Cyborg’s Rat 7 adjustable gaming mouse

Manufacturer Cyborg Gaming
Model Rat 7
Price (street)
Availability Now

When I find something that fits just right, I tend to stick with it. With running shoes, it’s New Balance’s 1060, whose model number has reliably ticked up once a year since I started wearing them. After five years, I’m now onto the 1064. For jeans, I have a few pairs of Levi’s Straight Loose cut. They sit nicely on my hips without needing belt, the crotch doesn’t hang around my knees, and there’s enough room to pedal my fixed-gear bike around town comfortably. On that and just about all of my steeds, I have seats made by Wilderness Trail Bikes. What can I say? WTB’s designs fit my undercarriage, and that’s a crucial point of contact for someone who thinks a six-hour ride is a perfectly relaxing way to spend a Sunday.

A proper fit is crucial for comfortable or competitive cycling, and I love that bikes offer all sorts of adjustment potential. Over the years, I’ve been able to tune my riding position carefully, settling on just the right seat height, stem length, handlebar angle, and grip tape. Such meticulous fiddling might seem obsessive, but it makes a big difference given how much time I spend perched on the pedals.

So, how much time do you spend with a mouse in hand? If you’re a PC enthusiast, probably quite a lot—if not at work, then certainly at home. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a mouse with a custom fit? That’s what Cyborg Gaming, a subsidiary of Mad Catz, has created with its Rat 7 gaming rodent. The Rat has all the fixings one might order with a premium gaming mouse, such as an insanely precise sensor and loads of programmable buttons, plus one very special trick: users can modify the mouse’s size and shape to suit their hands.

As someone whose own apish mitts are notoriously difficult to fit, I was immediately intrigued. Then I saw the Rat and, well, I had to give it a try. I think you’ll understand why:

Meet the Rat

Just look at it. Never before have I seen such a distinctive mouse. The exposed screws and sharp lines give the Rat an air of mechanical stealthiness. From some angles, the it’s barely identifiable as a PC peripheral. I half expect one day to hear the iconic Transformers sound and look down to find a tiny Decepticon perched on my desk. Presumably, it will then attempt to strangle me with the mouse’s nicely braided USB cable. The Rat looks entirely too menacing to be a friendly Autobot.

A black, almost satin finish nicely complements mouse’s radar-deflecting surfaces. The matte treatment is smooth but not slippery, and unlike a glossy or polished coating, it won’t pick up fingerprints and smudges. Excessively greasy fingertips will leave behind some residue, and you’ll definitely want to keep this puppy away from the Cheeto guy who seems to show up at every LAN party. The Rat’s blacked-out aesthetic and exposed internals make it easy to see the little flecks of dust, food, and dandruff that are sure to accumulate over time.

Certainly, it would be a shame for bright orange particulate sully the Rat’s brooding exterior. This mouse has lived on my desk for more than a month now, and there are still times that I pause for a moment just to admire it. I’m not just lusting after its brutally gorgeous lines, but at the function that defines this mouse’s striking form. The Rat looks like the combination of a bunch of different pieces because that’s very much what it is, and you can swap and adjust most of those individual elements.

To illustrate the range of adjustment options, I’ve put together a handy side-by-side image of the mouse in its most compact and expanded forms. The palm rest can be extended aft by up to 15 mm, and there’s 10 mm of forward-and-back range in the thumb rest. Users can also change the angle at which the thumb rest pivots out from the main body.

Over on the right, an optional wing provides a resting place for one’s pinky finger. I didn’t find this particular attachment to be all that comfortable, perhaps because it’s home to some of the mouse’s most aggressive edges. Fortunately, the Rat comes with a couple of flat panels for the right side. You can’t move the thumb rest to accommodate wrong-handed lefties, though.

A second palm rest is 4 mm taller than the standard unit, allowing users to add a little arc the mouse’s profile. When combined with the front-to-back adjustment range, the Rat can easily grow to cradle larger palms and provide extra reach for lengthy fingers. Users are limited to moving the palm rest between four notches along the mouse’s spine, though. There are no such restrictions associated with adjusting the thumb rest, whose angle and position can be tweaked less than a millimeter at a time.

