A first look at Cherry’s MX green key switches

Cooler Master is known far and wide for its cases, power supplies, and cooling products. Over the past several years, however, the company has branched out into gaming peripherals. Its CM Storm lineup is now quite extensive, with mice, headsets, mouse pads gaming surfaces, and keyboards.

One of those keyboards, the CM Storm Trigger, has piqued our interest. This unusual specimen is one of the very few keyboards on the market with Cherry’s MX green key switches. We’ve sampled most of the other MX switch variants before—blacks, blues, browns, and reds—but the greens are something of a novelty. They’re tougher, springier than their siblings, and they don’t sacrifice the all-important click and tactile bump. Our understanding is that the greens are normally found under the space bars of Cherry MX blue keyboards. In both feel and specifications, though, the greens are closer to the buckling spring switches of IBM’s iconic Model M keyboards. That makes them uniquely appealing to old-school geeks.

Clearly, we couldn’t resist taking the MX greens out for a test drive. So, we scored a CM Storm Trigger from Cooler Master, set it up in our labs, cracked our knuckles, and compared it to the old Model M and a Rosewill keyboard based on the softer Cherry MX blue switches. After some lengthy and intensive typing sessions, we’re ready to share our findings.

Before discussing the Cherry MX greens in much more detail, we should give the CM Storm Trigger a brief introduction. This keyboard is quite a full-featured offering, with a detachable palm rest, a set of five macro keys (plus media keys overlaid with the F keys), onboard firmware, and dedicated software that allows both key reassignment and macro programming. Other notable features include adjustable LED backlighting, a 1,000-Hz response rate, 6-key rollover, 64KB of onboard memory for macro storage, and a two-port USB hub with a 5V DC jack that can supply extra juice to power-hungry devices.

No question about it, the Trigger is a premium keyboard—and it feels like, it, too. This thing weighs a hefty 3.3 lbs (2.9 lbs if you remove the palm rest), and it has a thin, velvety rubber coating on some of its surfaces, including the entirety of the palm rest and the sides of the chassis.

Right now, the variant of the CM Trigger with Cherry MX green switches is available exclusively from Cooler Master’s online store for $119.99. That’s pricier than other versions of the Trigger, which are based on Cherry MX black, blue, brown, and red switches and can be purchased at Amazon for anywhere from $85 to $118, depending on the model.

Cooler Master tells us the existing Trigger model with green switches is in short supply and will be “phased out” soon. In its stead, Cooler Master plans to introduce a new Trigger model with black key caps and green backlighting. (The current offering has red LEDs built into each key switch.) The company also expects to offer Cherry MX green switches in additional keyboard models beside the Trigger. Those will include the QuickFire Stealth, which will have blank key caps; the QuickFire TK, which will cut out the arrow keys and paging block to save space; and the QuickFire XT, which will be a more conventional, full-sized offering. We saw some of those designs at the Consumer Electronics Show earlier this year.

Cherry MX

switch type

Feedback Clicky Actuation

force

Bottom-out

force

Red Linear No 45 g 60 g
Brown Tactile No 45 g 60 g
Blue Tactile Yes 50 g 65 g
Black Linear No 60 g 80 g
Green Tactile Yes 80 g 105 g

Here’s what the Cherry MX green looks like and how it compares to its siblings. (For a more thorough examination of the Cherry MX black, blue, brown, and red switch types, including actuation graphs and noise recordings, check here.) The MX greens have a lot in common with the blues: both switch types have a “bump” in the response curve that indicates a successful actuation, and both switch types produce an audible click when actuated. That said, the greens’ 80 g actuation force is much higher than the blues’ 50 g. It’s actually equivalent to the bottom-out force of the Cherry MX black switches, which are the springiest variety normally found on gaming keyboards. The greens’ 105 g bottom-out force, meanwhile, is far above that of other offerings, even the old IBM Model M.

For reference, the actuation graph in IBM’s buckling spring patent suggests the Model M requires around 70 g of force for actuation and 80 g to bottom out. We put that to the test with a gray-label Model M (part number 1391401), piling pennies on a key until the spring buckled and the switch was actuated. It took about 75 g worth of coins to reach that point.

In short, the Cherry MX greens put up a lot of resistance. Probably more than you’re used to.

