Cooler Master’s QuickFire Ultimate mechanical keyboard reviewed

Mechanical keyboards have enjoyed quite the renaissance over the past few years. As someone who logs tens of thousands of keystrokes a day, I’m quite pleased with the trend. The smooth, precise feel of mechanical key switches is far superior to the mushy, lifeless response of the rubber domes typically found in desktop keyboards. Once you’ve used a high-quality keyboard, it’s hard to go back to inferior switches.

Just about every peripheral maker seems to have a few mechanical models in its arsenal. The latest one to pass through our labs is the Cooler Master QuickFire Ultimate, which is sold under the CM Storm brand. This entry combines adjustable backlighting with a range of Cherry MX switch types. It’s a relatively straightforward example of the breed and a particularly beastly one at that.

The QuickFire Ultimate doesn’t have an imposing footprint, but it tips the scales at a relatively heavy 3 lbs (1.4 kg). Much of the weight comes from a steel plate embedded inside the chassis. This solid slab gives the keyboard excellent rigidity and a particularly solid feel. The frame barely twists in my hands—and I even lift, bro.

A tough plastic body surrounds the keyboard’s metal foundation. The exterior surfaces have no give, and their flat black finish resists fingerprints and smudges. I dig the chunky, understated styling.

Perhaps due to its overbuilt body, the QuickFire Ultimate is a little taller than typical mechanical keyboards. The front edge of the bottom row sits at a height of 1.37″ (35 mm), which is 0.24″ (6 mm) higher than on the Das Keyboard Pro Silent and Cooler Master QuickFire Stealth—two other mechanical keyboards that are floating around the lab right now. The difference is especially noticeable due to the QuickFire Ultimate’s lack of an integrated wrist rest. That said, I have no problems typing comfortably with my wrists resting lightly on my desk. I’ve been using the QuickFire Ultimate as my daily driver for several weeks without any discomfort.

With the rear tilt stands folded flat, the top edge of the back row sits 1.77″ (45 mm) tall. The slope of the keyboard is a little steeper than on the Das, whose keys rise only 0.31″ (8 mm) between the top and bottom edges. For those who prefer an even steeper angle, the back of the QuickFire can be raised to 2.04″ (52 mm).

The full-sized layout puts all the right keys in all the right places. Cooler Master swaps the Windows menu key for a function modifier, but that’s the only deviation from the norm. If it ain’t broke, well, you know.

Like most mechanical keyboards, the QuickFire has slightly concave key caps that keep one’s fingers centered. The caps have the same smooth finish as the body, and the spacing is just right for my meaty digits to hammer away unencumbered. Under my usual heavy-handed typing, each keystroke delivers the crisp ka-chunk I’ve come to associate with mechanical switches.

The QuickFire Ultimate is available with a range of Cherry MX switches to suit different tastes. The model we tested has Cherry MX brown switches and white backlighting. Cooler Master also offers variants with MX red and blue switches, complete with matching backlight colors. A special, Canadian-only model combines blue switches with red backlighting. Those colors don’t really fit the Canadian flag, but they nicely match the Montreal Canadiens logo, which is nearly as iconic north of the border.

The MX brown switches have a tactile “bump” at the actuation point but no accompanying click. The MX blue switches offer both tactile and audible feedback, but the MX red switches have a linear stroke that’s devoid of both. There are also differences in actuation and bottom-out force. Stiffer springs give the MX blue switches heavier weighting than the brown and red variants. A detailed comparison of the main MX switch types is available in Cyril’s Rosewill RK-9000 round-up. Tactile switches are generally preferred for typing, while linear switches are prized in some gaming circles.


On the QuickFire Ultimate, each key is lit by its own LED. Click the buttons below the image to turn the lights on and off. The model we tested also has a white layer under the keys that glows faintly when the backlighting is enabled. This little touch nicely illuminates the borders between the key caps, as illustrated below.


The LEDs can be configured to shine steadily, pulse slowly, or only highlight the directional and WASD keys. The pulsing mode cycles through a range of brightness levels smoothly, while the other options offer five different brightness levels. Users also have the option of disabling the backlighting completely, of course.

With the brightness turned down, the white backlighting looks very subtle. Unfortunately, it’s not entirely even. Some of the key caps glow with a yellowish tinge, and the same tone is visible in the upper right corner, where it permeates the backlit logo and lock indicators. The off-white tint doesn’t look too bad, but it does differ from the pristine glow of the alpha keys.

