Corsair’s Obsidian Series 450D enclosure reviewed

What’s this? Another Corsair Obsidian Series enclosure? These things are multiplying faster than Duggar children, but we’re not complaining. Some of our favorite PC cases come from the Obsidian Series, which combines understated styling with builder-friendly features and robust cooling capacity.

The Obsidian Series runs the gamut from the bit-sized 250D, which is built for Mini-ITX boards, to the gargantuan 900D tower, which stands over two feet tall. Between those extremes lies the 350D, a generously proportioned microATX mini-tower, along with the 750D, a larger mid-tower that can take ATX motherboards in addition to EATX and XL-ATX fare.

All the bases would seem to be covered, but there’s a gap—and I don’t just mean in the model numbers. You see, the 750D is pretty big for an ATX case. It’s more of a mid-major than a typical mid-tower. The 350D has more manageable proportions, but it’s limited to microATX motherboards and the accompanying expansion trade-offs. Where’s the ATX mini-tower between those two models?

Right here:

This stately entry is the Obsidian Series 450D. Depending on how one looks at the thing, it’s either a larger version of the 350D or a smaller variant of the 750D. Either way, the 450D sits between the two. It measures 19.5″ x 8.3″ x 19.6″ for a total volume of 3172 cubic inches. The 350D is 17.3″ x 8.3″ x 17.7″, or 2542 in³, while the 750D is 22.1″ x 9.3″ x 21.5″, or 4419 in³.

Since it also accepts ATX mobos, the 750D is probably the more appropriate reference point. The 450D is 28% smaller by volume than the 750D, and it very much feels like it. The more compact dimensions make the 450D much less obtrusive when it’s placed on or under a desk.

I’d be inclined to run the 450D in full view. It looks great, I think, with just the right combination of classic styling and a harder, more menacing edge. Brushed metal covers the front panels, and the rest of the case is a sea of stealthy, flat black finishes. There’s also a decent-sized window that provides a view of the internals.

A sparse collection of front-panel hardware occupies the top of the front face. Two USB 3.0 ports sit on the right, and Corsair leaves enough room around them for oversized thumb drives. Headphone and microphone connectors sit on the left along with the recessed reset button. That rectangular button in the middle of the top edge controls the power.

The power button is flanked by muted white LEDs associated with power and HDD activity. Those are the only lights in the entire case, which helps to maintain the 450D’s understated appearance.

Most members of the Obsidian family have solid front panels. The lower half of the 450D’s face, however, is heavily perforated to provide airflow to the dual 140-mm intake fans. The vented panel is backed by an additional layer of mesh, and the whole thing can be removed for cleaning. Depressing the top corners releases the latches holding the panel in place, allowing it to swing forward and be lifted away.

Removable dust filters are a recurring theme with the 450D. There’s another one covering the venting in the top panel:

This one is held in place by magnets, and so is the filter mounted below the bottom panel.

Oddly, the filter for the top panel has magnetic strips all the way around its exterior edges, while the one for the bottom is held in place by eight smaller magnets distributed around the rim. The lower filter sticks out a bit, and I inadvertently dislodged it several times when lifting the 450D from the bottom. The filter snaps back into place easily, though, and the magnets are otherwise strong enough to hold it in place.

Like its Obsidian kin, the 450D sits on stubby feet that elevate it about an inch off the ground. The resulting gap should allow cool air to be drawn into the enclosure through the bottom panel. The 450D doesn’t come with any bottom-mounted fans installed, though. The only other stock spinner is the 120-mm exhaust in the rear.

Around back, the 450D has punch-out holes for liquid coolers and ample ventilation for airflow. Thumbscrews hold the side panels in place, and they’re also used to secure the expansion slot covers. Seven slots should be enough for most system configurations, but it won’t be sufficient for quad CrossFire and SLI setups with double-wide cards. Of course, that limitation only rules out a tiny fraction of enthusiast PCs.

Now, let’s take a closer look inside…

Open for business

The internals have all the conveniences we’ve come to expect from the Obsidian Series. A huge cut-out in the motherboard tray provides unfettered access to CPU back plates, rubber-lined portals facilitate clean cable routing, and rolled edges prevent blood sacrifice. Corsair also puts a permanent stud in the middle of the motherboard tray, making it easy to center and install boards, especially with the case standing vertically.