From this angle, we get a nice look at the Allen bolt that holds the mouse’s side panel in place. If you don’t want the pinky wing, you can choose between smooth and rubberized side plates. Similar choices are offered with the palm rest: the taller module is only available with a smooth finish, but shorter palm rests are included with the same surface treatments as the side plates.

The rubberized coating offers a little cushioning and extra grip, and I prefer it for gaming and general desktop use. Although it doesn’t seem like much, the hint of extra padding does make a difference, especially after a long day.

Despite loads of exposed edges and angular surfaces, the Rat 7 is remarkably comfortable to hold once you’ve got the fit dialed in. I’ve yet to use a more comfortable mouse in day-to-day desktop tasks… even when those tasks extend well beyond the normal working day and into 10- and 12-hour territory. That said, during multi-hour gaming sessions, I did develop a bit of a sore spot where my hand touches the bottom-left edge of the palm rest. For what it’s worth, the fingers on my other hand felt considerably more crippled after hammering away at the WASD keys for the same amount of time.

And there’s more

Hard-core gaming mice have come with removable weights for a while now, and the Rat 7 has a collection of its own buried within the frame. There are five metal donuts in all, each of which weighs 6 grams. A spring keeps the weights securely anchored if only a couple are in use, and a handy rubber container is provided to store the ones that aren’t. The Allen key used to turn the mouse’s various bolts is even slicker; it screws directly into the weight shaft and should be very difficult to lose.

Without its auxiliary weights onboard, the Rat tips our fancy new scale at 154 grams. That’s a little on the heavy side for a wired mouse that isn’t bloated by the weight of a battery, and I suspect it’s the penalty one pays for the prevalence of metal components over plastic. Given the Rat’s sturdy feel and excellent build quality, I don’t mind a little extra heft. In fact, I actually prefer running the mouse with all five weights.

Tweaking options permeate nearly every aspect of the Rat. Just above the mouse wheel sits a DPI rocker that lets you click through four pre-defined sensitivity settings. The extra button over to the right is a mode switcher that toggles between three button-mapping configs. A logo set into the button glows different colors to indicate which mode is in use, while a set of four LEDs on the left edge of the mouse light up to identify the current DPI setting. Best of all, none of the lights blind, blink, or otherwise exhibit the garishness usually associated with gaming hardware.

The wheel has a rubber tread with plenty of traction for one’s fingertip. This is a clicky unit as opposed to one that offers smooth scrolling, which makes sense given the Rat’s gaming aspirations. Logitech’s latest gaming mouse can switch its wheel between clicky and friction-free scrolling modes, though. As it turns out, the Rat doesn’t have every adjustment option under the sun.

Traditional left and right mouse buttons flank the wheel, and they’re nice and large. Both buttons offer excellent tactile feedback and strike with a sharply audible click.

While the Rat’s wheel lacks tilt functionality for side scrolling, you get a second scroll wheel that’s really more of a thumb knob. No rubber this time around, but the knob’s metal ridges offer enough grip that rolling in either direction requires little more than a flick. Unfortunately, this thumb knob can’t be configured to side-scroll like a tilt wheel, although it is open to all kinds of other programming via Cyborg’s software. More on that in a moment.

First, I must point your attention to the adjustable thumb pod and its three buttons. The two along the top edge are conventional forward and back buttons. To their left is a “precision aim” button that cuts the mouse sensitivity if you want to switch quickly from twitch-shooting from the hip to something that’s a little more manageable when zoomed in through a scope.

Flipping the Rat onto its back reveals a thick metal base and several very slick pads. With the aid of a “twin eye” laser, the Rat can track at resolutions up to 5600 DPI and speeds as high as 6 meters per second. My aging reflexes are far too sluggish to take real advantage of this kind of precision, but competitive gamers should appreciate it.

I should mention that the Rat seems almost too sensitive at times. About once a week, a piece of dust or a strand of cat hair manages to work its way into the sensor’s path and briefly mucks up tracking. Blowing on the sensor instantly solves the problem, but I’ve not encountered this issue with other mice on the exact same desk.

If the Rat feels a little too twitchy, it’s easy to tone down the sensitivity by adjusting the DPI via Cyborg’s Smart Technology programming app. Each of the four predefined levels can be set between 25 and 5600 DPI in gloriously granular 25-DPI increments. A similar level of control is offered over the precision aim percentage, which can be changed in 1% steps.

