AMD’s SB800-series fan speed controller exposed

As TR’s resident motherboard reviewer, I’ve poked around in a lot of BIOSes over the past decade or so. They’ve come a long way in that time, adding integrated flashing utilities, support for multiple configuration profiles, and, of course, the ability to tweak a staggering array of memory timings, clock speeds, and voltages. On the overclocking front, we’ve long passed the point of diminishing returns. Any halfway-decent motherboard BIOS has more than enough clock and voltage ranges for enthusiasts, and most go above and beyond what even truly extreme liquid-nitrogen-fueled overclockers might require.

PC enthusiasts have always had a bit of an obsession with maximizing performance, so it’s no surprise motherboard makers have lavished us with a wealth of overclocking and performance tweaking options. Few seem to have picked up on the fact that we also want our rigs to be as quiet as possible, though. The fan speed controls available in most modern BIOSes are basic at best and often laughably inadequate when compared to the frankly excessive overclocking options being offered.

This argument might sound familiar because I’ve been grinding this axe for a while now. I went off on a bit of a rant on the subject more than a year and a half ago, and little has changed since. Of the big three, only Asus has made real progress in improving BIOS-level fan speed controls, and it still has a long way to go to match what now-defunct mobo maker Abit was doing more than seven years ago. MSI’s fan speed controls remain limited but continue to offer at least some tuning options, while Gigabyte’s are still shockingly nonexistent. So, imagine my delight when, at AMD’s Technical Forum in Taipei last week, I came across a presentation on the fan speed controls enabled by the company’s current generation of south-bridge chips.

Motherboard manufacturers typically rely on SuperIO chips or other auxiliary silicon to adjust fan speeds based on system temperatures. Putting this functionality in the chipset certainly makes sense, but has AMD implemented the sort of functionality enthusiasts might want?

Oh yes—and in spades.

The SB800 family of south-bridge silicon has an integrated microcontroller that, with a little help from firmware built into a system’s BIOS, can offer more control over that system’s fans than has ever graced a motherboard. The microcontroller can manage fan speeds using three algorithms: step, linear, and non-linear. In step mode, fan speeds jump from one value to the next as temperatures rise. The linear algorithm smooths things out, allowing fan speeds to ramp, well, linearly between predefined minimum and maximum values. Combine the two, and you have a non-linear approach that’s really more multi-linear. This method drapes a string of linear slopes across multiple step points.

I couldn’t not graph them. This is TR.

Linear mode is most akin to what’s available in contemporary BIOSes, although users aren’t always able to set minimum and maximum temperature thresholds and fan speeds. Step mode is a little like the old-school high/low fan options that used to be prevalent before linear controls emerged. Instead of being limited to single high and low values, AMD’s step mode can accommodate no fewer than eight predefined fan speeds and corresponding temperatures. Non-linear mode is just as flexible, allowing users to configure as many slopes as they can steps.

There’s plenty of granularity, too. Fan speeds can be set in 1% increments, and temperature triggers can be adjusted 1°C at a time, giving users plenty of opportunity to perfect the effective shapes of their fan speed curves.

Single- vs. dual-sensor modes. Source: AMD

In addition to the three algorithms that determine how fan speeds respond to temperature changes, the SB800 series is governed by single- and dual-sensor policies that dictate how temperatures are interpreted. Single-sensor mode relies on only one temperature sensor, while the dual-sensor scheme takes in two inputs and will set the fan speed based on the higher of the two. Dual-sensor mode is designed primarily for motherboards with passively cooled north-bridge chips that rely on airflow generated by the CPU fan. In those cases, the thermal diode built into AMD’s north-bridge silicon can be used as a secondary temperature input.

A view of the SB800 series’ fan control inputs and outputs. Source: AMD

The SB800 series has inputs for three thermal diodes alongside the SMBus interface it uses to read the CPU’s digital temperature sensor. Why so many? Because the south bridge can monitor and power no fewer than five individual fans. Each one can have its own profile, and 3- and 4-pin fans are supported across the board.

All this functionality is offered for free in every SB800-series south bridge, with no additional hardware required. Motherboard makers need only to connect fan and diode traces to the south bridge and implement the necessary BIOS hooks to give users access to fan control variables. But none have. AMD’s Ali Akbar Merrikh, the man who designed the fan speed controls and patiently answered my questions about them, isn’t aware of any motherboard that exploits the SB800’s fancy fan controller outside the company’s own boards and reference designs, none of which are available to consumers. That’s a travesty, because this is exactly the sort of fan speed control that I’m sure many an enthusiast would love to have in his motherboard’s BIOS. In fact, I’d wager that most of us would happily trade the ability to tweak obscure memory timings and system voltages for such robust fan control functionality.