While I’m griping about little details, I should mention that the QuickFire Ultimate has a hint of backlight bleed. Four bright LEDs shine through the gap between the frame and the spacebar. They’re only visible when I slouch, which happens a lot toward the end of the day, and they’re pretty glaring even with the backlight brightness turned down.

Shortcut keys in the function row cover backlight adjustments and basic media controls. The associated function key can be used as a modifier or toggled into an always-on mode that allows secondary shortcuts to be invoked by pressing a single key.

Additional shortcuts are available to disable the Windows key and tweak a couple of other attributes. The polling rate can be set to one, two, four, or eight milliseconds (which correspond to 1000Hz, 500Hz, 250Hz, and 125Hz, respectively), though I couldn’t tell the difference between the various rates. My reflexes have worsened with age, and they were never that twitchy to begin with. Users also have the option of switching between six- and n-key rollover modes. N-key rollover is only supported in Windows.

The QuickFire Ultimate frustratingly fails to indicate which polling rate and rollover mode is active at any given moment. All the keys are illuminated equally, regardless of the setting. The Fn and Windows-lock keys are a little more intelligent. Both go dark when the associated functions are toggled off.

Unlike some higher-end keyboards, the QuickFire Ultimate lacks programmable macro keys and extra USB connectivity. Apart from the backlighting and media shortcuts, the keyboard is relatively short on extras.

Cooler Master includes a removable USB cable, though. The cable attaches securely, and grooves in the base provide additional grip. These tight-fitting channels run the cable out the back or either side of the keyboard. They prevent tugging from straining the connection between the cable and keyboard, which is often a point of weakness on detachable designs.

As long as it’s run along the correct route, the cable’s 6′ length should be sufficient for most system configurations. The neatly braided exterior nicely matches the keyboard’s tough-but-understated aesthetic, too.

The only other inclusion of note is a basic key puller. This simple accessory can remove key caps in seconds, making it easy to strip the keyboard and clean the underlying base. Any debris that slips between the keys is especially visible against the white underlay, so obsessive-compulsive types may find themselves itching to clean this keyboard more frequently than other mechanical models.

Quirks aside, I’ve become quite attached to the QuickFire Ultimate. The overall feel is excellent, and I really enjoy typing on the thing. This may be the sturdiest mechanical keyboard around, at least among the new breed.

Newegg is selling the MX brown and MX blue versions of the QuickFire Ultimate for $110. The MX Red flavor isn’t available at Newegg, but Amazon has it for $108, albeit with a two-month lead time. Those prices seem about right, all things considered. The QuickFire Ultimate doesn’t have as many features as more exotic models. However, it’s built like a tank and offers full backlighting, all of the basics, and quality Cherry MX mechanical switches throughout.

The QuickFire’s high profile will likely be a poor fit for folks who prefer low-slung keyboards. For everyone else, this is an excellent mid-range option—and is TR recommended.

Comments closed
    • anotherengineer
    • 6 years ago

    ” This may be the sturdiest mechanical keyboard around, ”

    [url<]http://www.deckkeyboards.com/product/deck-legend[/url<] 3.5 lbs!! Hmmm looks like Deck gave their entire line a make over and even added a few more. Don't see any cherry clear switches though............Booooooooo Deck Booooooooooo

    • MarkG509
    • 6 years ago

    So, call me a sucker for back-lit plate-mounted MX-Browns. I ordered one shortly after reading this review, and especially the comments. (I’m writing this after all-day off-site meetings, so please take it with a grain of salt.)

    Random negative thoughts, all IMHO:
    The key-top graphics suck. The big-blobs of back-lit white castle-shaped function indicators are very distracting. Placing the shifted-key symbols *under* the unshifted base functions (see number row) is just wrong. Rosewill RK9001* keyboards win on this point.
    The lowest setting of the back-light is not low enough, and the lighting of the white back plate makes this worse. I’m considering popping off the key-tops and spray-painting the white back-plate a flat black. I’m further considering adding o-rings to mostly to reduce the lighting effect, as opposed to changing the timber/volume of the bottoming sound (see next).
    Bottoming the keys makes a hallow loud thud sound. I compare that to a crisp not-loud-at-all crack from my current favorite (though neither plate mounted nor back-lit) MX-brown Filco. Adding o-rings would help this too.
    The Caps-/Num-/Scroll-Lock indicators are excessive, especially given the silly back-lit logo-thing. Duct-tape, generously applied, will fix this. A few coats of black Sharpie on the function-key-blobs may help, too.
    In Win 7 x64 Pro, I have the Repeat Rate max’d and the Repeat Delay min’d. That’s unusual. There’s plenty of room left in those settings in Linux.