Five of the Rat’s buttons—the forward and back thumb buttons, both directions on the knob, plus middle-click on the mouse wheel—are subject to programming. The options on this front are extensive and frankly a little daunting for someone who spends most of his time playing first-person shooters that don’t require a lot of custom macros. Each button can be bound to a single keystroke, multiple concurrent keystrokes, or a complex sequence that combines both to speed your shopping spree in between Counter-Strike rounds. Grenade spammers will no doubt appreciate a “latched” mode that allows a single button press to trigger a rapid-fire repeat of a single keystroke. Press once to activate the repeat and a second time to turn it off.

Three modes give each configuration profile an added measure of on-the-fly adjustment. Multiple profiles can be created and saved, of course, and switching between them requires little more than right-clicking the Rat icon in the system tray.

I don’t play games seriously enough to exploit all the programmability and precision built into the Rat 7. However, I have been using the mouse exclusively on my desktop for the last several weeks now, and that included a number of extended gaming sessions with everything from Mirror’s Edge to Battlefield: Bad Company 2 to Alien Swarm. The verdict? It’s awesome.

Let’s start with the fit, which is better than any mouse I’ve ever used. Considering the range of adjustment options, that should really be a given. The Rat is more than a one-trick pony, though. It effortlessly glides across my desk and offers plenty of precision for detailed photo editing and more than enough responsiveness for my best attempts at twitch gaming. I did return to my Microsoft Wireless Laser Mouse 6000 to do some side-scrolling in Excel, but the tryst didn’t last. After using the Rat, the old mouse felt cheap, flimsy, and slow. I missed my tailored fit, and more than that, the fact that the Rat feels more like a precision instrument than a conventional PC peripheral.

Cyborg Gaming Rat 7

October 2010

Good tools rarely come cheap, but the Rat is reasonably affordable, all things considered. A couple of months after it debuted with a $100 suggested retail price, several online retailers have already knocked the Rat down to $80. Expect to pay closer to $130 for the Rat 9, which is identical save for a 2.4GHz wireless interface and extra weights. If that’s too rich for your blood, Rat 5 and 3 models are also available with lower DPI ratings and fewer adjustment options. They have less of what makes the Rat 7 special, though, and this formula gets considerably weaker when it’s watered down.

Besides, $80 really isn’t that much to spend on a mouse. This isn’t the sort of component you upgrade often, and if the Rat is as durable as it looks and feels, it should provide years of reliable service. We don’t often bust out our Editor’s Choice award here at TR, but the Rat 7 embodies all that it’s meant to reward: excellent performance, innovative design, and solid value.

Comments closed
    • Clint Torres
    • 9 years ago

    I had the rat for 2 days. I liked it okay but I still think my logitech MX Revolution had better ergonomics (for me, of course). I did like the tracking of the Rat. It was pretty smooth, relatively.

    My 10-year-old son wouldn’t stop bugging me about it, so I gave it to him. The Rat, that is.

    • Folk
    • 9 years ago

    I’m not sure what mousing surfaces this thing was tested on, but I can assure you that it’s a major FAIL on both the Icemat and both sides of the Rocketfish mouse pads. It pretty much dies when you set it on the Icemat, and with the Rocketfish it skips all over the place.

    Google Rat 7 + Icemat or Rocketfish and you’ll see plenty of other people in the same boat. If this thing won’t track on two popular gaming mouse pads, then why did they release it?

    • Freon
    • 9 years ago

    I bought one of these about a month ago and ended up returning it. It is the least ergonomic mouse I’ve used in ages. Luckily I bought it localled at Fry’s and got 100% refund. I had almost bought it on Newegg would would’ve cost me about $20 to return in total with shipping and restock. I’m back to using my old trusty MX518 which has nearly perfect ergonomics.

    Might as well just paste my Newegg review here:

    Pros: Good programming for macros. Moves smoothly as it has good sliders on bottom. Good precision up to 4800 dpi. I liked the included software. It worked well and was easy to setup everything. Macros are complex but the software seemed to make it as easy as it could given the power.
    Built like a brick outhouse. Has a thick (2-3mm?) stamped steel frame and base so feels very solid. Adjustment is easy. Extra pieces to swap is nice. I liked the extended pinky rest piece a lot.