Fresh from the factory, the drive cage sits in the lower front quadrant of the chassis. However, the cage can also hang from the bottom of the 5.25″ bays. Click the button below the image to see the alternate position.

With the cage in its original position, the 450D can handle expansion cards up to 16.9″ long—pretty much anything, in other words. Raising the cage limits clearance to 11.5″, which is still enough space for a GeForce GTX 780 or Radeon R9 290X. In this configuration, the lower mounting bracket can be removed to make room for a 240-mm radiator on the bottom panel.

With the cage in its original position, the bottom panel has room for a single 120- or 140-mm fan—provided the power supply doesn’t get in the way, that is. The 450D’s bottom-mounted PSU emplacement supports ATX units of pretty much any length, but there’s only 5.8″ of clearance between the left side of the PSU area and the edge of the first 140-mm fan mount.

The power supply sits on four raised rubber feet that should help to dampen vibration. Standard screws anchor the PSU to the rear panel, and sadly, they’re not of the thumb-friendly variety.

More cooling mounts can be found in the top panel, which has three fan emplacements and support for radiators up to 360 mm long. The pre-installed fans at the front and back can be swapped for radiators, too. The rear exhaust mount will take a 120-mm unit, and the front panel has enough room for a 280-mm one.

Surprisingly, only the 120-mm fan mounts in the top panel are lined with rubber grommets. All the other brackets are devoid of vibration-dampening materials, including the ones occupied by the stock spinners.

The motherboard tray is the only sizable surface that isn’t drilled to host fans and radiators. Corsair does include four rubber-lined cable-routing holes, however, and it leaves 0.8″ of clearance behind the tray for cabling. The company also includes a couple of cable tie-down points at the back of the tray. I would have liked more of those, since I’ve been known to go a little overboard with zip ties.

Hiding cables behind the tray requires a little more finesse than usual, because a large chunk of the available area is monopolized by a pair of 2.5″ drive bays. These bays sit low on the tray, under the motherboard’s expansion slots.

Similar tool-free bays are deployed in different ways across the Obsidian Series lineup. I believe this is the first time we’ve seen them hugging the bottom of the motherboard tray. In a moment, we’ll examine how that affects SSD temperatures. First, I should probably highlight the 450D’s other tool-free amenities.

Three sleds populate the main drive cage. Each one snaps onto 3.5″ drives without tools, but installing 2.5″ drives requires a screwdriver. Sticking thumbscrews on the sleds wouldn’t be practical, so that’s fine. However, I would have liked to see the main drive cage fastened down with thumbscrews rather than regular Philips heads. As it is, the cage takes a bit of extra work to reposition.

The latching mechanism for the 5.25″ bays is entirely tool-free. It holds optical drives reasonably tightly, though I still managed to push one loose while plugging in its power cable. Fortunately, optical drives can still be screwed down completely.

We’ve covered most of the following specifications already, but here’s the full list for easy comparison with our other enclosure reviews.

Corsair Obsidian Series 450D
Dimensions (H x W x D) 19.5″ x 8.3″ x 19.6″
Supported motherboards Mini-ITX, microATX, ATX
Expansion slots 7
3.5″/2.5″ drive bays 3
2.5″ drive bays 2
5.25″ drive bays 2
Fan mounts 8
Included Fans 2x 140-mm (Corsair AF140L) front intake

1x 120-mm (Corsair AF120L) rear exhaust

Front panel I/O 2x USB 3.0

Headphone

Microphone

Max. graphics card length 16.9″ or 11.5″, depending on drive bay config
Max. CPU cooler height 6.5″
Gap behind motherboard 0.8″

At this point, you’re probably more interested in what it’s like to build a system inside the 450D. So, let’s find out.

All built up

Corsair says its cases are “built for system builders,” and I have to agree. Our test system came together easily inside the 450D. The internals are definitely smaller than those of the 750D, but there’s still ample room to work.

Impressively, I could squeeze one of my XL-sized hands between the motherboard and the top panel to reach the auxiliary 12V connector. I had to come in from the opposite side of the CPU cooler, though, and adding a fan or radiator to the top panel would probably prohibit the maneuver.