Props to Merrikh and AMD for incorporating such powerful fan control support in the south bridge, and shame on any motherboard maker that leaves this particular feature untapped in favor of alternative fan control mechanisms that offer less, well, control.

Comments closed
    • pot
    • 9 years ago

    I’ve been a big fan, pun intended, of fan control options in the BIOS. Some motherboards have real basic functionality while some of have been excellent. Some of the best implementations I’ve seen over the years on enthusiast boards were SOME aBit (RIP), ASUS and nForce boards. Glad to see AMD is working on making fan control even better.

    • Dirge
    • 9 years ago

    What can I say…. nice work AMD. This should allow allot of tweaking of quite builds.

    • moritzgedig
    • 9 years ago

    I think the control theory in this article is week.
    some fan controls I have had tended to swing.

    • Bensam123
    • 9 years ago

    This is appalling. I’ve never understood why there are different board makers and people who produce the northbridge chips don’t make their own motherboards. I agree that diversity is a very good thing to have, but largely motherboards all seem the same more or less, like video cards. Although video cards are much less diverse, motherboard makers are like the middleman that soaks up money.

    It’s sad that motherboard makers rather implement their own half assed version of something that is superior and built into chipsets just so they can put a fancy buzzword on it and call it theirs. It was the same way with nvidia chipsets that supported so many features, just motherboard makers didn’t or refused to implement them. It was ridiculous how many options those chipsets had on the ‘show’ boards that nvidia sent out.

    I’m not entirely sure why AMD doesn’t produce their own ‘basic’ motherboards that supports all their features of their chipsets and set it as a baseline, sort of like Intel does only they don’t make the effort to spruce it up a little.

    On a more related note, I was sad to see Abit go under. They were the soul source of all my motherboard purchases (for myself) for the last 8 or so years. I really loved their fan controls and I looked for it when I switched motherboard makers. The best I found was DFI, but they decided to sink their flagship as well.

      • fantastic
      • 9 years ago

      I really doubt there’s a large profit margin on most motherboards. They seem fairly cheap for all of the different components. I remember paying much more for less in the past.

      I do agree that it’s sad that motherboard manufacturers don’t implement AMD’s fan controller. Tacking on extra chips when the on-board functionality already exits doesn’t make sense. Except in cases where the chipsets fail, like some USB, ethernet and Firewire chips… Intel, VIA and AMD all come to mind.

    • ronch
    • 9 years ago

    Kudos to AMD for thinking about this one, but shouldn’t they concentrate on making faster processors instead of making such a big fuss about fan controllers? I mean, you can argue all you want that we don’t need $999-processors and all that, but the fact remains that AMD is already behind Intel both in terms of architectural performance and manufacturing technology (GF is just a way to take the load off AMD’s shoulders, but in the end, GF is still AMD’s primary manufacturing partner and AMD can’t go to Intel and tell them to churn out smaller chips for them). And those things do matter. If AMD can’t show that it can keep up with whatever Intel is selling they’ll just keep on living in Intel’s shadow while Intel racks in the cash. And that’s exactly what’s happening right now. Apart from the ATI division and the yet-to-be-proven Bulldozer core, AMD isn’t being anything other than a cheaper alternative while its chips actually cost more to build. And that just isn’t good for them in the long run.

    • Zoomer
    • 9 years ago

    Geoff, would it be possible to get some specs or documentation from your source? Things like which pins correspond to which in/out, voltage/current max/mins, all methods of programming the fan controller.

    I’m wondering if it’s possible to set it up after the fact. Solder on!

    • Krogoth
    • 9 years ago

    I don’t understand the fuss.

    People who care about fan controllers already got a dedicated unit that puts any motherboard implementation to shame.

    The silence crowd avoids fans as much as possible. If they there “forced” to use fans. They do their research and get large, low-dB units.

    For the rest of us, we get by without the need for fancy fan controllers.

      • Bensam123
      • 9 years ago

      And this is a feature built into a southbridge that doesn’t need a dedicated controller and even works if you only have one fan because you’re part of the silent crowd.

      I’m not entirely sure what there is to get. It’s win-win.

    • albundy
    • 9 years ago

    as an enthused enthusiast, i always say, the quieter the better at the highest performance possible. i could care less that my heatsink takes up half my mainboard. its got a nice juicy 140mm fan that is whisper quiet and does the job on most o/c’s. i really would have no need to adjust its speed.