    Cons: Poor ergonomics! Where do I start?
    Overall shape of mouse is a “V” and it wants to slide forward out of your hand as you grip it, even when adjusted. Very slick surfaces. Rubberized parts are not enough to save this issue.
    Mousewheel is too far forward. Left thumb buttons are too far forward. Not practical to hold where you can use both left thumb buttons and sniper button. Entire mouse is too wide.
    Mouse cursor jumps around on some surfaces at 5600dpi. It was fine at 4800dpi.
    Thumb barrel/roller is in a ridiculous position! You have to lift your hand out of the way to use it. You have to shift your entire grip to use it. Absurd.
    The adjustments really don’t help because the comfortable settings would just be out of range of the adjustments.
    I didn’t like any of the palm rests. All of them were too high up and didn’t extend far enough towards my wrist to help support my hand and aid in grip.
    I liked the extended pinky rest, but it didn’t have the extra rubber for grip.

    Other Thoughts: I returned mine (bought locally) after using it for about two and a half weeks.
    Macro programming could get you banned in some games like Starcraft 2. Like permabanned. Be careful!
    Lots of “customization” but this just doesn’t save it since a good setting is just way outside the adjustment ranges on all accounts. Ultimately the competing ergo mouses for half the price feel much, much better. I went back to my previous mouse. Very disappointed given all the buzz around this thing.
    Very heavy even with all weights removed. I liked it, but others may not like something so heavy. The weights seem to be small in relation to the base weight of the mouse, though I didn’t weigh it.
    Saitek had some neat ideas that look good on their own, but poor implementation and it didn’t come together well.

      • Bensam123
      • 9 years ago

      If you read the reviews you’d realize it’s made for people with bigger hands. If the Y shape spreads your hand too far apart, obviously your hand is so small that is appears as a Y to it rather then just meeting your fingers. I haven’t heard such bad things about it from people with bigger hands, like Geoff and plan to buy one on Newegg to test it out for myself.

    • Konstantine
    • 9 years ago

    Geoff,

    Does the mouse have a on board memory chip to store profiles for buttons assignments and macros, and does it have a button to switch between those profiles on the fly without the need to run the software?

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    Made in Cybertron.

    • Lazier_Said
    • 9 years ago

    You might die a virgin if….

    • swaaye
    • 9 years ago

    I’m still using two Logitech MX510 “gaming” mice from like 8 years ago. Very smooth.

    Actually I like the original MS Intellimouse Optical a lot too.

      • moritzgedig
      • 9 years ago

      I too use a Logitech,
      but mine is 12 years old: M-S48a
      still with the ball
      I never felt like I needed anything else although I have had an optical mouse since 6 years (Logitech M-6BJ58 )

    • EndlessWaves
    • 9 years ago

    So you can only adjust the length of the palm rest and the angle of the left side? That seems a bit pathetic and doesn’t address either of the problems I find most mice have, that the side buttons aren’t under my thumb and that the mouse isn’t wide or tall enough.

    I guess I’ll be sticking with my sidewinder for now

      • Dissonance
      • 9 years ago

      Nope. As the review points out, a second palm rest adds 4 mm of height to the mouse. The thumb rest’s fore/aft position is also adjustable, which should let you line up the thumb buttons just where you want them. The pinkie wing adds some effective width, too.

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    How about getting some more details specs, like what brand of laser it uses. Something more nitty-gritty would be nice. I know the laser my Lachesis uses skips every now and then and I’m on my second mouse as the first one went bad. I’d like to avoid it.

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 years ago

      What makes you think the brand of the laser is relevant? If your current laser mouse skips, it probably has more to do with the brand of the sensor… or the cleanliness of your mousing surface. (The wavelength of the laser might possibly be relevant, I guess, but I don’t know that is even listed in specs anywhere.)

        • cegras
        • 9 years ago

        The type of sensor involved (Avaga or something, Philip’s twin eye) has a factor on lift off distance … which is pretty crucial for low sens users.

        • Bensam123
        • 9 years ago

        Who says it’s not the laser? I meant sensor components in general, the hardware that actually matters for doing what is crucial for what the mouse does.

        How about putting aside the ‘are you sure the lens isn’t dirty’ and ‘are you sure using a mirror surface isn’t what’s causing it’ comments to discredit a credible statement someone makes. Any amount of technical benchmarking would be helpful when it comes to something like this.

