A month with Asus’ Eee Pad Transformer

As a child, most of my Sunday afternoons were spent on the couch with my dad, a massive bowl of popcorn, and episodes of Star Trek: The Next Generation. I’d been a fan of the original series, but when things moved over to the NC-1701-D, I was old enough to have a deeper appreciation for the technological marvels that the future might hold—and a total crush on Tasha Yar. Warp drives, holodecks, and transporters will probably always remain in the realm of science fiction during my lifetime. However, one rather prominent gadget from Picard’s ready room has already arrived.

While sipping his Earl Grey tea, the captain could often be seen with a tablet in hand. Little did I know it at the time, but this device would materialize in my gadget-buying prime. The future is now, it seems. If you listen to the hype, tablets would appear to be our new computing overlords. The numbers show that slates are pushing netbooks out of the North American market, and the wild success of Apple’s iPads can’t be ignored. With childhood bewilderment in tow, I just had to see what all the fuss was about.

But I couldn’t bring myself to buy an iPad. I’ll be honest; I’m not a fan of a lot of things that Apple does, from its business and marketing practices to the walled garden that makes the Steve Jobs Reality Distortion Field all the more difficult to escape. That’s not what stopped me from picking up the tablet everyone’s been talking about, though. Instead, it was the arrival of Asus’ Eee Pad Transformer.

We caught our first glimpse of the Transformer back in January at the Consumer Electronics show, and the one thing that stuck with me from that unveiling was the asking price: $400 for the base 16GB model, or $100 less than an equivalent iPad. Apple charging a premium is nothing new, but with most of the iPad’s competition lifting off from the same $500 starting point, the Transformer is a rather unique bargain in the newfangled world of tablets. Well, it is in theory, anyway. Sometimes, you get what you pay for, turning an apparent bargain into something worth less than the sum of its parts.

The thing is, the Transformer has some pretty sweet parts. Some may say that thinking about tablets in terms of specifications is missing the point, and to a certain extent, they’d be correct. Obsessing over entries on a spec sheet is a very PC way of looking at a class of systems that has more in common with smartphones and consumer electronics devices. Some specifications are important, though, if only to establish that the Transformer’s discounted price does not imply sub-par hardware. In many ways, the Eee Pad’s underpinnings are superior to what Apple provides in even the second generation of its iconic tablet.

Under the hood, the Transformer has the very same Nvidia Tegra 2 system-on-chip you’ll find in a slew of Android-powered slates from the likes of Toshiba, Motorola, and Samsung. The SoC has a GeForce-derived GPU and a pair of 1GHz Cortex A9 CPU cores, making it comparable—if not largely equivalent—to the A5 chip tucked inside the iPad. Throw in a gig of RAM and either 16 or 32GB of flash storage, and the Transformer achieves pretty good parity with its more expensive peers.

I wanted to get the silicon out of the way because it’s not nearly as vital as the screen, which is arguably the most important hardware component of the entire system. On a slate, the screen serves as both the primary input device and the display. It’s kind of a big deal, and the Transformer has a pretty good one. The 10.1″ touchscreen is plenty sensitive, and the IPS panel sitting behind all the capacitive mojo is a gorgeous sight to behold.

While cheaper TN panels have become the norm in the notebook world and are even common among desktop systems, far superior IPS displays are taking root in tablets. Splurging on a quality screen only makes sense when it’s so key to the overall experience. Still, I’m impressed Asus found room in the budget for this one, especially because it offers a higher resolution than the almighty iPad. Steve’s overgrown iPod Touch has a 4:3 screen with 1024×768 pixels. The Transformer’s display serves up 1280×800 pixels, which is a whopping 30% more. The extra width means a lot less scrolling when you’ve go the tablet rotated in portrait mode, and the widescreen aspect ratio is perfect for movies. It’s nice having enough pixels to view 720p content without any scaling, too.

I see a lot of folks questioning why anyone would use a tablet over a netbook or a notebook, and I wonder if they’ve ever compared the screens side by side. The difference in overall picture quality really is obvious, and it’s one of the reasons the Transformer has taken over as my primary couch surfing and media consumption device.

My only real complaint about the screen is the fact that its Gorilla Glass exterior has been polished to a glossy shine. Using the touchscreen interface for just a few minutes leaves behind enough smudgy fingerprints to fill an episode of CSI. The reflective coating doesn’t do the Transformer any favors under the sun, either. It is, however, bright enough to overpower reflections and heavy smudging when set to just 50% of full intensity under normal indoor lighting. I wouldn’t recommend using the tablet if you’re fresh from plowing through a bucket of fried chicken, but the smudging surprisingly isn’t an issue when the system is powered on. It’s only when you turn the thing off that the smeared mess becomes unsightly.

Knowing the Transformer was coming in so much cheaper than its rivals, I initially feared there might be glossy plastic involved. Asus adorns the Transformer tastefully, though. A curved plastic piece makes up the underbelly, but its textured finish still looks fresh after heavy handling. The etched pattern provides a little extra grip when cradling the tablet, so it’s functional in addition to imparting an understated artistic touch. There’s even a brushed metal rim to satiate my fetish for such materials. Lest Asus be perceived as aping Apple’s cold and sterile sense of style, the Eee Pad has a warm tinge that’s halfway between copper and mocha. This subtle shade is certainly different, and the Transformer wears it particularly well. Remember, this is a $400 suit we’re talking about.

Since I’ve spent my entire time with the Transformer staring at the screen, the aesthetic appeal of the rest of the thing really doesn’t matter to me. How if feels in my hands does, and the Eee Pad is satisfyingly solid. There’s no flex in the chassis, and the build quality appears to be excellent. This is one of those devices that feels more expensive than it actually is.

Although the Transformer isn’t the skinniest tablet on the market, it’s only 4 mm thicker than the iPad 2 at 10.6″ x 6.7″ x 0.5″. The Eee Pad is 80 grams heavier, too, but the 1.5-lb total weight is hardly cumbersome to carry around or hold with one hand.

Asus has put the extra volume to good use, equipping the Transformer with a few features you won’t find on the world’s most popular tablet. A Mini HDMI output graces the right edge of the casing, as does a MicroSD slot for tiny memory cards. The lack of built-in USB connectivity is a bit of a drag, though. Unless you opt for the keyboard dock, which we’ll get to in a moment, there’s no way to easily attach a digital camera or to plug in a thumb drive.