That can be good and bad. I haven’t been all that impressed with Cherry MX blue-based keyboards in the past, because I find them too mushy. Hitting the actuation point is very easy, and it doesn’t correspond exactly with the click, which contributes to a feeling of imprecision. The greens feel closer to the Model M’s buckling springs—more solid, with a more distinct sense of having successfully depressed each switch. That said, the first few sentences I typed on the Trigger had a number of letters missing, because my fingers weren’t pushing down hard enough. That might be less of an issue if you hunt and peck, but touch typists will face a bit of a learning curve.

Compounding the problem, the Trigger’s double- and triple-width keys—namely left and right shift, backspace, and enter—feel even harder than the alphanumeric keys. When I asked Cooler Master about it, I was told the extra-wide keys simply use a “different stabilizer switch than a traditional key.” The company agrees that the extra springiness is noticeable, but it claims that “hasn’t been something we’ve seen as a common complaint from the mech keyboard enthusiast community.” Well, as a mechanical keyboard enthusiast, I beg to differ. Missing some keystrokes because of inconsistent weighting can be irksome, especially in games. My pinky fingers certainly didn’t appreciate the extra workout.


For your listening pleasure, here are audio recordings of the Trigger, Model M, and Rosewill RK-9000 (with MX blue switches) in action. Click the buttons to switch between them.

Subjectively, the Trigger’s green switches sound like the most discreet of the bunch. The Rosewill’s MX blues produce a shrill rattle that’s difficult to get used to, and the Model M’s buckling springs generate a loud clatter with a trailing metallic hum, sort of like hail stones hitting a tin roof. The Trigger, by comparison, seems to muffle the clicks somewhat. Audible feedback is delivered, but without too much zeal. Maybe that’s because of the Cooler Master keyboard’s sturdy build. The key caps feel more firmly seated than on the Rosewill, and the frame doesn’t appear to resonate or to amplify keystroke noise at all.

Conclusions

Not everybody will be a fan of the Cherry MX greens. In fact, I’d wager they’re a little too hard for the majority of typists—at least folks who’ve been spoiled by mushy chiclets and more gentle mechanical switches, like the MX browns. IBM’s Model M was my daily driver for a number of years, and I enjoy going back to it on occasion, yet switching to the Trigger was a harrowing experience initially.

I think the learning curve would have been easier if the Trigger’s shift, backspace, and enter keys felt consistent with their alphanumeric siblings. They don’t, though. They’re noticeably harder, which I found needlessly frustrating.

Those little niggles aside, the greens are the closest Cherry has come to replicating the feel of the IBM buckling springs. That counts for something, especially if you’re someone hoping to find a modern, full-featured, and aesthetically pleasing keyboard that emulates the feel of the plain beige classic. Because, let’s be honest: the Model M is not a pretty keyboard, and its Unicomp successors also won’t be winning any beauty pageants. None of those keyboards have the same array of gamer-friendly features, like macro keys, as Cooler Master’s offering, either. Mixing those state-of-the-art features with an old-school key response can be nice.

Just keep in mind that the Cherry MX greens will almost certainly give your fingers a workout.

Comments closed
    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 7 years ago

    re-reading this review I didn’t get a sense of the actual conclusion. Is this a solid keyboard or are the space key and other such elongated keys too stiff for it to be functional??? Are the keys actually enjoyable??? The comparative review is overly mushy and leaves me unsure of how they really received the keyboard vs how they received the keys.

      • superjawes
      • 7 years ago

      Basically, the conclusion is: this is the best alternative to the Model M without using a buckling spring design, it looks better, and it has a full set of features.

      I think the Cherry switches have basically been accepted as the standard for mechanical switches these days, so the reviews are focusing on how they feel rather than a straight up or down recommendation. And that makes sense because mechanical switches are about feel, and Cherry has 4 (and now maybe 5) mainstream variations to fit your preference.

    • Mr. Eco
    • 7 years ago

    This thread is filled with keyboard nerds. No way I pay more than 40 euro, and that’s for keyboard + mouse.

      • Sqinky
      • 6 years ago

      Of course it is. It’s a thread about a niche product with rabid followers. I have 1 unicomp keyboard which I love, but it’s too big so I started buying other keyboards. My next one was a CM Rapid with blues. Love the board, but decided I missed a ten-key pad and wanted backlighting. Now I have a CM TK with blues. The blue keys are not bad, but I really prefer the buckling spring keys. I will buy a CM TK with green keys as soon as CM makes it available in the US. I gave my Rapid to my 17 year old nephew who has been drooling over my keyboards for a few years now. I may have created another “keyboard nerd”. What it boils down to is that some people are OK using tools they purchase at wal-mart and some folks require tools from Snap-On. It’s all personal choice much like a golfer choosing a putter. Some just feel better and are more enjoyable to use.