Notice the wide open space behind the front top intake fan. The graphics card and CPU cooler should get a steady, unobstructed stream of fresh air with the default cage config.

The two fans sucking air into the case are offset by only one blowing out, which should give the 450D positive internal air pressure. In turn, that positive pressure should cut down on the amount of dust that gets drawn into the case. It should also aid blower-style graphics coolers designed to channel air out the back of the chassis.

The 450D has enough cable routing cut-outs to tuck excess wiring behind the motherboard tray. Corsair leaves a decent amount of clearance behind the tray, too, but again, I’d like to see additional tie-down points in the middle and along the right side. Having more anchoring points would make it easier to arrange the wiring around the 2.5″ bays.

Of course, the 2.5″ bays can be removed entirely if folks want more room behind the motherboard tray. The bays appear to be designed for 9.5-mm drives, so 7-mm SSDs like the Samsung 830 Series can sit a little crooked.

The tool-free latching mechanism still holds the drive in place, but a shim is required to keep everything flush. (A lot of thinner SSDs already ship with spacers for 9.5-mm bays.) Since SSDs don’t generate vibration, this is really only a cosmetic issue for them. I wouldn’t recommend installing a slim notebook hard drive without a spacer of some kind, though.

While I’m griping about drive bays, I should mention that the optical bay covers are a little wider than the actual openings. The bays are recessed, and removing the covers leaves strips of black plastic on either side of the drive. That’s not a big deal, I suppose, but it breaks up the brushed metal face more than I’d prefer.

Ok, enough about the 450D’s design quirks. How does the case perform?

Our testing methods

We tested the Obsidian Series 450D against its big brother, the 750D. Here are the components we used:

Processor Intel Core i7-2600K
Motherboard Asus P8Z77-V LE Plus
Memory 4GB Kingston HyperX DDR3 SDRAM at 1333MHz
Graphics card XFX Radeon HD 7870 Black Edition
Sound card Asus Xonar DG
Storage Samsung 830 Series 128GB

Samsung Spinpoint F3 1TB

Asus Blu-ray combo

Power supply Corsair HX750W 750W
CPU cooler Thermaltake Frio
OS Windows 8 Pro

We’d like to thanks Asus, Corsair, Kingston, Intel, Samsung, Thermaltake, and XFX for supplying all this excellent hardware.

We tested using the following applications:

The tests and methods we employed are publicly available and reproducible. If you have questions about our methods, hit our forums to discuss them with us.

Temperatures and noise levels

We used AIDA64 to keep track of temperatures for individual system components (the processor, GPU, motherboard, and storage drives) throughout a 40-minute period.

First, we left the system idle at the Windows 8 desktop for 10 minutes. Then, we fired up the Heaven GPU benchmark and left it running by itself for 10 minutes. After that, we added a Prime95 CPU torture test to the mix and left it running, together with the Heaven benchmark, for 10 minutes. Finally, we stopped both tests and let the system cool down for the final 10-minute stretch.

You may notice that the results for the 750D differ from those in our original review. That review was conducted last summer in Cyril’s lab, but the testing for this one was done in a cooler, quieter environment.

Here are the results, plotted as lines over time. You can click the buttons below the graph to see temperatures for the different components:


Our test rig’s CPU, graphics, motherboard, and mechanical hard drive all run slightly cooler in the 450D than in its larger sibling. The only exception is the SSD, which gets a bit warmer in the 450D. That’s likely because the drive is tucked behind the motherboard tray. The 750D’s SSD bays sit right by the intake fans, and so they’re exposed to a lot more airflow.

Although it might seem counter-intuitive for the other components to report cooler temperatures in the smaller 450D, remember the case’s heavily ventilated front panel. The 750D has the same dual 140-mm intake fans, but they’re hidden behind a solid front face, and they draw air through narrow gaps in the bezel.

The plots above depict broad trends; we can also give you exact numbers. The bar chart below shows the minimum temperatures from the idle and cooldown parts of the run. It also shows the highest temperatures recorded during the two load tests.


The differences amount to only a few degrees, so I wouldn’t get too worked up about them.

We measured noise levels using a TES-52 digital sound level meter placed 6″ from the front, side, and top of the case. Click the buttons below the graph to switch between the locations.