Before busting out that keyboard, I should probably note that the Transformer ticks all the usual features one might associated with pricier tablets. There are front- and rear-facing cameras, although I can’t see using them for anything other than Skype. Taking pictures with a tablet is unwieldy at best, and the mediocre image quality doesn’t provide much incentive.

Wi-Fi and Bluetooth support predictably round out the Transformer. The only omission of note is cellular broadband support available on pricier versions of competing tablets. Connecting the Eee Pad to the Internet requires a Wi-Fi network, which suits my reclusive lifestyle but is considerably less ideal for commuters with smartphones that don’t support tethering.

Eee Pad: Transform!

Like all tablets, the Transformer has an on-screen keyboard with predictive intelligence. The large screen allows plenty of room for my fat fingers to spread out, but the complete lack of tactile feedback makes the keyboard frustrating to use for anything more than a tweet. Hammering out a few words for a web search is surprisingly quick and easy, though. For real writing, Asus has a very slick keyboard dock.

The keyboard is about the same size as the slate, and the two lock together to form a cohesive clamshell that doesn’t require a separate case to hold everything in place. Although the chiclet array is a little smaller than what I’m used to on my 11.6″ Acer ultraportable, I can still type comfortably at speed. Most of the credit goes to the keys, which have plenty of travel and a slightly chunky tactile response. They’re laid out on a sturdy base that’s almost entirely free of flex, which is more than can be said for the keyboards on a lot of modern notebooks and netbooks.

Unlike some tablet keyboards, this one features an integrated touchpad that’s nice and large. Lifting one’s hand off the keyboard to use the touchscreen isn’t nearly as convenient as sliding a finger down to the touchpad. The pointy end of the mouse cursor is a heckuva lot more precise than my stumpy fingertips, too. You might not need the extra precision when web surfing, but editing text documents is much easier when you can place the cursor exactly where you want it.

Unfortunately, there are problems with both of these auxiliary input methods. Notebook touchpads typically ignore input if it occurs while you’re typing, but the Transformer isn’t that smart. I can’t go more than a couple of sentences without inadvertently brushing my thumb across the touchpad, sending the cursor flying across the page. The narrow right shift key is also problematic, at least for my typing style. About half the time, I end up hitting the up arrow instead.

Recovering from errors and typos is more difficult than it needs to be because the keyboard inexplicably lacks a delete key. The only way to get rid of unwanted characters is with the backspace key, which is especially maddening when one counts all the extra function keys taking up valuable space. How anyone at Asus thought we needed a dedicated screenshot button instead of a delete key is beyond me, and delete isn’t even offered as a secondary function. Backspace would be a less maddening alternative if the keyboard let you jump entire words at a time with the usual “Ctrl + direction” key combination, but that doesn’t fly, either.

At least the button assigned to disabling the touchpad works. Hitting it takes only a second, and my middle finger can reach without the rest of my hand leaving the home row. As you can imagine, I’ve been using that middle finger a lot—to disable the touchpad, of course. The touchpad driver should be smart enough to know when contact is unintentional, though.

With a $150 asking price, the Transformer’s keyboard dock sounds rather expensive for just an input device. Good thing there’s more to it, including a full-sized SD card slot and a couple of honest-to-goodness USB ports. Asus has even gone to the trouble of covering the ports with magnetic doors that snap eagerly into place.

As an added bonus, the keyboard dock houses a 24Wh battery that Asus says can boost the Transformer’s battery life from 9.5 hours to a whopping 16 hours. After using the Transformer for about a month now, I can confirm that Asus’ run-time estimates for the tablet portion are pretty accurate. However, I can’t comment on how much the keyboard adds to the equation because mine isn’t working properly. The internal battery doesn’t seem to be able to hold a charge, and the keyboard will occasionally stop working when connected to the system, even while it’s locked in place.

I’ve seen several reports of keyboard issues online but haven’t yet had the chance to swap mine out for a replacement unit. Asus has also acknowledged an issue with the keyboard that causes it to drain the tablet’s battery slowly when the two are left connected in standby mode. There’s purportedly a way around the problem, which appears to be an artifact of a power management scheme that keeps the keyboard in a low-power state during standby rather than turning it off completely.

Life on Cybertron

So concludes our look at the Transformer’s nuts and bolts. Now, I’m going to tell you how it makes me feel. Tablets are all about the user experience, and a lot of that comes down to the interface, operating system, and associated software. Like just about every other tablet, the Eee Pad is equipped with Google’s Android OS. Units ship with Android 3.0, but an update to Honeycomb, version 3.1, is currently available. There’s a definite improvement in overall responsiveness between the two versions; Honeycomb seems to have eliminated the few instances of UI sluggishness that I encountered with the original Gingerbread install.

This is the first Android device that I’ve spent a lot of time with, and I’m quite impressed with how far the OS has improved over the earlier versions I’ve encountered on smartphones. The OS is quick to navigate, settings are easy to change, and the whole thing is surprisingly intuitive. Even my girlfriend figured it out, and she’s a self-proclaimed technophobe who still uses an old-fashioned cellphone.

Asus lays its own Waveshare UI on top of the OS, and I really dig the five-pane desktop that you can flip through with the flick of a finger. The screen’s generous resolution leaves loads of room for widgets to display system information, detailed battery stats, stock quotes, the weather forecast, or anything else you want to see updated in real time. Changing the size or position of widgets is easy, but be careful not to go overboard. Running too many background applications is a good way to drain the battery on a tablet or smartphone, and it’s easy to get carried away with so much effective desktop real estate.

I bought the Transformer to serve primarily as a couch surfing device, and it’s really excelled at the task. Oddly, at least for a tablet with this kind of resolution, the browser is configured by default to present itself as a mobile device. There’s no reason not to switch the browser into desktop mode, which allows web pages to be enjoyed in all their glory—Flash included. Web pages load slower than on Chrome or Firefox on my notebook, but they scroll smoothly and appear to render properly when in landscape mode. When the tablet is cocked in a portrait orientation, the browser has a tendency to make primary text fields a little narrower than they need to be. All the text is still clearly visible; word-wrap just kicks in a little too early.

Flash video playback can cause netbooks and ultraportable notebooks to stumble, so I wasn’t entirely optimistic about the Transformer’s chances on that front. However, I’ve been pleasantly surprised by Flash 10.3. The only time I’ve encountered choppy playback or dropped frames has been with 720p content that appears on a webpage. When the video is embedded, only the lower-resolution versions play smoothly when the rest of the page is in view. Getting HD clips to play fluidly requires only that you blow the playback window up to full-screen mode, which seems like a reasonable thing to do if you’re opting for the higher resolution. Mealtime is much more epic when stretched across the Transformer’s entire display, anyway. I was particularly impressed to see smooth video playback not only with YouTube content, but also with Vimeo and Viddler videos.

