In late 2002, the bankruptcy talk pushed AMD’s share price down to under $4/share. Most of the analysts talked like it was a given, that AMD would close up. If you go back and read the articles, they read exactly as today – they talk about how Intel will use it’s r&d budget, and manufacturing prowess to cut costs, and out maneuver AMD.

        Instead, AMD’s share price ran from $4 to $40 over the next 3 years.

        I like your point about how Intel continued to be profitable despite the Athlon kicking around the P4. I find it instructive how AMD has continued to gain marketshare, and some key accounts (Dell & Toshiba) despite the core2duo success.

        Well the stock is once again trading sub $8. Is another run to $40 possible?

          • Flying Fox
          • 12 years ago

          q[

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 12 years ago

    Yeah those plans all call for a 45nm process cores by mid-2009, but they had a hard enough time just getting 65m cores inside of 2007–and even then they’re a little buggy (TLB).

    I got a laugh out of that AMD vs. nVidia graph projections on page two.

      • VILLAIN_xx
      • 12 years ago

      Who ever was in charge of the actual graph creation must’ve had some sort of reaction when he/she was told what to make.

      “HA, are you sure this is correct? Youre serious arent you? Oook what ever you say dude.”

        • d2brothe
        • 12 years ago

        Didn’t they state that they’ve already won said contracts, and thus these numbers are hardly speculation.

          • ssidbroadcast
          • 12 years ago

          Yeah well last I checked laptop vendors account for a large part of the OEM market, and nVidia beat ATi to the punch with both 8600m and 8700 parts. I can’t think of an equivalent ATi part, hence why Apple, for example, dropped the x1600 Go in favor of the 8600m in their MBPros.

          I wouldn’t be surprised if reality paints a /[

    • orthogonal
    • 12 years ago

    Things are looking pretty gloomy in Sunnyvale. I don’t think we’re going to see a turnaround in 2008. When Barcelona was released, the excuse was always a new stepping just around the corner, First it was BA, then B2, now we have to wait for B3. When is everyone going to realize this is just smoke-and-mirrors and a red herring hiding a much bigger problem. AMD’s 65nm process is a bust.

    The writing is on the wall, We know the K8 architecture can scale to 3Ghz and beyond since there are plenty of 90nm chips doing just that, but 12 months after the launch of Brisbane, there have yet to be any shipping bins to reach 3Ghz, let alone higher. Couple this with the fact that 2.6 Ghz Phenom 9900 samples are slated for a 140W TDP and it nearly seals the deal. Their process is running near a cliff and they have a nearly insurmountable thermal/power wall to get to 3 Ghz on K10.

    The TLB erratum, while obviously a problem, becomes a very fortuitous mishap. From a PR perspective, they can blame the problem on a fixable design flaw as opposed to admitting a fundamental manufacturing/process problem. They now have the “luxury” of tweaking the process for a few more months in the hopes they can get decent binnings. They’re also able to keep shipping K8’s which are a proven product which are cheaper to produce (smaller dies) and targets a larger market (Quad’s are certainly not mainstream).

    If AMD manages to ship 3 Ghz Barcelona’s by the end of Q2 ’08 like they’re guiding now, I’ll eat crow, but I’m calling it right now. We’re never going to see 3 Ghz Barcelona’s on 65nm, atleast not until a Shanghai 45nm shrink.

    • Ryu Connor
    • 12 years ago

    Flip-Mode:q[

      • flip-mode
      • 12 years ago

      q[

    • flip-mode
    • 12 years ago

    How the HECK does everyone do this blue text? I only see options for red and green. I HATE the red and green, I wanna do blue to. Please, tell me.

      • BoBzeBuilder
      • 12 years ago

      Don’t encourage him.

      • crazybus
      • 12 years ago

      hmm….makes me wonder which colours work:
      r{< red <}r n{ orange }n y{< yellow <}y l[< green <]l g{< green <}g p{< pink <}p b{< blue <}b Just r{< red <}r and l[< green <]l and q[< blue <]q I guess.

        • Kevin
        • 12 years ago

        If you look down below the post message box, you’ll see a list of “Jazztags” that demonstrate all the different available options.

    • gratuitous
    • 12 years ago

    q[<"Grose said AMD is aiming for higher margins<]q [gonna be kinda hard to charge more for buggy chips], q[

      • shalmon
      • 12 years ago

      as much as i root for the underdogs for multiple reasons…

      i agree with you there….sad…but true…

    • provoko
    • 12 years ago

    Damn. They’re cutting all their good ideas. Last year they had a better outline of what they were going to do. What happened to bulldozer (did I miss it)?

    • Ryu Connor
    • 12 years ago

    q[

      • IntelMole
      • 12 years ago

      Pretty much my thoughts exactly.

      Right now they don’t have the performance lead per clock, and their chips are priced appropriately. How will this lead to profitability in the future?

        • muyuubyou
        • 12 years ago

        They’re in “let’s hope for the best” mode. Maybe some time in the future they can have the performance crown again.

        Right now, AMD is selling more than ever. Their chips are not a rarity anymore in major OEM computers, their graphics power all current-gen consoles. It looks like they will be able to survive the latest let-downs.

        There’s hope for a cheap tri-core Phenom and on-die graphics some day.

          • green
          • 12 years ago

          strange that … i didn’t realize RSX was from ATi …
          i guess one of us is wrong

            • muyuubyou
            • 12 years ago

            You mean the Sony Cell BluRay player and computer? it also has some good games.

            • willyolio
            • 12 years ago

            i didn’t realize the PS3 was even a contender in the current console wars.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This