        And yes, as far as I know, the Razer mice use a type of Philips sensor which blows nuts. They’ve been also using the same buttons (the actual switch) for years and they both go bad in time.

        It’s actually surprising given how much depth Geoff goes into on other articles that he couldn’t at least have teased that much out of the manufacturer instead of just the spec sheet people can find on their website. Other people are interested besides myself, scroll the comments.

    • vihad
    • 9 years ago

    Arrrg, this thing is soo heavy it’s definetely not for the competitive gamer.
    Having tried many gaming mouses (including Logitech G500, Microsoft X5, Razor copperhead) and having played Starcraft Brood War, Starcraft 2 and Counterstrike seriously (tournament play), Steel Series Xai (and Steel Series Ikari before that) are much better than the competition hands down. Apart from the phenomenal response, in which the Xai appears to be better than the G500 altough they have the same sensor, there are two things imho that make a world’s difference to the serious gamer (competitive).
    1) Weight, the Xai (and the Ikari) falls just short of 100 grams at 98. This compared to 145+ of other gaming mice without weights is sooo much better that it’s not even close. Competetive gamers like (there has been put extensive research into this) their mouse as light as possible, it results to less strain and better control.
    2) Huge mouse glides (that are interghangable), a huge plus because it results in less friction and a lesser effect of dust accumulating on them.
    Seriously

      • l33t-g4m3r
      • 9 years ago

      checked into that, looked good, but no dual-speed scroll wheel.

    • HisDivineShadow
    • 9 years ago

    Paid less for my Naga. Has more buttons, more functionality, doesn’t waste time on pointless mechanical gimmicks. Either your mouse fits your hand or it doesn’t. If it doesn’t, then hey… go find another one that does with an emphasis on features you’ll use every day. However, since I’m an adult and my hand won’t be… growing or shrinking, I don’t think I’ll need the option to resize my mouse once I’ve determined if it fits.

    I look at all those gaps, the spaces, the pieces, lines, etc, and I think of the day to day crud that builds up on peripherals you use constantly. On a mouse that is mostly smooth, I can clean it pretty well. On this thing? Wow, imagine trying to keep these little pieces, inside and out, that are will collect dust, etc.

    Also, I’d want a $80 (or less) mouse to be by a company I can trust to actively support its mice through several more OS upgrades. Do you trust Cyborg by Madcat to do that? Not me.

    Overall, this mouse compromises a lot of convenience to give you the option to resize the mouse when resizing a mouse is rarely useful after the initial checking to see if it’s the proper size for you, especially if there’s any effort required to do said resizing.

    • TaBoVilla
    • 9 years ago

    so does it come with aimbot included or what?

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    My g500 doesn’t need replaced yet.
    Also, the adjustable scroll wheel is very addictive. Once you have the ability to seamlessly scroll through webpages, you don’t want to go back.

    • Aphasia
    • 9 years ago

    So, the precision aiming button, is that a toogle, or a press and hold kindof deal? Because I cant stand the press and hold kindof things that some game uses for such things.

      • Dissonance
      • 9 years ago

      Press and hold, which can be a little awkward depending on whether you use one of the other thumb buttons to zoom.

        • Aphasia
        • 9 years ago

        Thanks for the info.

        Thats definitely a deal-breaker for me. Cant stand holding something, especially since playing recon/sniper is the main pastime in FPS games for me. Its annoying enough with the bugged mortars in BC2 that requires a secondary-hold since the last patch.

        Guess I’ll hold on to my G5 Laser v2 for a while longer. Should be a pure driver issue, so who knows.

    • indeego
    • 9 years ago

    -[

      • Dissonance
      • 9 years ago

      Really, indeego, /[

      • d0g_p00p
      • 9 years ago

      You can find the answers to both your questions if you read the review.

      edit: Looks like Geoff beat me to it.

      • UberGerbil
      • 9 years ago

      Ah, yes, calluses. The leading cause of death and disability amongst computer-users worldwide — and almost as dangerous to TR threads as ready-fire-aim comments.

        • indeego
        • 9 years ago

        I don want ’em. They get in the wayg{<.<}g

    • Majiir Paktu
    • 9 years ago

    Did you test a gaming mouse on a desk surface and not a mousepad? If so, might your complaints about dust be a bit inconclusive?