    With that said, this is now my second overall favorite keyboard, and my favorite back-lit (versus Rosewill and X-Armour)..

    • CityEater
    • 6 years ago

    Whups mis post sorry

    • Crackhead Johny
    • 6 years ago

    “The QuickFire Ultimate frustratingly fails to indicate which polling rate and rollover mode is active at any given moment.”

    Umm, wouldn’t the rollover be indicated by which port you plugged it into? PS/2 for NKRO or USB for 6KRO? Unless I missed something, keyboard makers are still working on NKRO on USB.

    If you are plugged into PS/2 why would you want to switch from NKRO to 6KRO?

      • just brew it!
      • 6 years ago

      NKRO over USB is a solved problem, but it requires a custom device driver since it is a limitation inherent in the standard USB keyboard protocol. Vast majority of keyboard vendors don’t bother.

      Not sure why anyone would need more than 6KRO, given that modifier keys don’t count in the total.

        • Crackhead Johny
        • 6 years ago

        I think the reason that people would prefer NKRO is
        1. More is better. Or better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it.
        2. Facerolling in WoW. You wouldn’t want the keyboard to miss any of the inputs as you roll your face across the keyboard.

    • just brew it!
    • 6 years ago

    From the article: “The polling rate can be set to one, two, four, or eight milliseconds (which correspond to 125Hz, 250Hz, 500Hz, and 1000Hz, respectively)”

    Strike that. Reverse it. Thank you.

      • Dissonance
      • 6 years ago

      Facepalm. Fixed.

    • Canageek
    • 6 years ago

    Alright, I know this is going to make me a pariah, but I don’t get mechanical keyboards. They tire my fingers out faster, and they make a hellish amount of noise. I want something nice and quite so I don’t annoy the people around me, and while I do like some feedback when I push, damn, why do you want to have to hammer them that hard?

    Personally, I like the Microsoft Natural Keyboard series; I’ve used them since they were white and plastic, and have an early elite model (Back when it was still split). A bit soft for my tastes, but the pleather hand-rest and split design make it a dream to type on.

    But really, someone explain why you want to hammer on the keyes that hard to me? I listen to live streams and you can constantly hear the clickclickclick in the background, so I know they are popular.

      • just brew it!
      • 6 years ago

      The point isn’t to hammer them so that they bottom out hard; the tactile “bump” trains your fingers to exert just enough force to actuate the keys; they’ll still tend to bottom out, but not *hard*. (This of course only applies to the blue/brown/clear/green/white flavors, not the red/black.) For me, the ultimate keyboard experience is MX blue switches with damping rings to cut the “clack” when the keys do bottom out.

      That said, it is definitely a matter of personal preference. I don’t find the MX blues to be stiff at all; they actually require less force and have less key travel than the Model M (and clones). But to each their own.

      • CMRajiv
      • 6 years ago

      We created an article on our cmuniversity.net website. I’d recommend you to check it out 🙂

      • superjawes
      • 6 years ago

      There are two different sounds that can be produced by a mechanical keyboard. The first is the clicking of the switch, but this only happens on Cherry Blue switches, at least in the normal Blue, Brown, Red, Black set.

      The second sound comes from bottoming out, as JBI said. The keycap is hard plastic, the outside of the switch is hard plastic, and more likely than not, those switches are housed on a hard plastic board (Rosewills are metal), so when the switch bottoms out, it produces a very loud sound. The good news is that you can virtually silence the bottoming out noise by installing dampening effects like those available from WASD Keyboards.

      So if you can eliminate the bottoming out noise, you might find the clicking of the blues to your liking. I know I do.

      On the typing fatigue side, you might want to try something with a softer response, like Brown or Red switches. You might also find that a tactile response makes you type a little lighter so that you stop bottoming out, resulting in less fatigue. There’s also the possibility that you just need a little finger exercise to get used to mechanical switches 😛

      I like the feel of Blues the best because I like the response. Browns just seem too light, and without the audible feedback, I feel like I would be just as well of using Black switches with a linear response. All are preferable to robber domes, which just feel mushy and require too much force to use now. But it all comes down to personal preference.