From the front, the 450D is noticeably louder than its big brother. It’s not exactly loud—the case generates a low, unobtrusive hum—but the fan noise is more apparent than with the 750D. The differences are smaller from the side and especially from above, where the two cases sound nearly identical.

I am curious to see how the 450D would fare with a solid front panel of its own. That might make it a little quieter.

Conclusions

I have a tendency to be somewhat cynical, so I’ll admit that my eyes rolled when I heard that Corsair was adding yet another case to its Obsidian Series lineup. However, the 450D does fill an important gap between the 350D and 750D. It brings the ATX motherboard compatibility of the 750D to a much smaller tower and a lower, $119 price point. Impressively, it does so without serious compromise.

The smaller chassis does have more limited expansion capacity than the 750D, but for most folks, those restrictions will be more academic than practical. The 450D can still accept a decent number of hard drives, SSDs, system fans, and liquid cooling radiators. There’s enough clearance for taller CPU heatsinks and longer graphics cards, too. Perhaps more importantly, the internals are roomy enough to work inside, even with a complete system installed. The open layout and ample cable routing options certainly help on that front.

The 450D’s spacious internals combine with its tool-free perks to make the building process a breeze. Having a few more thumbscrews and tie-down points would make system assembly even easier, but there’s little I’d change otherwise.

Well, maybe I’d change the front panel. The ventilated grill looks great, and the unobstructed intake definitely helps the 450D’s cooling performance. However, the venting also allows noise to escape, making the 450D louder from the front than the 750D. It would be nice to be able to swap in a solid front panel to match the rest of the Obsidian family. The case cools well enough that it should be able to survive with less intake airflow. I suspect a lot of folks would be happy to trade a few degrees for a few decibels.

Even in its current state, the 450D looks like a prime candidate for our System Guide. We’ve included the 750D for a while, but that case feels like overkill next to the new model. Our recommended builds are typically limited to one graphics card and a small collection of storage devices, and the 450D is simply a better fit for that class of system. It leaves room for modest growth, too.

The 450D isn’t so much an example of less being more as it is of less being just enough. Combine just the right size with attractive looks, sensible features, and a reasonable price tag, and you’ve got another TR Recommended award winner.

Comments closed
    • Questtt3
    • 6 years ago

    I have been trying to decide between the Corsair 350D and 450D case with most likely 1 GPU (maybe 2 in the future if flight sims, and video editing software ever work in SLI).

    However, after reading the temperature and noise testing reviews here for both cases, I have some serious concerns about heat issues (of the GPU especially) in the 350D case . . . especially in comparison to the 450D . . . are these concerns warranted? (Seems the “practical” noise levels are fairly close between the two cases, yes?).

    Which case would be a better 3 monitor case for flight simulators, HD video editing and heavy duty workstation?

    Thank you!

    • glenster
    • 6 years ago

    The NZXT Phantom 530 is good at quiet and cool, features and build quality,
    at this price range, too. (You can fit a rad or two into it, too, if you want.)

    • Freon
    • 6 years ago

    How thick of a 120×240 radiator fits on top?

    I had to split the fans and radiator in my old CM 690, and the top cover doesn’t *quite* close over my radiator. Haven’t decided to spend the money to fix it by buying a new case yet, but I’ve had my eye out. Was actually looking at the AIR 540 cube, but would rather have a tower.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 6 years ago

    This case makes sense. All of Corsair’s other cases are enormous (even the 350D, for mATX builds, is very large) or on the other end like the Carbide 200R or 300R look kind of cramped to work in and don’t have the build quality of the Obsidian series. This is a nice middle ground at a good price, a fair amount smaller than my Fractal Design Define R4.

    • dashbarron
    • 6 years ago

    Geoff, the feeling I get with this case is that it’s good but with a few less-than-perfect quirks. I was excited to read it but there were little things you pointed out along the way which seem to detract from it’s overall quality. Kind of the feeling you seem to be putting there, which is well received here.

    • bfar
    • 6 years ago

    The 165mm CPU cooler clearance could be an issue with big air coolers

    Anyone know if a Noctua D14 will fit in this? It would be a home run for me if it did. Noctua’s spec claims the cooler is 160mm (with fans). Not much room for error there!