    • DrDillyBar
    • 7 years ago

    I’ll take two.

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 7 years ago

    I’m convinced that the Cherry MX Brown switches are the best currently-available keyboard technology.

    Most of my typing is still done on a CVT Avant Prime (Creative Vision Technologies bought out [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Northgate_Computers<]Northgate's Omnikey[/url<]). It uses ALPS switches.

    • relmerator
    • 7 years ago

    Wy not just go with the original? Unicomp owns the buckling spring patent and has been making excellent keyboards with the actual model M switches for years. The only change I’d make is to add media/vol/sleep…maybe someday….

    [url<]http://pckeyboard.com/page/UKBD/UB40P4A[/url<]

      • Sqinky
      • 6 years ago

      The word on the street is that Unicomp has ALL the old IBM tooling. So if they wanted to produce an “IBM Mini” ten keyless buckling springs key board, they could. And I for one, would buy it in a blink of an eye. I’d miss the ten-key pad but I’d get over it probably. It would be worth the gamble for me.

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 7 years ago

    I find the Razor mechanical keyboard to be quite enjoyable and wonder how this and other boards compare to that. I have the black widow ultimate.

    My roommate hates my keyboard and can’t type on it. His favorite keyboard of all time is the old splits ergo from Microsoft. Its like 10 years old and he thinks its the best thing ever, so apparently quality is indeed subjective, lol.

    I’d be interested to see if corsair makes a more springy/clicky iteration of that beautiful keyboard they put out last year.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 7 years ago

    Based on the sound, the Greens sounded a lot more like the Browns I have than the Blues I tried. That said, it’s hard to tell because of the fact I can adjust the volume up and down on my media player.

    Am I right to assume the actual sound volume is louder on the Green’s than the Brown’s even though the sound profile sounds similar?

    EDIT:

    Where’s the Topre keyboard comparison review? 😉 You can only have so many Cherry MX reviews before you start branching out to other alternative options?

    • gamoniac
    • 7 years ago

    And I am still waiting for a keyboard/mouse combo that can connect to multiple (say, six) Bluetooth transceivers, with which I can replace my KVM… The scenario: most monitors come with several input ports to hook up to multiple PCs. I need a Bluetooth keyboard that I can switch between these PCs with some key stroke combo. So, one keyboard/mouse combo and multiple PCs, each with a transceiver.

    I want to do away with a KVM (which I current use) for several reasons:
    1. I want the ability to independently switch between video inputs regardless of the keyboard input.
    2. Most KVM (like mine) only has VGA I/O
    3. I want to have less wiring

    The only issue I can see is the inclusion (or exclusion) of audio with this approach, but I am sure that can be overcome if we think hard enough.

      • just brew it!
      • 7 years ago

      My IOGear KVM (GCS1104) is a DVI switch, and supports switching of USB and audio ports independent of the main KVM ports. Sounds like maybe this does most of what you want?

        • gamoniac
        • 7 years ago

        That is a very nice KVM (mine current one is also an IOGear, though VGA), although I just realize I left out an important reason from my list — I have dual monitors. However, I might still get this KVM because it will solve part of the VGA issue I am facing. Thank you for the suggestion!!!

        Edit:
        I also saw the sweet dual-DVI KVM GCS1644 for ONLY $467 on amazon. [url<]http://www.amazon.com/IOGEAR-4-Port-Dual-Link-Switch-GCS1644/dp/B0029U15GC/ref=sr_1_9?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1362726235&sr=1-9&keywords=iogear+kvm+dvi[/url<] It would still be nice to have the less expensive option of a single keyboard/mouse combo that supports multiple Bluetooth transceivers.

      • tanker27
      • 7 years ago

      I used to use KVMs in the past but not anymore. I RDP to all my PCs/Laptops now. With a multi-monitor setup I can easily switch between them, even sound.

      Maybe I’m missing something. :/

        • gamoniac
        • 7 years ago

        No, you are right. I RDP into my machines and VMs most of the time, but out of the four machines, one is for work (on VPN) and one is on a different sub domain/router, both are not reachable by my main workstation for security reason.