Along with a web browser, the Transformer is loaded with applications, including an email client, calendar app, and even an office suite. The integration with Gmail and Google’s other cloud-based services is excellent, and it’s easy to manage multiple accounts. I didn’t expect to get an office suite separate from Google Docs, but Polaris Office comes loaded on the system and seems to do a pretty good job of handling Word and Excel documents. I can’t imagine braving the office suite without the aid of the keyboard and touchpad, though.

Some of the Transformer’s other bundled applications are more appropriate for life as a pure slate device. The integrated eBook reader handles PDFs with aplomb, and I suspect Asus was able to make a few bucks by loading Amazon’s Kindle app by default. I don’t read a lot of books, to be perfectly honest, but being able to tote around a virtual library with the Transformer will surely come in handy when the mood does strike. It only took a few minutes to load up a stack of free eBooks using the Kindle app, and I suspect most of my future literary purchases will be made using the device.

While I’ve only flipped through a few pages of pure prose on the Transformer, I have been reading quite a lot of comic books with the aid of Perfect Viewer, a free app from the Android Market. The wide-aspect screen works particularly well with comics in portrait mode, and the pages are rendered beautifully on the Transformer’s screen with no need to worry about creasing the spine, tearing a corner, or otherwise disturbing the mint condition of the original hard copy you’re keeping mint in Carbonite.

One might expect those juvenile tendencies to draw me to gaming, but I just don’t see the allure. One factor, I suppose, is the relatively thin selection of Android games compared to what’ll run on an iPad. The biggest issue I have with gaming on the Transformer—and tablets in general—is using the screen as a controller. Games that are well-suited to touchscreen input tend to be a little too casual for my tastes, and all the genres I prefer benefit from precise input. As far as I can tell, game developers aren’t designing their titles with touchpad-equipped keyboard docks in mind.

The Android Market may be a little short on games, but it’s certainly not lacking for options otherwise (although I’m told it does, indeed, have fewer fart apps than the iTunes store). Everything I’ve installed has been easy to find and download, and the experience has me warming up to the idea of app stores in general. I’m not ready to give up downloading executable installers on my PC. However, I’d rather have my mother use an app store than have to walk her through downloading and installing new Windows apps the old-fashioned way.

So far, I’m particularly impressed with Xtralogic’s Remote Desktop software, which I’m tempted to drop $25 on. Being able to tap into my desktop system remotely is hugely convenient, although I’m a little disappointed that the maximum resolution is 1920×1080, which isn’t enough to cover the dual 1920×1200 panels connected to my primary rig. Nevertheless, flicking around a 1080p version of my PC’s desktop while on a 10″ Android slate is pretty sweet. The keyboard dock’s integrated touchpad comes in particularly handy for RDC sessions, too.

Speaking of things that are especially convenient, the Transformer’s built-in File Manager app should make Windows users feel right at home. You won’t have to install any software onto your PC to load the Eee Pad up, either. Plug it in to an empty USB port, and your OS should detect a generic storage device, providing full access to all the files within.

The afterglow

Bum keyboard aside, I’m rather pleased with my Eee Pad Transformer. There are still kinks that need to be ironed out, but the overall experience has been overwhelmingly positive, especially since I was half expecting to feel like I should’ve paid another $100 for one of the big-name tablets. The fact is that the Eee Pad delivers an excellent tablet experience for less money than the competition and the enjoys the extra flexibility of a keyboard dock with a touchpad, additional expansion options, and an extra battery. You’ll have to excuse the obvious pun, but the keyboard dock really is a transformative accessory for the Eee Pad. With a couple of tweaks and some better touchpad drivers, I can see it luring a lot of folks away from netbooks and ultraportables.

Not me. The more I use the Eee Pad, the more clear its place in my computing hierarchy becomes. The Transformer isn’t going to replace my laptop when it’s time to Get Things Done. As much as I prefer the IPS display, the keyboard and touchpad don’t work as well as the ones on my notebook, and I’m simply not as productive with Android and its associated applications as I am in Windows with my usual software suite. That said, I much prefer surfing and reading on the Transformer, which is why it’s claimed a prominent place on the coffee table in my living room.

As at home as the Transformer is in the living room, it also makes a fine travel companion. For business trips, when I need to get real work done efficiently, I can’t afford to leave my laptop behind. I’ll probably bring the Eee Pad’s slate component along for the ride, if only to get a better screen for idle entertainment. On vacation, where I’m generally trying to avoid productivity at all costs, I can see taking both parts of the Transformer and leaving my laptop at home.

I’m going to have to share the Eee Pad with my girlfriend, though. She’s never been all that interested in the various bits of techno whiz-bangery that overflow from my home office, but she’s quite taken with the Eee Pad. So is my mother, who after a five-minute demo, announced that she would like to have one of her very own. To be fair, they likely would have been just as impressed by an iPad. But they were also surprised to learn that the Transformer is 20% cheaper.

If you’ve already got a notebook, you probably don’t need a tablet. I certainly didn’t. That didn’t stop me from wanting one, though, and the Transformer’s more affordable asking price did help me to justify what amounts to an indulgent purchase. I’m glad I pulled the trigger, because the more I use the Eee Pad, the more convinced I become that it’s the ideal device for an awful lot of my casual computing needs. The fact that Picard got so much use out of a similar device in the 24th century tells me that the novelty isn’t going to wear off anytime soon.

Comments closed
    • sweatshopking
    • 8 years ago

    My sister wants one of these, but she’s going back to school in sept… it would be her only mobile computer. Would this thing fail @ being a productive laptop? how is it’s office support? would it be a poor choice? I’m sure google docs runs fine, but i’m not hugely familiar with it. is it a worthwhile product in that dept, or should you stick with windows?

      • ALiLPinkMonster
      • 8 years ago

      The office app it comes with is great IMO. It’s simple yet effective. The keyboard is as easy to type on as a keyboard of its size could be. Most of the problems Geoff pointed out are fairly easily dealt with. My only real complaint is the typing lag in the browser. It has gotten better with the latest 3.2 update, but it still bugs me. I actually got this particular tablet specifically for the keyboard dock so that I can use it at school, and it’s proving quite effective.

    • setbit
    • 8 years ago

    Great article, but you never mention Hulu or Netflix! That’s pretty central functionality for a media consumption device.