    • tootercomputer
    • 6 years ago

    This looks like an excellent case with all the desired features most of us would want at a terrific price point. I worry that self-builders are a dying breed and that equipment options are going to become more and more limited. So it’s nice to see that hardware development sensitive to the home builder’s pocketbook continues. For example, I love the bottom of the case, that it is mesh and not solid. Great for air flow. If I was starting a new build, this case would be on my list.

    • superjawes
    • 6 years ago

    + Accepts “full” ATX boards (instead of mATX) without wasting a lot of space.
    + I like the location for SSDs. It might not make complete sense in a full sized case like this, but if it ends up working out, it could lead to more compact designs for smaller cases.
    + Continues the Obsidian tradition of easy building.

    – The recessed optical bays hurts the aestetic of the case. I like how Obsidian cases look, and it would be nice if I could have an optical drive without changing how it looks.
    – Sounds like this case doesn’t do much to quiet system noise, which is one of the complaints from my 650D. This isn’t a huge issue, but it’s something to keep in mind.

    • superjawes
    • 6 years ago

    [quote<]Since it also accepts ATX [b<]cases[/b<], the 750D is probably the more appropriate reference point.[/quote<] This case accepts ATX [i<]cases[/i<]?!? (Yo dawg, I heard you like cases...) I assume you meant "boards" 😉

    • drfish
    • 6 years ago

    Would the dust filter on the top fit the 350D?

      • tanker27
      • 6 years ago

      That’s my question. I wish the 350 came with one it sure is a nice perk. I wonder if you can buy it separately?

      Edit: looked on their site and it wasn’t listed as an accessory

      • Dissonance
      • 6 years ago

      I don’t have the 350D in the lab, but the 450D’s top dust filter measures ~157 x 384 mm. Hope that helps.

        • tanker27
        • 6 years ago

        Thanks I’ll measure when I get home!

      • tanker27
      • 6 years ago

      The 350D top is 152.4 mm X 292.1 mm

        • drfish
        • 6 years ago

        Check it: [url<]http://www.demcifilter.com/p0423/Corsair-Obsidian-350D-Dust-Filter-Kit.aspx[/url<]

          • tanker27
          • 6 years ago

          That’s great thanks drfish.

    • rpjkw11
    • 6 years ago

    Overall, a well designed, nice looking case at a decent price. EXCEPT for the bottom filter! Having to tip the case in order to r&r the magnetic filter brings visions that are too horrible to describe. To me, Corsair, that is a huge deal breaker. As for the rest, I’m favorably impressed.

    Bottom line: I could never consider the 450D as a replacement for my Enthoo Primo.

    • Ryhadar
    • 6 years ago

    I’m wondering how quiet the case would be if you moved at least one of the front fans into the case instead? Instead of inside the front panel, I mean. There looks like there’s plenty of room in this picture: [url<]https://techreport.com/r.x/corsair-450d/full-left.jpg[/url<] There's a lot of great things going on with this case. In fact, if not for a few flaws I see personally I'd even trade my mATX case up for this (and I do love me some mATX). Biggest con in my book is the giant, grilled opening on the top panel. Not only will it let all that noise out of the top but if you get any liquids spilled on top of the case it's game over. I know a lot of people feel strongly the opposite, but a lot of case manufacturers nowadays are supplying a separate plastic cover to at least combat the noise (which Corsair does on the 550D). I'd love to see Corsair do the same with this. Speaking of grills, the front panel is worse in my opinion for not being closed off like the previous panels. However, a lot of people were asking for a more open front. Additionally, you can buy parts from Corsair's website and I'm wondering if the 750D's front door (without holes) would fit in the 450D? At any rate, this looks like a fantastic mid tower otherwise. Especially with the magnetic filter on the bottom. I've always wondered why case manufacturers bothered to put a filter on the bottom and have it slide out from the back of the case. There's usually no room. The ability to slide out the filter from the sides is much more sensical. Also, more tower cases need a fan positioned at the bottom pointing up. I love that idea.

      • Dissonance
      • 6 years ago

      The 750D’s front panel won’t fit. It’s wider and taller than the 450D’s front panel.

        • September
        • 6 years ago

        I think Ryhadar is really on to something here – Corsair has a golden opportunity to provide case accessories to Obsidian owners who want to switch their front panel from solid to perf, or put different kinds of solid, mesh or high-flow filters on the top panel, or different kinds of side panels: solid, vented with fan attachments or windowed.