        Besides, once in a blue moon, a direct connection (KVM) is still good for getting into the BIOS, etc.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 7 years ago

      There are software solutions to your issues. I used some back at school that you essentially drag your mouse from screen to screen to change systems and the keyboard inputs to whatever system your mouse is on. Can use different OS’s and everything. Don’t remember what the solution was called though.

        • Anonymous Hamster
        • 7 years ago

        One is called Mouse Without Borders.

      • Anonymous Hamster
      • 7 years ago

      One solution I used for audio is to run all the PCs through a mixer. This is often what you really want, anyway.

      As far as keyboard & mouse, why not just use a single transceiver with a USB switch (that’s part of a KVM)?

        • gamoniac
        • 7 years ago

        As a matter of fact, I just pulled out my Logitech Bluetooth keyboard/mouse combo from the storage just to see it would work this time. My IOGEAR GCS634U KVM has keyboard and mouse USB ports. No luck. I could get it to work when the transceiver is plugged into the USB mouse port of the KVM, but the KVM does not recognize the scroll lock-scroll lock key strokes via Bluetooth transceiver. I even plugged the transceiver directly into the PC prior just to ensure that the drivers are installed correctly.

          • Anonymous Hamster
          • 7 years ago

          Ah, for controlling the KVM itself, you’d need a wireless setup that appears on the USB end as a standard HID keyboard/mouse, not a Bluetooth device. Different protocols.

    • Krogoth
    • 7 years ago

    You should try Matia’s keyboard line. They use the old “Alps” style switches that were found on old Apple keyboards.

    They provide practically the same tactile feedback as buckle springs, but they are as quiet as any membrane-based keyboard.

    Alps switches have a very interesting history behind them and became close to extinction a few times.

      • MadManOriginal
      • 7 years ago

      So you’re not impressed by Cherry switches?

      Also, you forgot to say that ‘there is no need for mechanical keyboards for the average user.’

      • Airmantharp
      • 7 years ago

      That’s the first explanation of the Alps I’ve heard, thanks!

      After using Blue’s in a Razor product, which were too light and too loud, I went with a Rosewill with Browns, and I like them. But I remember those Apple keyboards, so pleasant to type on.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 7 years ago

      Those are the keyboards I learned on back in the day.

    • anotherengineer
    • 7 years ago

    CYRIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    When are you guys going to test out one of these with Cherry clears?!?!?!

    [url<]http://www.deckkeyboards.com/product_info.php?products_id=96[/url<] That is something that would even more interesting than these greens, curiously though, I wonder what switch they used for the shift, enter, etc. if they were that much stiffer?!?!

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 7 years ago

      Interesting proposition.

      • destroy.all.monsters
      • 7 years ago

      Wow, that’s cheap and those fonts are ginormous (usually a good thing imo).

      Nice find!

    • boskone
    • 7 years ago

    I’ve always used browns because I like tactile, non-clicky keyboards. I also tend to keybash.

    I wonder how the springs from these would feel installed in brown switches.

    • no51
    • 7 years ago

    I have cherry blues, and I’ve always felt that they were a bit light. I might have to give these a try.

      • AMD64Blondie
      • 7 years ago

      Now if Unicomp would release a Customizer 101 based on these Cherry Green MX switches..that might be interesting.

      I currently own a pair of IBM Model M keyboards,and I love them for their clickyness and classic style.

    • csroc
    • 7 years ago

    Hmm the browns have been my favorite so far but I have a fairly heavy hand when typing and bottom them out a lot. This sounds like something I’d love to try, just wish there were more options for keyboards using them.

    There are a lot of ergo keyboards out there but I honestly would like to see the MS natural keyboard gain a mechanical cousin based on these. Even at double the price of the current 4000 model I’d jump on it.

      • anotherengineer
      • 7 years ago

      [url<]http://www.trulyergonomic.com/store/index.php[/url<]

    • superjawes
    • 7 years ago

    5318008

      • Chrispy_
      • 7 years ago

      Like a broken record-player.

        • Sam125
        • 7 years ago

        [url<]http://bit.ly/WZshZz[/url<]

          • superjawes
          • 7 years ago

          At least someone can enjoy a joke 😆

          I was just glad to get it in before the Model M cult arrived.

            • just brew it!
            • 7 years ago

            Hey, I like Model Ms. But I like my Cherry blue RK-9000 even better!

            • Sam125
            • 7 years ago

            Just say “no” to cults.