    • anotherengineer
    • 9 years ago

    Maybe if Sapphire gets into the mobo buisness they will implement this. What a shame to have such a great feature going to waste.

    Stupid mobo manufacturers.

    No reason it shouldnt be available on all mobo’s

    • Thanato
    • 9 years ago

    The concept of automated fan controllers is a bit strange. Most people buy / most companies make fans that are quiet and move a lot of air. So it seems strange to want to control that. Quiet and powerfull fans can just be on at 100% power all the time. A fan controller would just allow a system of be hotter in idle and in return save very little on noise. Id rather have a pc that’s as cool as it can get and as quiet as it can be at all times.

    Now I’m sure there are fans that are really loud, but I’ve never seen reviews of em. Checking newegg 120mm fans I found two 120mm fans that are loud and move more than 110cfm most of the 170 other fans are in the 20 dBA and 80cfm or lower ranges. Among all of those fans only 1 seems good for a fan controller as rps go up to 4000, all others are around 2000 or less.

    If these fans can be “overclocked” beyond their specs then I can see a need for sophisticated fan controllers that use value curves of temps. Now if fans can be overclocked then temp sensors aren’t really needed a fan control system could just use system power draw as a measure of how to control fans.

      • Stargazer
      • 9 years ago

      q[

        • Thanato
        • 9 years ago

        Your not getting me. for arguments sake 20dba is low enough.

        example 1
        If one owns fans that produce 90 cmf’s at 20 dBA’s and 20 dBA’s is very very quiet, then there is no need for a fan controller because it would just raise the idle temp of a pc. and there is no point in that when the pc is already quiet. There are a lot of fans like this for sale.

        example 2
        Now if you have fans that produce say 160 cmf’s at 60 dBA’s then that is very loud. great for pc overclocking and those fans will need a fan controller for audio sake. But there and very few fans for sale that do that. and if you do drop those fans to speeds that keep the audio at 20 dBA’s then there’s a very good chance those fans will produce a lot less than 90 cmf’s.

        example 3
        Now if you have stock fans that say produce 70 cmf’s at 30dBA’s then one would be better off buying new fans than using a fan control system to save an extra 10 dBA’s.

          • Thanato
          • 9 years ago

          If I could overclock fans that have a great cmf/dBA ratio to higher than factory spec rpms then that’s the fan controller will be worth having.

          • Stargazer
          • 9 years ago

          q[

            • Thanato
            • 9 years ago

            Fan controllers can only slow fans down to reduce noise, having a temp sensor to turn the fan on full when the pc gets hot is mostly pointless with already quiet and powerful fans.
            for exmaple 1
            a cpu is 30c idle 70c load with fans at 100%
            with controller it will be maybe 50c idle then 70c load
            might save 6dba. if you have a lot of 20dba fans then maybe it can be a little useful. I would think it’s not worth it.

            I don’t get where we are in disagreement? Most products are designed to be effctive and quiet. making fan controllers relativity useless. If there where more fans on the market that need controllers then I think motherboard makers would care about these chipset features.

            • Stargazer
            • 9 years ago

            What’s the difference between “overclocking” a 90 cfm/20 dBA fan to x cfm/y dBA and slowing down a x cfm/y dBA fan until you get 90 cfm/20 dBA? In both cases you’re able to get two different noise/cooling profiles for different situations.

            Having controllable fan speeds gives you more flexibility in the noise/cooling trade-off. People value noise and cooling differently (and the requirements vary from case to case), and there are a lot of people who would love to reduce their computer’s sound output by 6dBA. Others just wouldn’t bother. It’s a subjective trade-off.

            Lots of people wouldn’t want (or “need”) the flexibility offered by fan controllers, but others do.

            • Thanato
            • 9 years ago

            Looking at fans online I’ve noticed most of the high rpm fans like 4000 rpm fans have fan blades designed for high rpm use, and at slower rpm say 2000 the cfm/dba ratio wouldn’t be as good as fans designed for 2000 rpm’s. Silverstone makes fans go to 2600 rmps but still at slower rpm’s they might not be as good as Noctua’s fans when you match rpm’s. I’ve never seen any reviews that test fans outputs and different speed, which would be neat.