    • lyeoh
    • 6 years ago

    What’s the latency like? Can you do some tests? I had an old PS/2 keyboard that was high latency – I compared it with a low latency mouse.

    • anotherengineer
    • 6 years ago

    Nice little review.

    Still waiting on TR to do a cherry clear keyboard though, [url<]http://codekeyboards.com[/url<]

      • Freon
      • 6 years ago

      Same here. I have an ABS with Cherry Brown but think my next will be Cherry Clear with some sort of backlighting. The Code Keyboard is high on my list.

    • Herem
    • 6 years ago

    I don’t like the way the primary key functions are inconsistently depicted on the keyboard. The top of the keyboard has numbers displayed and lit above the unlit upper case alternatives while the , . / keys are unlit and shown below the upper case versions < > ?.

    Whichever scheme the manufacture decides to use they should at least try and remain consistent across the keyboard!

      • BiggieShady
      • 6 years ago

      Valid argument, it’s like this since the first quickfire keyboard and it’s irritating

    • NarwhaleAu
    • 6 years ago

    Now if only they would think outside the box, and just give it a slight curve so that I’m not cramped up when I type.

    Then, then I would be sold!

      • BIF
      • 6 years ago

      I agree. I still use a 15 year old Microsoft Ergo keyboard because anything straight makes my forearms hurt.

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 6 years ago

        Ergonomics or bust for yous!

        Myself? I tried straight keyboards, then went several generations of Microsoft ergonomic keyboards.

        Then I went back. Glad I did. Ergonomic keyboards cause more strain than they fix for me.

    • Meadows
    • 6 years ago

    Is it only available with that dinky US Enter key, or does it come with a real layout?

      • Firestarter
      • 6 years ago

      The definition of a “real layout” varies wildly across the world. I for one consider the US layout to be the “real” one.

        • morphine
        • 6 years ago

        Hint: the proper large Enter key is an ISO standard 🙂

          • Meadows
          • 6 years ago

          ISO > ANSI

            • just brew it!
            • 6 years ago

            And “what you’ve been using most of your life and have gotten used to” > ISO. 😉

          • just brew it!
          • 6 years ago

          Like ISO is infallible?

            • Firestarter
            • 6 years ago

            ISO is *always* right

            • Meadows
            • 6 years ago

            You contradict yourself.

        • BIF
        • 6 years ago

        By digging at his “real layout” phrasing, you are ignoring his major point. And that is that small “enter” keys are difficult for some people.

          • Firestarter
          • 6 years ago

          Difficult? It’s still 3x as large as any normal key.

      • bthylafh
      • 6 years ago

      FSVO “real”. Big enter keys inevitably make Backspace too small to reach easily or move the pipe/backslash where it’s annoying to get to.

        • Meadows
        • 6 years ago

        My Backspace is even wider than Enter, and the backslash is right comfy under my left ring finger… in the odd event that I accidentally need it. (I almost never use it ever since the DOS days ended.)

          • just brew it!
          • 6 years ago

          Software developers and *NIX CLI users still make pretty heavy use of the vertical bar (pipe) character.

            • stdRaichu
            • 6 years ago

            Not just *nix guys – powershell also makes pretty heavy uses of pipes as well now. I’m both 🙂

            Being in the UK however, I personally can’t imagine it being anywhere else other than the bottom left of the keyboard.

            • just brew it!
            • 6 years ago

            You crazy Brits… 😀

            • Meadows
            • 6 years ago

            It actually *does* make sense to me too. Never in my life have I *ever* pressed Shift with my left hand. Who even does that?

            • just brew it!
            • 6 years ago

            I use my left hand to shift almost exclusively. Maybe you meant right? Or maybe you’re just weird… 😉

            • Meadows
            • 6 years ago

            No, I meant it like I said it the first time. I never ever press the left Shift outside of videogames that explicitly require it. I wouldn’t know how to type properly at all without the right Shift.

            Edit: and I’m not a slow typist, either.

            • just brew it!
            • 6 years ago

            Maybe it is time for a poll!

            (I wonder if the results depend on whether people are left- or right-handed?)

            Edit: “Proper” touch typing technique requires that you use the hand opposite the one which would normally hit the key being shifted. So I guess we’re both weird…

            • Meadows
            • 6 years ago

            If it matters any, I’m left-handed.