        But they really need to address how these parts can just slide out or pop-off so easily, there should be some more secure latch or screw options to keep some of these filters and doors more secure. Heck, my 350D front door didn’t even stay closed during shipping and both of the clips on the case side were broken – that shouldn’t happen – the door pegs should fail before the case-side attachment so if they are broken you can just order a new door, and pick between several options to boot.

        I for one would like a mesh top option for the 350D grill, maybe they could find something that could even resist spills yet have moderate air flow? I understand it is shipped bare to save costs, but give me the option to buy it online from Corsair. Having a nice filter like the 450D has for the top would be a good option as well as another option like a solid yet flexible rubber mat that could come in 350/450/750 sizes.

        Also having a 350D type door available for the 450D and vice-verse seems to be low hanging fruit for a manufacturer like Corsair. You already make these things, just make more sizes of each.

        I’d also like to be able to screw in the bottom filters on all of these cases so they aren’t a problem when handling the case. How often do you clean the filter? I usually have positive air pressure from the top and front intakes and mount the PSU fan pointed internally (the Corsair HX fans won’t even run due to the case airflow) so the bottom is really pointless to me. Maybe I’ll just take it out.

      • tanker27
      • 6 years ago

      Noise, what noise? Even if you dont have a radiator to put in the top there should not be anymore noise coming from the case than a normal hum nowadays unless you use some older high volume case fans. Newer case fans are quiet and well built.

      • Aerugo
      • 6 years ago
        • HisDivineOrder
        • 6 years ago

        I wonder who at Corsair actually thought a bottom dust panel that slid out the back was ever a good idea. It’s the one real, annoying thing about my 550D that I can actually point at and say, “WTF?”

        Did they even TRY using it as a real case before they shipped them?

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 6 years ago

    Eh. Okay.

    So where’s the cube-based Obsidian, Corsair? 😉

      • atari030
      • 6 years ago

      I really like this one….not your speed or just not high end enough?

      [url<]http://www.corsair.com/en-ca/carbide-series-air-540-high-airflow-atx-cube-case[/url<]

        • derFunkenstein
        • 6 years ago

        That’s a big frickin’ cube. I assumed he meant an mITX cube.

          • atari030
          • 6 years ago

          Ah, my mistake. I still like the big frickin’ cube though. 🙂

          • slowriot
          • 6 years ago

          I think he meant a Obsidian series cube case. An Air 540 with a better designed second chamber would be an interesting case. As is the Air 540 has a lot of good but also a lot missing.

            • HisDivineOrder
            • 6 years ago

            He–he being me–did indeed mean a genuine Obsidian series cube case for exactly the reasons you state.

            The Air 540 is a nice/okay first effort, but they could really expand on the idea with a premium-line case. Especially if they go silence-“capable” like they did with the 550D.

            • September
            • 6 years ago

            Are you looking for this (250D): [url<]http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811139033[/url<] It's a mITX cube in the Obsidian series and is 13.8" x 10.9" x 11.4" which may be considered kind of large as well but I think would look great on a desk. At 28L it's certainly smaller than the 350D/450D.

    • f0d
    • 6 years ago

    im a watercooling enthusiast and even i dont see the point of having holes in the case for external watercooling

    i rarely see anyone with external watercooling anymore – does anyone here have external watercooling?

      • Terra_Nocuus
      • 6 years ago

      I’ve seen a couple pictures of builds where a USB/Firewire/etc cable was run through one of those openings from a PCI/e card to connect to a 5.25″ bay insert. But it’s rare, I think.

    • MEATLOAF2
    • 6 years ago

    I like this case, I think I’ll pick it up and move the guts of my current rig into it. I’ve been looking for a decent case and wanted a nice premium feel and good cooling, as well as being easy to build in. I just won’t be able to tolerate a flashy case with lights and whatnot, I love the understated and overall classy feel of this, it looks professional outside of the window.

    It’s a hard choice between this and the 750D but I will never have a need for the extra space and the lower price really tickles my fancy, considering this has pretty much the same amenities, at least the same that I will be able to make use of.