    • Rectal Prolapse
    • 9 years ago

    edit: oops

    • Rectal Prolapse
    • 9 years ago

    Very nice review! Damn, now I’m thinking of getting one…

    • jalex3
    • 9 years ago

    looks cool, i did want it. but after reviews and seeing the roccat kone plus, this is a toy. i suggest you look at the mouse on roccats site.

      • Meadows
      • 9 years ago

      Greetings, Roccat Advertiser. We don’t care.

        • jalex3
        • 9 years ago

        if you did not care about poeple opions then you would not read a review for a mouse, you would go read the specs, i will say that i think the kone plus is a great mouse if i want. i only do i because its worth other people taking a look at.

    • Chrispy_
    • 9 years ago

    Geoff,

    I’m giant-pawed and notoriously fussy about mice – having owned almost every gamer-oriented offering from Logitech/Razer/Microsoft in the last decade.

    The “middle-click” funcionality of mice seems to be becoming less and less tolerable with each new mouse, yet it’s the best placed button location after left/right click.

    Does this mouse also sacrifice clickability of the wheel for fancy tilt/scroll features, or can I drop £100 on a mouse and feel happy about that?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 years ago

      Yeah, smooth-scrolling mouse wheels and very stiff action make for terrible middle-button clickability. I only buy mice that I can test out in a B&M store first for that reason.

        • l33t-g4m3r
        • 9 years ago

        My g500 does very well in that regard.

      • Dissonance
      • 9 years ago

      Middle click works well… although there’s no tilt/side scrolling to interfere.

        • Bensam123
        • 9 years ago

        Clicker wheel FTW. I don’t know why smooths are showing up on gaming mice. Possibly so you can flick it really fast and scroll through all your weapons a bunch of times for fun?

        That is the sole reason I don’t own a G9. Even if you can switch it to a click scroll, the none ribbed wheel feels slippery. Tactile is everything when it comes to inputs.

    • cybot_x1024
    • 9 years ago

    The mouse of my dreams!!!
    Only if i was getting this for my birthday on monday :-/

    • spiritwalker2222
    • 9 years ago

    Until I saw this mouse, I never realized that your palm was suppose to rest on the mouse. They must use a midget’s hand for the generic mouses (that I’ve used), cause their tiny.

    • Thrashdog
    • 9 years ago

    I’ve been looking for something to replace my aged MX510 (which has seen so much use that the seats for the slick pads on the bottom have been sanded off), and I have to say that this looks *really* nice. If only my Cyborg Evo joystick hadn’t kicked the can, it’d be the perfect combination!

    • PenGun
    • 9 years ago

    WTB make nice seats. I have one on my brand new Norco Jubei 2. A Brooks seat is unbeatable however and I’ll get one soon..

    I like trackballs.

    • Meadows
    • 9 years ago

    g{

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 years ago

      dude. you’re a dude. don’t get offended. everyone knows you have a wiener.

        • Meadows
        • 9 years ago

        Still improper writing style.

          • Tamale
          • 9 years ago

          actually that’s correct according to college english professors and APA guidelines.. most people simply don’t talk / write that way.

            • Meadows
            • 9 years ago

            Edit: I can hardly believe that a plurality discrepancy is academically accepted.

            At most, one might even think this is sexist.

      • spiritwalker2222
      • 9 years ago

      Ya, it doesn’t look like it extends out enough to fit.

        • dashbarron
        • 9 years ago

        Rather it’s right or not, I think what we can all agree on is that you are being anal. An expert grammarian once told me, that regardless of what the grammar-Nazi’s and the rule book say, grammar and language change. People don’t want to let go of their old ways of what they were taught and are afraid of change. The way we speak is dramatically differen than the way it is written sometimes. We have to learn that it is changing.

          • KeillRandor
          • 9 years ago

          Yep – the ONLY thing that matters is the understanding and recognition of the meaning of what you say.

          If the use of words and grammar gets in the way of THAT, then you’ve got problems…

          I don’t think that’s the case here, TBH…

          (Now, calling puzzles, games, OTOH….).

    • wira020
    • 9 years ago

    Looks nice and I like the concept.. was kinda worried if it’s not sturdy enough because of the many adjustable parts.. cant wait to see what will they come up next.. adjustable keyboard maybe?..