    I presume the Hulu site will work because it’s Flash based. Have you tried it?

    I don’t see the Asus listed on the Netflix app’s compatibility list, but did you try it or ask Netflix about what their priorities are for new device support?

    I’d REALLY like one of these, but I need to know more.

    • draksia
    • 8 years ago

    “Although the Transformer isn’t the skinniest tablet on the market, it’s only 4 mm thicker than the iPad 2 at 10.6″ x 6.7″ x 0.5″. The Eee Pad is 80 grams heavier, too, but the 1.5-lb total weight is hardly cumbersome to carry around or hold with one hand.”

    Is it possible to stick to one measurement system?

    Other then that the Eee Pad looks real good.

    • End User
    • 8 years ago

    A Transformer with the option of running Ubuntu would be tempting:

    [url<]http://goo.gl/q8McS[/url<] [url<]http://goo.gl/pD5FS[/url<]

    • markw
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve had my Transformer about a month, too, and I’m still loving it. I don’t know why they didn’t add a dedicated DEL key either, but the SHIFT-BKSPACE combo acts as delete. Also, when typing anything long, to avoid the problem with inadvertently hitting the touchpad, I temporarily turn it off (there’s a handy button in the top row for that). The other thing that you can do, of course, when working on a long document is plug in a USB mouse (which works fine). And not only do thumb drives plug into the dock, but so do USB external hard drives.

    I generally use the dock as the protective ‘case’ when traveling, which roughly doubles the battery life and provides the dedicated keyboard, SD card reader, USB, and mouse support and click off the tablet whenever I just want to surf or read. The IPS screen is beautiful and wonderfully sharp (much sharper than my wife’s 1st-gen iPad). It’s great for viewing photos–the colors on the IPS screen are so much better than any laptop I’ve had. The other thing that surprised me pleasantly is that I find the 1st gen iPad too smooth and slippery to hold comfortably without a case, but the textured back on the transformer provides just enough grip for me to hold it comfortably in one hand while browsing or reading an ebook.

    • ronch
    • 8 years ago

    I’m sure that if Android (or Linux) could have an office suite that’s perfectly compatible with MS Office files, among other things, it could be a better work-centric machine. As it is, my experience with Android (with my Samsung Galaxy Tab) and Ubuntu is that ThinkFree Office and OpenOffice don’t really make it easy to work with coworkers who use another office suite such as MS Office. Documents and presentations don’t display properly (and in some cases, don’t save properly.. which means you’ve wasted hours of work, and waste even more hours of work as you re-do the document on an MS Office-equipped machine) across the different office suites. Documents I create using OOo don’t display correctly with MS Office and vice versa. Same with ThinkFree, which is practically just for viewing since tablets don’t really invite you to type a document with it.

    I believe the Transformer is almost there. If Asus would only read this article well and focus on what needs to be improved, I bet Asus will have another great product in its hands.

    • odizzido
    • 8 years ago

    I actually considered one of these when I was looking around for a new device to use as a portable media device, dictionary, etc. The screen is nice, battery life good, and weight is relatively good. The product I compared it to was the acer aspire one(the c-50 10 inch netbook).

    When I was looking for a new laptop, weight, battery life, and size were my primary concern. The transformer won in all of these categories, but then I realized that I had a concern above all of those things.

    I need to have this device actually be able to do useful things. This is where tablets fail, and fail hard. And it is for this reason I ended up spending less money on the far more capable aspire one.

    • WaltC
    • 8 years ago

    Great article, Geoff. It’s just ever-so-pleasant to actually read such accurate commentary on iPads and Apple, too. I’ll end my praise by simply saying, “Thanks for Thinking Different!” (Isn’t it ironic how all of that has turned around?) It was really pleasant to read about something other than an iPad.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 8 years ago

    It’s an interesting thing. But if you’re already invested in the iTunes app store, these Android tablets must be a lot cheaper to warrant giving up the investment you’ve already made in apps that you’ll have to buy completely over in Android versions. Now if developers were making both versions (android and itunes) available for the price of entry, then people would be willing to leave.

    The longer iTunes app store remains so much better, the more people will face this problem and the fewer who will be willing to take just a $100 savings to leave the Apple walled garden of secure unhappiness and joy.

    I wish Android would hurry up and get a competitive app store, but then… people have to get around the problem I just illustrated to buy Android versions and be willing to buy them. And just say bye bye to everything they already bought from iTunes.

    It’s the chicken and the egg. So developers should make Universal really Universal and make a license for an iPad or iPhone version also a license for the Android version. With a ton of content already purchased, they’d be willing to jump over to Android and then… bam, people’d be investing in new apps for Android, too.

    • obarthelemy
    • 8 years ago

    Thanks for an insightful review.

    Did you travel with the eePad at all ? What did you think of it ?

    After goofing around around with tablets at my local retailer, I came out with the impression that 10 inchers are too big for regular transportation and travel use: won’t fit in my man purse, require 2 hands just to hold them… I accordingly bought an 8″ Ainol Novo8 (one of the few with a good screen, capacitive, 1280×768). I find I use it often enough, so I’ll probably upgrade to a real tablet (with full official Android and a better battery) rather soon.

    I’m already looking around for good smaller ones (they’re not there yet), but I’d like to be sure that 10″ is indeed impractical for true mobile, out-of-home (in transportation, in a café…) use. Have you tried that ?

    • Ardrid
    • 8 years ago

    Excellent article, Geoff. Tablets have interested me from the same point of view you’ve expressed: as dedicated living room media consumption devicse. And, much like you, I have a number of problems with the way Apple conducts itself and the draconian restrictions they continue to keep in place (it’s one of the reasons, aside from the antenna debacle, that led to me giving up my iPhone 4 for a Galaxy S). As such, the Xoom and Transformer are the two devices I’ve been eying as a potential replacement/supplement to my 3 yr old netbook (Eee PC). Your article is definitely convincing me to go with the Transformer.

    That said, I spotted a grave error in your article. You speak of having spent time watching Star Trek: TNG, yet you bludgeoned one of the most crucial details: the Enterprise’s designation. It’s NCC-1701-D 🙂

    • provoko
    • 8 years ago

    Pads are a fad. This transformer is cool, and the fact that it turns into a laptop is very amazing. But the ultimate fact is, these are just toys.

    Expensive toys.