            Edit: and have used right-hand mice all my life and can’t use a mouse in the left hand.

            • just brew it!
            • 6 years ago

            Hmm… there may be something to that. For those of us who don’t touch-type the way they teach you in school, I’ll bet there’s a slight bias towards using the favored hand to hit the primary key, and the other hand to hit the modifier. I.e. use the less dexterous hand for hitting the modifier, since it is a larger target!

            • Melvar
            • 6 years ago

            I’m sure I don’t have “Proper” touch typing technique, but I almost never use right shift. I have fairly big hands though. I can hit LShift-P or RShift-W with one hand.

            I’m right handed, but I tend to do more of my typing with my left hand.

            • brucek2
            • 6 years ago

            Anyone who is capitalizing a letter that appears on the right hand side of the keyboard?

            or anyone who games (particularly, MMOs) with the mouse in their right hand and wants to be able to double up on keybinds on the left by making say shift-2 different from 2, shift-3 different from 3, etc.

            • just brew it!
            • 6 years ago

            I use the left shift even for stuff on the left side. I hit the shift with my pinky and use my middle or index finger for the other key, or cross my right hand over depending on where the key is. Yes, I have my own weird typing technique. Been doing it this way for over 30 years, and can go as fast as a reasonably good touch typist (so definitely not hunt-and-peck, even though it is nothing like textbook typing technique).

      • just brew it!
      • 6 years ago

      Layouts with the larger Enter key typically make the Backspace key too small. I’ll take the smaller Enter key with the full-size Backspace key, thank you very much.

    • XTF
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Cooler Master swaps the Windows menu key for a function modifier, but that's the only deviation from the norm.[/quote<] The Win keys are there but smaller than normal. Unfortunately the context menu key isn't present.

      • just brew it!
      • 6 years ago

      I generally find non-standard layouts infuriating. I don’t think these changes would bother me though, as the important keys are all still in their proper locations. (I’ve never really gotten into using the context menu key, so I don’t much care if it is missing).

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 6 years ago

    Naturally I came to the comments and didn’t read the article, so imma make this short. Does this keyboard light up 10 seconds after you push the key?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 6 years ago

      No, it lights up when you’re queuing up actions in your brain. IT READS MINDS!!!!

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 6 years ago

        That’s something I can buy. Thanks!!

        I wish you could see who did the downvotes. I like to see who’s hatin’.

          • Meadows
          • 6 years ago

          Top of the morning to you.

    • spuppy
    • 6 years ago

    The first manufacturer to make backlit keyboard with amber LEDs gets all my money.

      • Melvar
      • 6 years ago

      This should work: [url<]https://techreport.com/news/25894/cherry-mx-rgb-switches-give-corsair-keyboard-technicolor-glow[/url<] Unfortunately, it isn't scheduled for release until the second half of the year.

      • superjawes
      • 6 years ago

      Nobody wants amber. The point of backlighting is to look super cool at shows and in marketing, and everyone loves the bright, piercing power of blue LEDs!

      /sarcasm

      You actually bring up a really good point, and I think it’s really weird that no one thinks to use amber…

        • HisDivineOrder
        • 6 years ago

        [quote<]The point of backlighting is to look super cool at shows and in marketing, and everyone loves the bright, piercing power of blue LEDs![/quote<] So true. That really is the point. Otherwise, why have lights in the first place? Blue really is the best color. Not sure why anyone thinks green or amber are better options because they make their systems ugly. Subjectively, of course.

          • superjawes
          • 6 years ago

          No, backlighting can be used so that you can make out the keys in a low-light environment. In this case amber is the best color because it isn’t that bright, but would make the keys easily identifiable when the user looks down.

          And this is an objective analysis. It is why amber is used in automotive applications, where you really, really don’t want to be shining bright lights in the driver’s eyes.

        • stdRaichu
        • 6 years ago

        Annoyingly depressingly true. I eventually settled on a Qpad MK-80 for my keyboard since it used Cherry blues, but comes with slightly glaring backlighting. I would much have preferred a version with red LEDs but those only seem to exist for keyboards with Cherry reds which I don’t get on with. A quick glance over other mechanical keyboards shows that many other manufacturers insist on using the same colour-coding.

        Incidentally, isn’t red light far less disruptive to “night vision” than amber?

          • superjawes
          • 6 years ago

          My Google-Fu needs some work…I can’t immediately find any articles on what I would call “ergonomic lighting.” At least nothing in terms of light coloring.