    • BoBzeBuilder
    • 9 years ago

    Looks like this mouse could transform into a batmobile anytime.

    • thesmileman
    • 9 years ago

    I can’t find anywhere to try one of these out. I have hands which are much much bigger than any mouse I have ever tried and I don’t think this look like it will be long enough or wide enough for me. I guess like most other things in this world custom only extends so far. I didn’t think being 6’6″ is really that big but apparently it is.

    • Xenolith
    • 9 years ago

    I have one of these. Very pleased with it. I am a big fan of the industrial look of it. I too, on occasion sit back an admire it. Really is a work of art.

    The main thing it has helped is no more pinky drag. Actually I had problems with both pinky and ring finger dragging.

    Seems more precise than my Death Adder… got rid of some of my “yips”, although I am still not a good sniper.

    • Spotpuff
    • 9 years ago

    I really wanted to pick one of these up so thanks for doing a review.

    I don’t really care about looks so much as comfort.

    • tay
    • 9 years ago

    Looks great. Does the laser sensor skip? i wish this mouse came with an LED sensor.

      • kasakone1000
      • 9 years ago

      Yeah. I really wish these mouse tests put some effort into actually testing the sensor.

      “I gamed for hours on several games” is not a test. You don’t test a GPU by stating “I watched a movie and played some games using it”.

      He however did state the specs the manufacturer promises, but I think from other computer hardware we should have learned that the promise is not always what the product actually performs.

        • Bensam123
        • 9 years ago

        I agree…

    • flip-mode
    • 9 years ago

    Ambidexterity fail. No sale. The concept is interesting and the build quality is admirable.

      • Chrispy_
      • 9 years ago

      Actually, left-handed people who can’t use a mouse with their right hand fail.

      All right-handed mouse users are already using both hands, and they don’t seem to complain. Neither do stick-shift drivers, neither do most musicians.

      Using a PC is a two-handed task, you don’t get pianos with the high notes on the left and you don’t get stick-shift cars with sticks anywhere other than in the middle. Coming from a family with lefties, I can vouch that lefties making a fuss are just fussy and pedantic.

      Ambidextrous is one of the minimum system requirements for Real Life 2.0, get used to it….

        • Meadows
        • 9 years ago

        Reality 2.0? I got Sam’s goggles somewhere here.

        • MethylONE
        • 9 years ago

        “Actually, left-handed people who can’t use a mouse with their right hand fail.

        All right-handed mouse users are already using both hands, and they don’t seem to complain. Neither do stick-shift drivers, neither do most musicians.

        Using a PC is a two-handed task, you don’t get pianos with the high notes on the left and you don’t get stick-shift cars with sticks anywhere other than in the middle. Coming from a family with lefties, I can vouch that lefties making a fuss are just fussy and pedantic.

        Ambidextrous is one of the minimum system requirements for Real Life 2.0, get used to it….”

        BRAVO!!!

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 years ago

      Ambidexterity is over-rated. A mouse built for one hand or the other is way, way, way better than a mouse that’s perfectly symmetrical. Better feel, better ergonomics, better everything. There are plenty of lefty mice from Logitech, Razer, etc. Get one of them.

      • swaaye
      • 9 years ago

      I’m mostly left handed but I use a mouse with my right hand. I’ve been thinking that I should probably refer to myself as “no-handed”. 😀 I’m just too mixed up to declare it either way and my handwriting with my left hand is not exactly beautiful. I can’t write at all with my right hand though.

    • Spyder22446688
    • 9 years ago

    It just *looks* so damn uncomfortable. Almost like a medieval torture device. The “hand rack.”

      • Nutmeg
      • 9 years ago

      Agreed. Ergonomics whut?

      I have yet to find a more comfortable mouse than my MX518.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 9 years ago

        Well if we are to take their word it is able to become the most confortable mouse ever, a awesome proposition. I’m just sad newegg is freshout out of all rat 9 mice.

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 9 years ago

    This looks like the Darth Vader of mice, with adjustable maw size and changeable cape length. Maybe I’ll look at it when my M$ Bluetooth Laser 8000 kicks the bucket. It’s lasted almost 5 years already, longer than Darth Vader’s average body suit, and is still going strong.

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