      • SPOOFE
      • 8 years ago

      Point
      .
      .
      .
      .
      .
      .
      Your head

    • ssidbroadcast
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]But I couldn't bring myself to buy an iPad. I'll be honest; I'm not a fan of a lot of things that Apple does, from its business and marketing practices to the walled garden that makes the Steve Jobs Reality Distortion Field all the more difficult to escape.[/quote<] Or maybe you just hate the good for being good. Sorry Geoff, this hipster attitude really rubs me the wrong way.

      • Dissonance
      • 8 years ago

      I thought hipsters liked Apple? All the bearded, skinny jeans-wearing, fixie-riding types I see at coffee shops seem to be rocking Macbooks and iPhones. Apple has managed to deftly remain alternative and cool while coming to define the mainstream.

      But there’s no hate. I think the iPhone 4 is brilliant, and so is the iOS UI. In fact, I still own an iPod. I just don’t agree with all of the restrictions, design decisions, and magical BS attached to a lot of Apple products.

        • ssidbroadcast
        • 8 years ago

        I get a sense you’re cutting off your nose to spite your face on this one. Can’t bring yourself to like the iPad [i<]just[/i<] because it's popular and mainstream--and that's what I'm getting at: the micro-second something becomes mainstream hipsters will scoff and strain. It's [i<]okay[/i<] to like off-beat or left-field products--just the other day I got a Chromebook and I'm writing this post on it now--but it's completely irrational to dislike something just because it came out first, innovated, [i<]invented[/i<] a new market, and executed well. It's only natural that ANY company who can do that consistently would have a market share lead. Shunning that is like staying away from the most attractive girl in the class and seeking out the modestly-hot one that has the odd-shaped mole on her face and thick eyebrows. Irrational.

          • Dissonance
          • 8 years ago

          Where do I dislike the iPad for being first? I dislike the fact that its screen has fewer pixels. I dislike the lack of an HDMI output and memory card slot. I dislike the fact that the optional keyboard doesn’t have a touchpad attached. I dislike losing Flash… almost as much as I dislike Flash itself. And I dislike the fact that Apple asks $100 more.

          Seems irrational to accuse me of disliking the iPad because it’s popular and mainstream when that has nothing to do with the differences I’ve highlighted. Did you get the bit where I said the iPhone is brilliant? That’s about as mainstream as they come, but I’m not scoffing.

          • provoko
          • 8 years ago

          No, hipsters love Apple, in every way possible. It’s one, of the many hypocritical things hipsters do.

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          And yet the most attractive girl in the class isn’t the only one who gets dates, and not just because she’s already booked. Some guys find [i<]other[/i<] girls attractive for completely legitimate, non-hipster-ish reasons; in fact, some would dispute which one is the most attractive girl in the class. Popularity isn't everything, and shallow surfaces aren't everything either. It's ok to value something beyond looks; it's ok to value something beyond popularity; it's ok to have other priorities. It's ok to (omg!) Think Different™(ly)

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        Yeah, I live in the most hipster-centric neighborhood outside Austin / Portland / Williamsburg and in my coffeeshops the business types have Windows laptops; the techie guys (it’s always guys) have Linux laptops. And the shaggy guys who are always arranging band practices or “talking about their art” (when they aren’t actually just working in the coffeeshop)? They’re the ones with the Macbooks.

    • indeego
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]"It's nice having enough pixels to too view 720p content without any scaling, too."[/quote<] Paragraph 8.

      • Dissonance
      • 8 years ago

      Fixed.

    • Corrado
    • 8 years ago

    My problem is the immaturity of Honeycomb at present. I had 2 Honeycomb tablets and ended up returning them due to the quirks and niggles. By the time they’re worked out, there will be much faster hardware out for the same price, and I really am not going to make many compromises on a $500ish device in hopes that it gets fixed sometime down the line. The basis is great. Whats there is nice, it just needs more polishing.

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah, this is how I feel too. The keyboard on the transformer is kind of a deal-breaker for me, but the polish on the OS is a problem as well, from what I’ve seen. (Heck, it’s a problem on the Android phones). If I ever go the tablet route something like the Transformer is the way I’d go, but since there’s no pressing need I’m just going to wait and see.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        transformer with windows 8 would be nice.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 years ago

    So it’s not much of a transformer at $400. That takes another $150, and even then – is it more than meets the eye? Disappointing to read so many problems for that pricey add-on, too.

    The tablet itself seems pretty cool. A toy, but a really cool toy. I’ve never felt the need to be on the couch watching TV and surfing the internet at the same time; I can’t focus on both at once. Still, if you’re that ADHD, I guess this is cheaper than taking your meds.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      I don’t have adhd, but i do find watching tv boring. I can focus on tasks, and will watch tv, but it’s just not that amazing. IDK, i just seemed to grow out of it. i’m not saying it’s juvenile, i just enjoyed it less the older i got. same thing with the internet.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        No, what i mean is, if I try to do two things at once, I rarely do either of them well. Trying to do both at once is an impossibility, at which point I say “fuck it” and go play Starcraft.

          • Imperor
          • 8 years ago

          I DO have ADHD and I more or less HAVE to do two or more things at a time not to get distracted by whatever comes by. Trying to watch TV without my hand on a laptop results in me talking all through the program, if with friends, or to start rummaging about to find something to distract me.
          2655 played games of Hearts in just over a year on my laptop says quite a lot…
          Haven’t owned an actual TV for close on a decade now though, I choose my programming! 😉
          Meds don’t do it for me, frying your brain with Amphetamines is rubbish and makes you dim and dull, that’s no way to live your life!

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            HEARTS? HOW CAN YOU FOCUS ON THAT FOR ANY TIME AT ALL. IT’S THE BORINGIST THING IN THE WORLD. KILL ME BEFORE I PLAY HEARTS.

    • burntham77
    • 8 years ago

    Comic books and magazines were the main reason I chose a tablet over a black and white eReader. Also, having a solid bit of hardware and a lot of flexibility is why I picked a Xoom over a Nook Color.

    Perfect Viewer is a nice app for comics, but I had issues with some CDR files crashing the software. I experimented with a few viewer apps until I came across jjComic Viewer. So far, that app has yet to crash once and I have read hundreds of comics (mostly Spawn, which is a great series for the most part).

    Recently my wife and I moved into a new apartment across town. I really appreciated having a tablet during that move because I could throw on either Pandora (when the wireless network was back up) or just hit shuffle on the music on the tablet (mostly classical) which made the whole move much more pleasant.

    Also, not having to lug around a bunch of books was a huge bonus.