          I would think that amber has two advantages over red. First, I think it offers more clarity than red without dialing up the brightness. Second, it is not immediately associated with emergencies. Regardless of your switch colors, you typically have warning lamps classified by color, where red is more “stop the vehicle now!” and amber/yellow is “hey, you might want to check this.” In this sense, amber backlighting lets those more severe red warnings stand out, too.

            • stdRaichu
            • 6 years ago

            Well there’s a brief run-down here on red vs. amber for low-light situations here: [url<]http://www.candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?94083-Red-vs-Amber-Orange-LEDs[/url<] The poster there also prefers amber, personally I prefer red backlighting to suit my most common use for needing a backlit keyboard - typing in a darkened room with a white-on-black text editor. For stuff like gaming I'll still sometimes need a backlight where the glare of blue isn't as distracting, but red is still preferable to my eyes at least. But yes, the paucity of different colours for keyboard is annoying, notwithstanding mnemonick's mention of Ducky Shine below, who, as I've just found out, do make a [url=http://www.kustompcs.co.uk/acatalog/info_30188.html<]red backlit keyboard with MX blues in a UK keymap[/url<]. I don't drive so I don't really have any preference on emergency lights 🙂 But in any case, there's a marked difference between ambient backlighting and indication lights IMO.

            • WulfTheSaxon
            • 6 years ago

            Lots of links: [url<]http://justgetflux.com/research.html[/url<] (great utility btw)

      • mnemonick
      • 6 years ago

      Allow me to introduce you to the Ducky Shine II: [url<]http://www.duckychannel.com.tw/en/DK9008_shine2.html[/url<] (scroll down for color options) You can find them for ~$140 online from several popular resellers.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 6 years ago

    I have the Quick Fire Pro, which as far as I can tell is the same board with a different back light scheme and I love it. I did mod it with o rings for noise but otherwise it is fantastic.

      • tay
      • 6 years ago

      Did the O-rings help with comfort or fatigue as well?

    • Bensam123
    • 6 years ago

    After using a Corsair keyboard they all seem subpar. It’s something about that industrial aluminum and recessing the frame enough so the keys stand out that really gives it aesthetic appeal. The keys naturally have accent lighting from the lights on the keys themselves because of the recessed edges.

    Interesting review though. Most of the mechanicals are in the same league now with only a handful standing out.

      • HisDivineOrder
      • 6 years ago

      Too many reports of Corsair keyboard failures for my tastes. I’m glad your go at the lottery was a winner, though.

        • tay
        • 6 years ago

        My CM Storm keyboard had the S key fail in under a year. Cherry Brown switches, and I don’t know how to replace or get a new switch. Very frustrating. I’ll go back to buying cheap keyboards that I can throw away every couple of years rather than expensive keyboards that I may have to throw away every couple of years or less.
        Pretty frustrated.

          • just brew it!
          • 6 years ago

          Odds are that the switch itself is fine, and what busted was the solder connection between the key and the PCB. Some of the later Rosewill RK-9000s are infamous for having this issue.

          If this is the failure you’ve experienced, 5 minutes with a soldering iron (you’ll spend more time getting the housing apart and back together) will make ‘er good as new.

            • tay
            • 6 years ago

            Thanks for the info. My problem is that the S key sticks and fires multiple times or, 80% of the time doesn’t fire at all.

            Does that seem like a solder issue? My friend has a soldering iron that I could borrow.

            If it’s not a solder issue, I can replace the switch using youtube tutorials.

            • just brew it!
            • 6 years ago

            Physically sticking (as in the key doesn’t move properly), or just misfiring? If the former, then the key itself is mechanically damaged; if the latter, then bad solder joint is a very likely culprit.

            Edit: Also, when resoldering the pins fully depress (bottom out) the key while doing so. This ensures that the switch is seated flush against the mounting plate and/or PCB, which will ensure that there is less stress on the solder connections going forward. Rosewill’s issue was that some of the switches were not mounted fully flush, so the solder joint (instead of the mounting plate) was taking the brunt of the impact when the key was depressed. Also, I suggest using old fashioned leaded solder instead of the newfangled lead-free stuff. It is easier to work with, and more durable. Though I suppose you may not be able to get leaded depending on where you live…

          • CMRajiv
          • 6 years ago

          Please let me know your contact info and what region you’re in. I’d be glad to help you.

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