            If a fan controller could make a fan go faster than it’s designed for then that would be fun for me. Also Having a controller that looked at power use and temp would be great for dealing with cpu’s that have turbo features etc, and they would help add a little performance by keeping the temp down a little sooner, but it’s not a big deal. Using a fan controller makes your pc hotter but quieter. One can also underclock and undervolt a cpu for to save temp as well but that’s not why one upgrades a pc. That’s what controllers do to fans they slow down fans. That’s what I mean about overclocking a fan, make it go faster. Push that Noctua to 2600 rpm’s, burn out the motor, now that’s a controller worth having.

            Over all I can’t see why motherboard makers should care a lot about fan controllers. It’s not a big deal, it’s mostly a fun feature that could be more of a pain in the ass to make than it’s worth.

            • MrJP
            • 9 years ago

            /[<"I've never seen any reviews that test fans outputs and different speed, which would be neat."<]/ Go and look at the fan review section of §[<http://www.silentpcreview.com<]§. Noise vs. heat is always going to be a trade-off, and having more tools available to tune the trade can be nothing but a good thing, especially if they come free with the motherboard. In my case my system is cool and effectively silent in everyday use, but requires higher fan settings when gaming to keep temperatures to acceptable levels. I'm using an aftermarket solution, but an integrated option would have been far simpler. Note I'm using Scythe S-Flex fans, so it's certainly not a question of the fan quality. It all comes down to the difference in power usage between idle and full load, and for a gaming PC this can easily be 300W.

            • Bensam123
            • 9 years ago

            Because it could be ‘quieter’ when you aren’t using it and ‘cooler’ when you are using it.

            Those fans that operate ‘quietly’ and move a lot of air, could also operate ‘quieter’ when they don’t need to.

            There really isn’t a whole lot to get here. You seem to have a all or nothing approach and I don’t understand it. You win in both cases. If you have louder fans to move a lot of air, then they’re quieter when they don’t need to. If you have quiet fans that operate good enough, then they will be quieter when you don’t need to move air.

            I’m not sure how turning down fan speed will raise system temperatures as you mentioned. The chips themselves monitor system temperature and adjust the fans accordingly. By the very nature of them they offer your computer a cooler environment and a quieter one as they’re dynamic.

            You may be thinking of some GPUs that used to adjust fan speed based on load. Those are largely obsolete though and they were stupid to begin with.

            • eitje
            • 9 years ago

            q[http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/adding-decibel-d_63.html<]§ ...27 dBA.

            • Pegasus
            • 9 years ago

            10dB louder would be perceived as twice as loud.

            I’m glad 5 fans @ 20dB doesn’t equal 100dB…
            §[<http://www.gcaudio.com/resources/howtos/loudness.html<]§ And I'd only be able to be at my pc for 2 hrs! D:

    • Stargazer
    • 9 years ago

    Control like that would be awesome. I hope that MB manufacturers will start taking advantage of it.

      • Thanato
      • 9 years ago

      moved to a new thread

        • Thanato
        • 9 years ago

        Oops I meant to start a new thread.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 9 years ago

    The youthful idealist in me wants to take up arms and join the fan speed control crusade, but the realist in me just goes *meh* and buys a $10 fan speed controller, makes up some resistor or diode-based fan speed controls, or just buys the correct speed fans in the first place. Maybe I just don’t care enough to get worked up over it because there are those simple options and maybe it’s that the only fan I can abide varying speeds in my system is the graphics card because when gaming there is enough noise to drown it out (well, not always but…) – varying speed system and CPU fans drive me nuts, I prefer to find a noise level I’m ok with and tweak overclocks etc from there or vice versa, I’d just rather have constant case and CPU fan speeds than one that’s varying all over the place.

      • Skrying
      • 9 years ago

      This is pretty much how I feel. Just buy the correct speed fans in the first place.

        • Voldenuit
        • 9 years ago

        On some cases with 200mm and 180mm fans, buying an aftermarket fan is not a trivial exercise.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 9 years ago

          There is a very simple solution to that self-created problem – just don’t buy them. :p

          I’d figure you’re better off locking those at a low speed, anyways. A helicopter fan large enough to cause the case to vibrate is not something I’d want ramping up and down. A dinkier CPU fan ought to be the only thing that really calls for dynamic control.

          Also, those huge fans can increase power draw at the outlet by 5-10w, even at low speeds. It makes me stop and think about whether they’re really moving enough air compared to a decent 140mm fan, considering that they may actually be contributing several extra watts of heat.