    • BobbinThreadbare
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]Asus lays its own Waveshare UI on top of the OS, and I really dig the five-pane desktop that you can flip through with the flick of a finger.[/quote<] You make this sound like a feature unique to Asus when I'm pretty sure every Android device has a flippable desktop. Also, you say the main reason you prefer this to a notebook or netbook is the superior screen. Is there any technical reason why they couldn't put a nice screen in a book form? It seems like kind of an arbitrary market segmentation and one which will probably soon be rectified (as pads go towards cheaper screens themselves).

      • Dissonance
      • 8 years ago

      I guess it depends on what you deem a flippable desktop. I’ve got multiple pages of icons on my Palm Pre, and I can flip through them with the same sideways swipe as flicking through desktops on the Transformer, but it’s not really the same thing.

      As for IPS screens in notebooks, it’s already been done by Lenovo’s ThinkPad X220. The premium isn’t all that exorbitant, either, but there isn’t much in the way of alternatives at the moment. I can only hope that the popularity of tablets will encourage more notebook makers to at least offer an IPS upgrade option on some of their systems. Fingers crossed.

        • BobbinThreadbare
        • 8 years ago

        Thanks for the response.

        I’m still not altogether clear what you mean by the flippable desktop and how it’s different from say my Droid 2. Guess I have to go hunt down a video.

      • UberGerbil
      • 8 years ago

      The reason you’re seeing IPS panels in tablets and not in {net}note)books is because tablets are readily, and frequently, flipped into portrait mode. Modern TN displays are generally not too bad when viewed off one axis, but exhibit horrible color shifts and generally awful results when viewed off the other. This is not a problem with conventional displays that stay in one orientation, but it’s a nightmare for something that may be viewed from a wide range of angles.

      For the same reason, the only desktop displays that offer rotation to the portrait orientation are generally [i<]not[/i<] TN displays. I'm sure somebody will try to do a cut-rate tablet with a TN display, but the results are likely to be poor. (Which may not get in the way of its success -- Walmart has made a good business by cutting quality if necessary to get low prices -- but it won't help). Hopefully things will push in the other direction, and the success of IPS displays in tablets will pull their prices down and make them more common again in 'books.

    • Coulda
    • 8 years ago

    I wondered when TR would start covering tablets. Like it or not, that’s where all the attention is and it’d mean more viewership for TR. How about covering Smart phones? I’m not personally interested in owning these devices but the competition in this mobile segment is fascinating. All the giants fighting in CPU SoC and OS front to take market share of what many perceive to be the future of computing.

      • trackerben
      • 8 years ago

      Yea, TR has been too conservative. Since getting my ipad on launch day I’ve had to figure out for myself what everyone knows by now, and tried to share its pluses and minuses with anyone interested. Still, it’s good to hear Geoff’s competent reconfirmation of what many have discovered to be among its best uses.

      It’s sad that he encounters several bugs, sparse apps, and rough edges but not unexpected. That happens when one foregoes the more polished experience inherent in a more evolved mobile ecosystem. But a techie would be comfortable with all that admin and troubleshooting jazz, the care and feeding of yet another untamed device in the stable. For what is life without the all day-to-day challenges of greening the front lawn, but the orderliness of a walled garden tended by a protective gardener?

    • UberGerbil
    • 8 years ago

    [quote<]Obsessing over entries on a spec sheet is a very PC way of looking at a class of systems that has more in common with smartphones and consumer electronics devices.[/quote<]You say that like nobody ever obsesses over entries on a spec sheet for smartphones or consumer electronic devices. And you're right, all smartphones are pretty much identical and I've never seen anybody care what components go into their AV stack.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      Exactly. When shopping for any piece of electronics, digging up the specs is the first thing I do.

        • Imperor
        • 8 years ago

        Sooo… You’re both PC? 😛

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          YAH. aka not dumb.

    • jjj
    • 8 years ago

    Any reason you like Xtralogic Remote Desktop over LogMeIn or RealVNC’s VNC Viewer?

      • Dissonance
      • 8 years ago

      In my experience, VNC isn’t nearly as smooth as RDC, especially over a slow or flaky connection. Haven’t used LogMeIn, but since I use RDC all the time on my notebook, I figured I’d stick with what’s been working well for years. Xtralogic might put its name on the app, but it’s just interfacing with Windows’ built-in remote desktop capability.

      • Flatland_Spider
      • 8 years ago

      With LogMeIn you don’t get any extra features over regular RDP if you’re on the same network. There is some extra security with LogMeIn if you’re accessing PCs over the Internet, but aside from that, just forward an obscure on your router.

        • Corrado
        • 8 years ago

        The central administration of LogMeIn is great though. I have dads, my moms, my 4 home machines, my wife’s machine, and a few …. troublesome family friends’ computers in there so I can remote in where ever and help them out.

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          That’s true if you’re administering a lot of different machines, especially if you pay for the full version of LogMeIn. But if you’re just remoting into one, the differences between the free versions of TeamViewer, LogMeIn, and the various RD / VNC things don’t matter too much. RD does tend to be the most responsive for Windows, though I don’t know about using it from any kind of iOS/Android tablet.

    • ibnarabi
    • 8 years ago

    I’ve had mine for a few weeks, It’s a great little device for the simple things. The dock actually works the way it’s supposed to as well. 🙂

    My girlfriend is in love with it, all the girls seem to love tablets, far cuddlier than a laptop?

      • dpaus
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah we picked up an [i<]hp[/i<] TouchPad for testing, and I have to pry it out of my girlfriend's hands every morning to take it back in to work.

        • ibnarabi
        • 8 years ago

        I’m thinking I should launch my own tablet, colored pink, with kittens and puppies all over 😉

          • UberGerbil
          • 8 years ago

          I was going to suggest the One Tree Hill (is that show still on?) or Twilight characters (a Twi-let?), but you have to pay to license those. Unicorns and puppies are cheaper.

          Or how about the Hello Kitty Tablet?

          Oh, to heck with it: just give it a clear protective case with a “collage” insert so they can plaster their own stickers and pictures all over it.

    • spuppy
    • 8 years ago

    I have a 1st Gen iPad, acquired in an exchange for some work, and it is the slowest piece of crap hardware device I’ve ever used. Perhaps because I have always used mid-to-high end WinMo and Android phones in the last 3 years, but with a slow processor and 256MB of RAM, starting apps and switching apps (not multitasking, iOS doesn’t really have proper multitasking) is dreadfully slow. And most games (besides the disposable 2D puzzle games) play horribly. Some are at the point where they are completely unplayable (Telltale’s newer 3D games, for instance).