            +1 for appreciating that that I can appreciate a joke. 🙂

    • Chrispy_
    • 7 years ago

    Yet another mechanical that’s not ergonomic 🙁

    I get it – ergonomic keyboards aren’t as popular as straight ones, but damn – once you get used to one it’s hard to go back to not using one. You’d think there’d be a few more ergo mechanical models around, right? I mean the rubber-dome ergo keyboards keep selling well enough so why can’t they get some Cherry MX love too?

      • Bauxite
      • 7 years ago

      The layout of most ergos is flawed, if its “more comfortable” to use one it usually means “you’re holding it wrong”.

      (aka your posture/desk/chair/etc arrangement is the real problem)

        • Chrispy_
        • 7 years ago

        Yeah, I thought I’d get downranked for that :\

        Please link to a reputable study that shows ergonomic layouts are [b<]bad for you[/b<] and that I'm "[i<]holding it wrong[/i<]." My desk posture is at least close to correct, and since I have to use laptops almost as much as desktops, I get to use standard keyboards in a huge range of different positions - on the floor, in an aircraft seat, on the sofa etc. It's not that I'm lazy or that using straight keyboards causes me any pain, just that I prefer not to kink my wrists or my fingers; On a standard keyboard you have to bend either the wrists or the fingers, otherwise your fingers lie naturally on [i<]AERFIJO;[/i<] rather than the usual [i<]ASDFJKL;[/i<] (try it - If your fingers don't do this then you either have narrow shoulders or you are curling some fingers more than others) Almost 30 years of daily paino playing means I have supple, powerful fingers that I notice are not being fully extended (which is bad) when using a normal keyboard. I also know it's bad to train your fingers to curl different amounts on a long-term basis because this induces lactic acid buildup from holding it unnaturally in the extensor digitorum muscles of the forearm. Whether or not you think I'm sitting at my desk wrong or not, I'm merely disappointed that there aren't (m)any decent ergonomic keyboards that cater to people who know how their anatomy actually works, and would like a keyboard to suit it.

      • anotherengineer
      • 7 years ago

      above link
      [url<]http://www.trulyergonomic.com/store/index.php[/url<]

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 7 years ago

      Ergo is a relative term, really there isn’t allot that is ergonomical about a standard full keyboard with a mouse adjacent because you can never be truly centered on your desk, you will inevitably develop a lopsided back posture no matter the keyboard because the mouse will always make things A symmetrical. That is why for every study that shows ergo keyboards work their is another study that shows they don’t do anything but change the nature of the problem. One of the thoughts about tasks like using a computer at a desk where you can never make the task truly ergo friendly is to make it uncomfortable and shorten the user exposure to it. In the event that prolonged exposure is inevitable; focusing on better chairs, monitor elevation and tilt and location, and desk location/keyboard height etc is shown to have more benefits than the ergo keyboard itself.

      Not trying to po po your idea, as really you are right they should make products for discerning consumers who want it. Makes no sense why they don’t have the mechanical ergo keyboard. Just discussing the Ergo merits of any such products based on research I did back in school. 🙂

    • MadManOriginal
    • 7 years ago

    I started reading this and was thinking ‘Hey, it would be great if there were sound recordings to compare these’ and then I read some more. Nice 🙂 I do wonder something though…it sounds like you are fully bottoming the switches and trying to make them as noisy as possible. That would be accurate for some people, but chassis resonance or noise would be reduced for those who adjust properly to mechanical switches and press them enough to activate but not bottom out.

    I wonder about this though “The key caps feel more firmly seated than on the Rosewill” How, do the keycaps fit onto the Cherry stems tighter? Is there another interface between than keycap stem and the switch stem, like the sides of the switches at the base, or maybe the keycap stem is wider? A pic of the inside of a kaycap would be neat, otherwise I’m not sure how one is ‘more firm’ than the other if the only interface is the keycap stem and switch stem.

      • Cyril
      • 7 years ago

      I’m only bottoming out hard with the first three keystrokes. The rest is regular touch typing, which doesn’t involve any excessively strong key presses.

      As for the key caps, they do fit a little tighter on the Cherry stems. I noticed that they’re harder to remove on the Trigger using the same extractor tool. Also, there’s a tiny little bit of play between the switches and the backplate on the Rosewill, but not on the Trigger.

        • just brew it!
        • 7 years ago

        It could also be that the stiffer springs result in less overall play/slop in the switch mechanism itself. This could give an overall “tighter” impression.

        Cherry’s gotta be loving the current resurgence in mechanical keyboards. I bet sales of their switch mechanisms has gone through the roof.