      • Stargazer
      • 9 years ago

      Being able to (at least) have one set of fan speeds for “idle” and one for “load” would be nice. That way you could set the limits so that the fan speeds don’t go up and down all the time, but only during significant changes in power usage. By using a gradual increase/decrease in fan speeds you could also avoid any sudden changes (and those are the ones that tend to be the most annoying).

    • Delta_9
    • 9 years ago

    Nice features not being used on the desktop, wonder if any notebook manufacturers are using them to manage thermals and acoustics.

    • l33t-g4m3r
    • 9 years ago

    Wow. That’s unbelievably stupid of the manufacturers.
    If even one was to make a board that used this functionality, that would have in itself drawn people toward it, and then forced the others to follow suit.
    IMO, there’s some sort of collusion going on here, kind of like the d-ram price fixing scam against rambus.

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      Of course there is. These are motherboard manufacturers. They’re always “colluding” to cut every corner possible because they don’t make squat selling large, complex PCBs, loaded with numerous capacitors, connectors, copper, and expensive controller chips, all for under $100.

      Meanwhile, they get to sit there and watch as people use these very same boards to plug in $100+ hunks of sand from Intel and AMD, who they already paid quite a bit for their “chipsets,” which, from here on out, are actually just going to be dinky southbridges, but still sold at the same price.

      So are they screwing us, or are Intel and AMD screwing them? :p

        • eitje
        • 9 years ago

        Businesses don’t deserve simpathy.

    • Palek
    • 9 years ago

    This is very similar to how many-many motherboard makers continue to use external Ethernet PHY chips or full-blown Ethernet controllers (sometimes of the PCI connected variety – ugh) even though most modern chipsets have fully functional Ethernet controllers (including PHYs) integrated. Old habits die hard? Pure laziness? ROI?

    • flip-mode
    • 9 years ago

    The bottom line: AMD giveth, and mobo makers pisseth away.

    • dpaus
    • 9 years ago

    I thought this was Sparta?

    • crabjokeman
    • 9 years ago

    AMD: just force mobo makers to enable PWM on fans other than the CPU fan. If you leave it up to mobo makers to put controls in the BIOS, they will screw it up more often than not or make a bunch of fancy-looking, nearly useless Windows-only utilites to control fans.

    • shank15217
    • 9 years ago

    Its pretty simple, motherboard makers are trying to position INTEL boards as the definitive high end and AMD as the budget enthusiast and budget enthusiasts don’t care about fancy fan controls *rolls eyes*. This is yet another example where system integrators and main board manufacturers are screwing AMDs platform in light of the ‘faster’ alternative. AMDs nile platform turned out be a whimper and now it seems AMDs extremely powerful chip sets are hampered by ‘budget’ designs as well. It just seems that the industry is bent on having just one high end platform. AMD struggles to value add any enthusiast features to their platform when their processors aren’t on top, that’s sad for the consumer and even worse for AMD.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 9 years ago

      Or maybe they are just being business people doing what businesses do and putting resources toward whatever is most profitable?

        • shank15217
        • 9 years ago

        I’m not denying that…

    • jcw122
    • 9 years ago

    Great to hear that AMD took control, instead of letting mobo manufacs screw around.

      • shank15217
      • 9 years ago

      AMD didn’t take control, they lost control.

    • Freon
    • 9 years ago

    Definitely nice that AMD is building a nice controll into their southbridge. If the logic can be loaded into the southbridge all the better.

    I’m plenty happy with a 2 point linear if I can set the points. I definitely want to be able to set the points on the CPU. Some kinda of options on case fans is enough.

    I was happy enough with my P5Q Pro which had 2 point linear with adjustable points and preset modes for some of the case fan headers. Less than that disappointing, more would be a bonus.

    • wibeasley
    • 9 years ago

    In stats, the term “piecewise” is typically used to describe the red function. Is “multi-linear/non-linear” an engineering term?

    If somebody else uses another term, I’d be interested to know what’s your field.

    • wibeasley
    • 9 years ago

    Geoff, when you say “4-pin”, do you mean PVM or molex?

      • Dissonance
      • 9 years ago

      PWM 😉

      • wibeasley
      • 9 years ago

      Ooo, that’s even better when the standard actually exists.

    • cegras
    • 9 years ago

    A shame, since for a very long time I’ve been resorting to Speedfan to get that exact same functionality.

    • Deanjo
    • 9 years ago

    I doubt you will see wide spread implementation until boards start implementing UEFI. By then we could possibly see a revised chipset. Also I notice that the diagrams show a AM3R2 system which is possibly an indicator of when this will be possible. Guess we will have to just wait for AM3R2 boards to appear.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 9 years ago

      What does EFI have to do with stuff that already exists and can be (apparently quite easily) implemented in a standard BIOS?