    This is a PERFECT example of the Apple Reality Distortion Field in effect. There is NO WAY this kind of performance should be acceptable. Yet, even with what, 20 million sold, hardly anyone raises the issue. The only time it became noticed was when the superior iPad 2 came out. And then it was just time to buy the next one for these people…

    After reading this, I’m tempted to trade my ipad 1 to some sucker, and pick up this instead. I have to admit, the only time I actually use it is for watching SDTV while traveling, and reading books. It fails at most other media.

      • Corrado
      • 8 years ago

      When you’re the only game in town (as the iPad was for almost a year), then the performance is what it is. Its the fastest out, and it becomes the norm. Only when compared to something faster do you realize that what you had before was slow.

      • trackerben
      • 8 years ago

      Aha, I remember feeling that way about my dad’s original Apple II+, when I tried running Aztec on it. Leaping lizards – in green slow motion. Compared to my Color Computer and fake Atari, it was a deadful gaming experience for anything other than phased strategy titles. When IBM’s 5150 launched with CGA I jumped 8 bits and never looked back. And when EGA clone cards came out for the AT, it was time to jump buses.

      Just because something is first at something is no excuse for it to satisfy us less than something that comes later! The bitterness that ought to BOIL in me at the unfairness of it all…

        • UberGerbil
        • 8 years ago

        The Apple ][+ was fine for things like LodeRunner and Choplifter (well, until you got too many things going on at once). It was a fine gaming experience for those early games, and I say that as someone who also owned a 2600. Later on, it’s true, they just tried to push that 1MHz CPU and 48K of memory a little too far.

          • trackerben
          • 8 years ago

          Choplifter was great, but it showed its limits even with ramcard upgrades. And I still had to pester my dad to buy a good joystick or thumbstick. I later gravitated to wargames like Russia because character-based graphics ran acceptably with just keyboard input.

          The first real break from UI entrapment was the arrival of cheap pointing mice and color displays. Then it took the near-simultaneous advents of DOS 3.x on 386s, soundblaster, SVGA, and Wing Commander to show the way in the early 1990s, before the big disruption caused by the rise of multitasking graphical UIs like Win9x. Since then, most developments in hardware outside of GPUs have been more evolved iterations of what came before. Vastly faster and of much finer quality, but still extrapolatable and predictable.

          The personal touch phone/tablet is the latest great disruption in the way we literally handle mobile computing. Like the DOS gaming PC, the iPad didn’t happen overnight. It was the evolutionary culmination of years of innovations, refinements, and conceptual rejiggering until suddenly things just fell into place for a groundbreaking new experience.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 years ago

      I know for sure that the 2nd gen iPad is very responsive and quick. I had to use one – actually use one – for about 10 days earlier this month and it was pretty spiffy.

      The first gen might be slow due to the amount of memory, but as Corrado said, it was the only game in town. And at release, iOS 3 was plenty fast, and iOS 4 uses more RAM. that made the iPad slower, and there’s no official way to downgrade.

    • glynor
    • 8 years ago

    I’m sorry, Geoff. I think the Transformer is a great HoneyComb tablet, and I can see where you’re coming from on Apple (even if I don’t [i<]entirely[/i<] agree). But this: [quote<]The SoC has a GeForce-derived GPU and a pair of 1GHz Cortex A9 CPU cores, making it comparable—if not largely equivalent—to the A5 chip tucked inside the iPad.[/quote<] They sure [url=http://www.anandtech.com/show/4216/apple-ipad-2-gpu-performance-explored-powervr-sgx543mp2-benchmarked<]don't seem to be[/url<] "largely equivalent" to me. Ask yourself this: Would you feel comfortable making that kind of broad sweeping generalization when reviewing a CPU with integrated graphics in a desktop? How about Llano and Sandy Bridge? And, while the GPU battle between the two chips looks something like Llano and Sandy Bridge, the [url=http://www.anandtech.com/show/4225/the-ipad-2-review/4<]A5 is also no "Llano"[/url<] to Nvidia's "Sandy Bridge" in the general CPU department either. Heck, the [url=http://blogs.barrons.com/techtraderdaily/2011/04/01/apple-nvidia-a5-chip-has-reason-to-be-big-says-rbs/<]A5 is a substantially larger and more expensive chip[/url<] than the Tegra 2. If you are writing a piece on your general impressions of a product that you own and generally like (despite admittedly without thoroughly testing or "living with" with that product's obvious and dramatically better selling rival), I can get with that. And if CPU and GPU performance just aren't important to you for your device, or comparative performance isn't important, then say that. Even if you figure it is impossible to really "test around" the massive differences the software platform makes in the performance of these devices and that it is the comparative experience that counts, I could understand that. But to throw out a quip and generalize "they're basically the same, right?" with no evidence to back it up (and only a trip to Google away from considerable evidence to the contrary) smacks of uninformed laziness with the color of fanboyism. It sure doesn't feel like the kind of informed and meticulous analysis I come to TR to get. If you did something like this comparing an AMD and Nvidia GPU, I'd expect people to call you on it. You should expect that with this as well.

      • Coulda
      • 8 years ago

      I see your point. ARM SoC is very interesting area, and other sites do post benchmarks for these. But I wouldn’t be too harsh about it as this was first TR article about a tablet. It was written more like a user experience than a review and I’d think that TR would soon catch up and go more in-depth if they starts to do more of these Tablet reviews.

      • dragosmp
      • 8 years ago

      I partially disagree as it seems to be a general consensus that on a tablet or smartphone the hardware is less important than the software. iPad2’s GPU is (much) faster as seen in most benches, but does this reflect in day to day use? For tablet gamers maybe, but for others no. Much like on the PC: Llano’s GPU is important only if the user plays games, if they don’t game they won’t care about any of Intel’s lowly IGP.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        For the most competitive part of the tablet software market – what everyone focuses on, yes. After answering the question “can it surf the web?” the next question in most reviews (though Geoff claims not to care) is “how fast are the games? How pretty are they?”

      • Dissonance
      • 8 years ago

      Would you agree that they’re comparable SoCs? I mean, just look at that second link you’ve posted. In the SoC comparison chart, the Tegra 2 and A5 share an awful lot of identical traits. Dual Cortex A9 cores, the same clock-speed ranges, identical cache sizes. The A5 may have a more powerful GPU, but I’ve not seen anything running on an iPad or iPhone that has substantially better graphics than what’s been demoed on Tegra 2. See Citadel.