      • mrmrogden
      • 7 years ago

      So i think most of the varieties of cherry mx switches come in 2 variations, PCB mounted & plate mounted and how these are constructed and or the materials used along with the frame of the keyboard, well just about everything about the design can make the same type of switch feel, sound somewhat different and i think i have even run across some little sound dampening rings. I do not know for sure how many companies make the key caps used. So i know this just makes it harder, because where can any of us go to try all of these variations out. I tend to look at a companies own description of how & what the keyboards are made of or you might find a video review that disassembles the keyboard in question. As far as this keyboard with green switches goes as of right now as far as i can tell it is the only one available. With any other cherry switch i would want a plate mounted switch and as much weight as possible and as much information on the construction as you can get. As far as this keyboard is concerned though the biggest potential problem after reading reviews is the cable connection and the little PCB it is mounted on as some people who have reviewed the trigger other places have complained about it being weak, but i also noticed on a recent review where they showed the USB PCB for this keyboard it was marked Ver. 3.0 so the issue may have been fixed. I myself need the green switch as i have neuropathy and my old omnikey alps switches along with the keyboard are 22 years old and the strong tactile clicky switches are exactly what i need and the back lit keyboard with them is exactly what i need. The largest problem i have encountered with this keyboard is getting it as you can only get the green switch model from the CM store. I ordered mine 3/6 and received a brown switch model on 3/14 shipped it back 3/15 and had to .. So 3/26 is the ups delivery date at which point i will find out if the person who shipped this one is illiterate and color blind.

    • destroy.all.monsters
    • 7 years ago

    Wow, can’t wait to try one of these.

    This resurgence of mechanical keyboards is a happy thing.

      • Thresher
      • 7 years ago

      Personally, I don’t get it, but whatever floats your boat.

      I prefer the higher end Logitechs. I guess they have some sort of membrane contact, but they don’t feel cheap.

      I type all day on a Logitech and love it.

        • Deanjo
        • 7 years ago

        Ya, not sure what the appeal is personally but everyone has their own preference. I’m most comfortable, accurate and fastest on an old Tandy 1000 ex with its built in keyboard but I also love the fact that I can knock out an elephant with an old Tandy 1200 keyboard. ;D

          • MadManOriginal
          • 7 years ago

          I found a mechanical keyboard that would be perfect for you:

          [url<]http://mechanicalkeyboards.com/shop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=26[/url<]

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 7 years ago

        Going from a Logitech G15 original, I have to disagree. I’ve noticed a huge difference in feel and typing reliability in my Razer Black Widow Ultimate Stealth (not the stupid green-light version either). I tried the original Black Widow Ultimate (with Cherry Blue’s) and just as this review states, the audio of those blues is so shrill and high pitched I could never get used to it.

        When I realized that Razer was going to replace all their keyboards with versions that had green backlighting, I went ahead and took the bullet, bought the Stealth with the blue lights before they replaced it. I am the sucker who wants my peripherals to match (Razer BWU, Razer Naga).

        So comparing the G15, the BWU, and the BWUS, I found the typing experience of the two BWU’s far superior to the Logitech. The mechanical really is much nicer. I do wish they were quieter, though. Even the Browns are relatively loud.

          • tanker27
          • 7 years ago

          I think your problem here is the “gaming” keyboards and their implementation of the Cherry switches. I dont like any of the mechanical offerings from Logitech, Razor, and others that have mechanical “gaming” keyboards. They feel and sound different to me. I dont know what is it about them, they are for all intensive purposes, the same Cherry switches but they suck.

          You cant pry my Deck or my Real Cherry G83 from my hands. Try a real Mechanical keyboard.

            • destroy.all.monsters
            • 7 years ago

            I’d love to try those too but I can never find those anywhere. At least the gaming ones can be had for under a hundred and are at Fry’s. I understand Logitech finally joined the mechanical crowd and those should be fun to play with.

            Did you not like the Corsair K-series either?

            • tanker27
            • 7 years ago

            I havent tried Corsair’s offering.

        • kamikaziechameleon
        • 7 years ago

        they don’t wear well over time. IMHO a 2 year old or 5 year old logitech feels totally different than a factory fresh. The dome types they use degrade tangibly. They loose responsiveness and sturdiness and become mushy overtime. I work on such keyboards and have for most my life.

          • Deanjo
          • 7 years ago

          I don’t know about that, my G15 v1 still has great feel and is comparable to the new G510 that I have.

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