    I only have a single 1TB HDD and a DVD drive, so I’m thinking that I’ll just put the HDD in the 5.25″ bay with an adapter, and pull the 3.5″ drive bays out entirely and save them for later. Seems like it would have great airflow if I did that, along with 2 120mm intake fans at the bottom (the 750D doesn’t have a dust filter across the entire bottom, just the PSU), and 2 120mm exhaust at the top. I have the spare fans already. That would be 4 intake and 3 exhaust total, probably overkill though.

    It’s too bad there isn’t an option for a windowless or possibly a fan mountable side vent version. Windows on cases feel/look cheap to me. I much prefer a strong steel sheet protecting my components to a probably cheap piece of plastic. Although I won’t complain, it looks to be a great case.

    Great review by the way.

    EDIT: Regarding the 3.5″ HDD in the 5.25″ bay, does anyone have any input on the extra heat the drive will have to deal with? I’ve always had my drive/s in the drive cage with direct airflow..

    • James296
    • 6 years ago

    now this is just bugging me.

    When a review states how long a radiator you can fit in the top/front/bottom but hardly ever states how thick of a radiator you can fit. the reason being is not all radiators are the same thickness i.e. Corsair H100i vs H105 or one of the many aftermarket radiators you can get.

      • superjawes
      • 6 years ago

      That would be something nice to include, but I have to imagine that Corsair radiators would fit in a Corsair case…that’s a big design flaw if they can’t.

        • James296
        • 6 years ago

        you’d be surprised at how often it happens, through it happens much less nowadays. however, with the measurements Dissonance gave, unless you move it closer to the door panel, you’re not going to be able to fit a H105, with fans, inside

      • Freon
      • 6 years ago

      Yeah I’d love to know how much total thickness would work before encroaching on the motherboard space. And offset might matter (where it mounts with regards to side-to-side offset).

      • f0d
      • 6 years ago

      this also bugs me
      reviews rarely say how big of a radiator can fit
      (which is why i love my 900D which can take my 60mm rad and 38mm fans 🙂

      • Dissonance
      • 6 years ago

      Good suggestion, so I took a few additional measurements.

      58 mm from the top panel to the top of the mobo tray.
      29 mm of clearance in the front panel, plus another 15 mm of headroom in the pop-out front cover.

        • James296
        • 6 years ago

        thank you for the info 🙂

        • f0d
        • 6 years ago

        yes thanks for that
        hopefully you can do it for all future reviews also 🙂

    • JustAnEngineer
    • 6 years ago

    At 52 liters, the Obsidian 450D does seem like a more reasonable design than the over-sized behemoths in the rest of the Corsair Obsidian line (550D = 58 L, 650D = 65 L, 750D = 72 L, 900D = 113 L).

    The Corsair Carbide series 200R from the Econobox is 45 liters.
    The Antec Sonata Solo II is 42½ liters.
    The cheap Rosewill LINE Glow is only 33.7 liters.

      • Ryhadar
      • 6 years ago

      Kind of nullifies the 350D, in my opinion too. It’s not [i<]that[/i<] much bigger and you get a lot more options.

        • Terra_Nocuus
        • 6 years ago

        I saw the 350D at Microcenter on monday, I was shocked at how [i<]big[/i<] it was.

        • flip-mode
        • 6 years ago

        The 350D was nullified from birth.

          • HisDivineOrder
          • 6 years ago

          Many companies seem unable to grasp the reason mITX and/or mATX exist.

      • End User
      • 6 years ago

      Dimensionally the 200R/450D/550D/650D are in the same ballpark.

      My 700D is a beast but I really don’t see it being any more of an space issue than my 550D. Buying the smaller 200R would change nothing for me.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 6 years ago

    Curious on the comparison to the 750D instead of the 550D or 650D. Is it because of the price segment this falls into?

    Oh and nice review, love the toggle images.

      • Dissonance
      • 6 years ago

      I don’t have the 550D on hand, and the 650D is a little long in the tooth. The 750D seemed like the most appropriate alternative from Corsair’s current lineup.

        • JosiahBradley
        • 6 years ago

        Understood. I was asking because I had just built a system with the 550D about 10 months ago and found it a pleasure to work with. Thanks for the clarification.

    • entropy13
    • 6 years ago

    Nice, now that’s a good Corsair case choice without getting much bigger than other typical cases…shame there would of course be a 2 months delay (or so) before it arrives here.

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