      In the context of a tablet SoC, which does much more than paint pixels, the A5 and Tegra 2 seem pretty comparable to me. Indeed, if we go by the definition of equivalent provided by a trip to Google, we find that it implies “equal in value, amount, function, etc.” From a functionality perspective, and within the confines of a tablet, I think we’ve got pretty good case for equivalence here. Largely, anyway.

      But I’m glad you can get with an article that conveys impressions from living with a device, because that’s exactly what this is. I thought the presentation was pretty clear, starting with the title and extending all the way to a conclusion-less afterglow. There are no graphs, there’s no performance testing, and liberal use of “I” suggests that an opinion is being conveyed. I even talk about my feelings.

      Rest assured that our regularly scheduled programming is unaffected by occasional trips down editorial lane.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 years ago

        If you want to talk about your feelings, see a therapist!

        (ok really before I get thumbed down to -40, that was meant to be a joke, but since I have to explain myself, there you go)

          • NeelyCam
          • 8 years ago

          Weak. You won’t even get -10

        • glynor
        • 8 years ago

        I [i<]do[/i<] agree that they are largely comparable SoCs, and I totally got where the article was coming from. That was essentially my point. It was a good article, and I agreed with most of the basic points you made about the Transformer (which I've unfortunately, not had the chance to play around with personally yet). I also really appreciated that you took the time to spend a full month with it before reporting back your impressions, unlike so many of the other "reviews" of the product that are obviously rushed out to hit a NDA (where the author obviously had only 4-6 days with the product before publishing). When I saw the "review" go up, I was excited to read it. I'm strongly considering purchasing a Transformer as [i<]my[/i<] first personal Android device. So, the presentation was clear, and I "got it". But, TR no longer has as strong of a delineation between "blog-like" editorial content, and full-on reviews. The article was highlighted in the main "top story" area of the site, and until clicking on it and reading it through, there was no contextual way to "tell" that it was this type of review as opposed to a "hard review" like you'd do with a GPU or CPU or even Cases. But, on the other hand, the two chips [i<]are not[/i<] equivalent. Like you point out, in the AnandTech general review of the A5, the "spec list" for the chips is almost identical. But, like with CPUs, little differences in spec support can make a big performance difference (the Tegra 2 doesn't support NEON, for example). And the embedded GPUs are worlds apart. It is very difficult if not impossible for you to properly evaluate these differences without thoroughly testing the competition. I have an iPad 2 (it isn't mine personally, it is "works" but I'm the primary user) and I've had lots of opportunities to test a Xoom. The gaming and GPU experience on the two is [i<]nothing[/i<] alike. They are similar, but the iPad 2 clearly has much more power. You even provided a perfect example in your response: Epic's engine (you mentioned Citadel). This is a perfect example because the iPad 2 running Infinity Blade looks [i<]dramatically[/i<] better than the iPad 1, [i<]because the GPU is more powerful[/i<]. Same goes with Real Racing HD and many other games that have been optimized for the A5. While on the other hand, [url=http://www.destructoid.com/epic-no-infinity-blade-for-android-198230.phtml<]Infinity Blade isn't coming to Android[/url<], and the tech demos they've shown of Citadel on phones look just like the "old version" for the iPad 1 and 3GS. And even if you ignore that there are simply way more high-quality titles available for the iOS ecosystem, the overall UI experience on the iPad 2 is still superior to what the Xoom, at least, provides. (For example, I'd call touch responsiveness on the Xoom "usually acceptable" but I'd call it "invisible" on the iPad.) So, I absolutely appreciate the editorial content. I would even go so far as to say that I come here for the editorial content. But I expect those conclusions to be backed by reality, or to at least for the reader to be given context and not misled when the author's experience is lacking in a particular area. Most importantly, I just thought the false equivalency stood out and, like I said, had the "color" of fanboyism. In the end, it "feels" like this: When Apple was still stuck on the G4 CPU in their laptops (because the G5 needed a nuclear plant and cooling tower to run) but Apple fanboys would point to the 2.0 GHz G4 in a PowerBook and compare it to a 2.0GHz Intel chip in a Dell and say, "well, that's basically the same, right?" and then move on. Don't be that guy.

      • KoolAidMan
      • 8 years ago

      Yeah, that was a giant WTF. The A5 is magnitudes faster than the Tegra 2 in graphics performance. It isn’t even close, and it has been pretty well known for a while. The article is full of inaccuracies and as you say “uninformed laziness with the color of fanboyism” but that was the one that jumped out the most since it is well out of subjective analysis.

      • Arag0n
      • 8 years ago

      Nah, you are talking to a hardcore computer site….. Tablets and smartphones are hold by categories, similar performance levels, but if a CPU it’s a 20% slower it’s a damned failure!

      • obarthelemy
      • 8 years ago

      Graphics performance only impacts game. Outside of games, the article you linked is irrelevant, and both tablets CPUs are actually very close.

    • Arag0n
    • 8 years ago

    I still see the needs of anyone in this order:

    Buy a laptop and/or desktop, whatever fits more your needs or both if you need speed in home, but still require your laptop for some out-of-home tasks.

    Then, buy a smartphone for your computing needs in the go.

    Then, if you still have cash and you travel or needs to go somewhere every while, buy a tablet to avoid you carrying the laptop in trains and airports.

    That’s why I still wait for Windows8, I believe it will disrupt this order and fusion the first and third. A tablet that it’s laptop or a laptop that it’s tablet. I just hope they deliver some 12″ laptops/tablets with enough performance for my taste with >8h battery life.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 years ago

      I think this product will likely be the future design. Windows 8 will be a pretty big market disruptor i think. I’m looking forward to it. I happen to [i<] like [/i<] windows, and a lot of MS's products. everything works with them, and I find them to be quite pretty. windows 8 looks to continue that for me, and I do think the metro UI looks better than a grid layout.

    • Krogoth
    • 8 years ago

    Soundwave superior, Constructicons inferior!

    [url<]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsLcTtCrqwg[/url<]

      • burntham77
      • 8 years ago

      Best animated movie ever.

      That’s right. Ever.

        • sweatshopking
        • 8 years ago

        maybe. but it’s an animated movie. that’s like saying “best turd ever”

          • eitje
          • 8 years ago

          You hold that title already! hur hur.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 years ago

            yes. at least im’ best something. you’re a mediocre turd. sucks, i know.

        • NeelyCam
        • 8 years ago

        It doesn’t have Megan Fox.

        Yes – she’s dumb, but I don’t care.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 years ago

          lol

      • Krogoth
      • 8 years ago

      I guess somebody doesn’t like G1 Transformers or Decepticons.

      Haters are going to hate…….

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