    • MixedPower
    • 9 years ago

    – Rant Warning –

    Why are the motherboard makers being so regressive on fan speed control? I am very disappointed with my P55-USB3 and its dearth of options on this front. The only BIOS level control I have is between auto and a set speed over the CPU header. You have to install Gigabyte’s pointless utility to get temperature-based control on it, and even then there is no control at all offered on any other header!

    And while I’m being unranting on the topic of BIOS options, why on earth did Gigabyte decide that I can only adjust the memory voltages by tenths of a volt at a time? There are tons of DDR3 modules that require a voltage amount in granularities of .05 (e.g. 1.35 & 1.65) which can’t be taken advantage of, while there are options in the BIOS to go well over two volts, which nobody will ever use. These companies are just shoveling features into the BIOS with no regard to their usefulness.

      • sigher
      • 9 years ago

      The voltage control thing is because you bought a budget board I expect.

        • OneArmedScissor
        • 9 years ago

        A “budget” P55…that’s a cute idea, considering that most manufacturers start them at over $100 and they pretty much universally have crossfire support and things of that nature.

        No, it’s just laziness and a blatant disregard of use.

        • MixedPower
        • 9 years ago

        Granted it’s a “budget” P55 board, but it should still support voltages for common memory modules. After checking my BIOS again it seems the voltages do get more granular, but that’s only after 1.5v (useless to me as I have 1.35v RAM) and it still doesn’t have a 1.65v option, by far the most prevalent voltage option of DDR3 (at least according to Newegg). Of course, the board is more than happy to allow you to set a voltage between 2.0-2.6v in .02v increments. Which is completely useless to practically every overclocker, let alone anyone who would buy a “budget” motherboard.

        EDIT: Too many commas

    • SomeOtherGeek
    • 9 years ago

    l[

      • sigher
      • 9 years ago

      To suggest you need to trade is a bit ludicrous, BIOS has room to spare these days.
      And if you are so eager that you are willing to trade a kidney then goto any computer store and buy a fancontroller and you got what you want, and you can even keep it across any new system you might buy later

        • flip-mode
        • 9 years ago

        Hey, are you looking for the point? It’s waaaaay over yonder. Keep looking, you’ll find it.

    • Bauxite
    • 9 years ago

    WTF, you’re telling me my 890gx htpc/media server could have FIVE fully controlled 3 or 4-pin fans if not for all the vendors totally failing?!

    I went to a lot of annoying adapters and such to wire up all my fans, most are on dumb fat molex power y-cables and use a resistor to be slow and quiet. Tying up all that extra wiring sucked a big one.

      • sigher
      • 9 years ago

      The chips they put in to control fans very often already get underutilized and offer more control than the mobo makers route on their mobo’s, that’s been going on on all platforms, this is just a new thing to not use.

    • dlenmn
    • 9 years ago

    Can you get a response from manufactures about why they used this controller? Perhaps there is a legitimate reason, but — you’re right — it sounds like a travesty.

      • flip-mode
      • 9 years ago

      Bumping. Good question. Geoff? Response from mfrs?

      • OneArmedScissor
      • 9 years ago

      Lol what do you expect them to say?

      Manufacturers: “We don’t care what you want, because you’re going to buy it, anyways.”

      This is why I stopped caring about desktops. The prospect of “unlimited control” at the hardware level has been dashed, while software pretty much gives you the same level of control, even on laptops…which also don’t have things like unfathomable noise and heat issues to begin with.

        • adam1378
        • 9 years ago

        Curmudgeon. Please don’t turn your back on the desktop, it brought you such joy in years past.

          • OneArmedScissor
          • 9 years ago

          That is true, but things just don’t work the way they used to and it’s going to keep moving further in that direction. More often than not, whatever remains of “adjustable” desktops has been giving me trouble instead of an easily accessible solution to a problem.

          Once the ability to adjust the system bus speed is crippled, that will pretty much be the final nail in the coffin. DIY desktops will have pretty much become just hot, noisy versions of what OEMs are selling.

          Ironically, whatever seemingly wonderful idea some fancy new desktop parts have given me in the last year or so always turned out to be something extremely similar to a laptop…just bigger, more expensive, using several times as much electricity, and without a battery.

          But fear not, for this is the internets, and now I will just find something new to complain about, like bad laptop screens and dinky batteries!

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