Corsair’s Vengeance K70 keyboard reviewed

Corsair’s original Vengeance K60 keyboard is one of the most frustrating products I’ve ever encountered. On one hand, it’s brilliant. The K60 combines Cherry MX mechanical switches with sensible extras, sturdy build quality, and a stunning industrial design. But it doesn’t use MX switches throughout. The function row and paging block are backed by the sort of rubber-dome switches most folks are trying to avoid when purchasing, you know, mechanical keyboards.

The semi-mechanical approach might have worked in an accountant’s spreadsheet—rubber domes are much cheaper than premium Cherry switches—but it completely ruined the K60 for me. Every so often while using the thing, I’d have to hit one of those cheaper switches. Their vague, mushy feedback paled in comparison to the smooth, precise response of the Cherry MX units, serving as a painful reminder that the K60 just wasn’t as good as it should have been.

Fortunately, the Vengeance K70 is much better. This second effort has Cherry MX switches throughout, rectifying its predecessor’s fatal flaw. All the highlights of the original remain, and Corsair has added programmable backlighting and a blacked-out color scheme. Those changes transform the K70 into more than just a fully mechanical version of the K60. Simply put, I think the K70 is the best keyboard around.

Mechanical keyboards are everywhere these days, but the K70 easily stands out in the crowd. I mean, just look at the thing. They keys are laid out on a single sheet of brushed aluminum that’s anodized to match the stealthy aesthetic. There’s no top plate, which makes the caps appear to float above the surface of the tray.

This beautiful form is functional, too. On all the mechanical keyboards I’ve used, dust and crumbs can easily slip between the keys and accumulate in the tray below. Since the K70’s tray is exposed, clearing the build-up requires little more than blowing down on the tops of the keys, which shoots the particulate out the top and sides of the board. My lungs aren’t powerful enough to blast out all the dust, but shots of compressed air should be more effective. Obsessive-compulsive types can also remove the caps for more thorough scrubbing. (A key puller is included in the box.)

The K70 feels every bit as beefy as its metal foundation looks. Keystrokes bottom out with satisfying sharpness, and there’s no hint of flex or creakiness in the frame. It really does feel like you’re typing on a solid aluminum slab.

All the key caps sit atop Cherry MX mechanical switches, and the overall feel is consistent across the board. Our sample is equipped MX red switches that have a light response and a completely linear stroke. Corsair also makes a K70 variant with MX brown switches, which offer a tactile “bump” at the actuation point, and one with MX blue switches, which combine tactile feedback with stiffer springs and an audible click.

Linear switches are prized by gamers who need to repeat keystrokes in rapid succession, while tactile ones are better suited to more conventional typists. Switch preferences tend to be personal, though. I recommend trying a few different options before picking your favorite color. The MX blues are relatively loud, which is something to keep in mind if you have roommates, co-workers, or significant others in close proximity. More details on the main MX switch types are available in Cyril’s Rosewill RK-9000 round-up.

The K70 sticks to the standard U.S. layout, so the keys are all the right shapes and in the right places. On top of the usual selection, you also get a handful of volume and media controls, including a knurled metal volume roller that’s especially slick. I’m not as enthusiastic about the extra buttons, whose response is on the limp, mushy side, but I suppose that’s OK for auxiliary controls.

A second cluster of additional buttons sits to the left of the media corner. One of these buttons disables the Windows key, while the others control the programmable backlighting.


The backlighting can be set to one of three brightness levels, or it can be disabled completely. There are also full and partial lighting profiles. The full profile activates all the LEDs, while the partial one can be customized on a per-key basis. Programming the backlight is incredibly simple: just hold the profile-selection button to enter the customization mode, toggle the individual backlights by tapping the associated keys, and then hold the button again to save the configuration.

There’s also a “reactive” backlight mode that illuminates keys as they’re pressed. The LEDs only light up momentarily, and the effect is kind of cool, but it’s hard to picture a practical application outside of “hey, check this out” demos. I dunno, maybe helpless hunt-and-peck types who stare at their keyboards compulsively will appreciate visual confirmation of successful keystrokes.

The K70’s open design has interesting implications for the backlighting, which reflects off the metal base to create a glowing ground effect that wouldn’t look out of place in a street race. I like how the glow highlights the subtle texture of the brushed aluminum even in a darkened room.

Corsair is prepping a version of the K70 with multi-colored RGB lighting that can replicate millions of different hues, complete with complex animation effects. Those RGB switches are supposed to light the key cap more evenly, which brings me to the K70’s only real visual quirk. Because it uses conventional backlighting, which places an LED on the north edge of each switch, the characters are brighter at the north end of the cap than they are down south. The difference is noticeable, though it’s limited to keys with secondary functions. We’ve observed similarly uneven illumination on other backlit keyboards, so the K70 isn’t alone in this regard.

As one might expect from a gaming-focused product, the K70 supports n-key rollover and wicked-fast polling rates. The keyboard is set to update at 1000Hz by default, and there’s a switch on the edge to dial things back. Some motherboard firmware apparently can’t keep up with faster polling rates.

The K70 connects via a 6.5′ USB cable wrapped in a thick, braided housing. There are two plugs at the other end: one for the keyboard and another to feed the integrated USB port. The extra port is handy for thumb drives, but don’t expect SuperSpeed transfer rates. I did a quick transfer test with a USB 3.0 SSD, which managed 160MB/s when connected directly to the system but only 33MB/s via the pass-through port.

Flipping the K70 reveals two sets of adjustable feet. The keyboard can be tilted toward the user, away, or propped up evenly on all fours. With its feet folded flat, the K70 has roughly the same height and slope as the other mechanical keyboards we’ve encountered.

Additional support is provided by the included wrist wrest. This plastic piece snaps onto the front edge of the keyboard, and it’s covered with a soft-touch finish that feels quite nice. Unfortunately, the rest bows up in the middle slightly, causing it to sag just a smidgen under the weight of my right wrist. We’ve noticed similar bowing on the wrist rests included with some other mechanical keyboards, so again, the quirk isn’t unique to the K70.

The final items in the box are textured caps for the WASD and 1-6 keys. Since several of the caps have raised edges, they’re not ideal for everyday typing. It doesn’t take long to swap them in for gaming sessions, though.

The K70 is relatively straightforward, so that’s it. There are no dedicated macro keys to discuss, no accompanying apps to explore, and no integrated LCDs to watch. No cup holder, either. But the K70 doesn’t need all that, because Corsair has done an excellent job of implementing the essentials.

Premium experiences don’t come cheap, and neither does the K70. That said, the $129.99 asking price seems reasonable given the build quality, features, and overall feel. You can certainly pay less for a mechanical keyboard, but you’ll be getting something lesser in return.

Corsair Vengeance K70

June 2014

After weeks of using our MX red review sample as my daily driver, I’ve been itching to get back to tactile switches. I even have a few appropriate candidates floating around the lab. The thing is, they all feel like a step down from the level of luxury to which I’ve apparently grown accustomed. They’re not as easy to clean, their backlighting isn’t as configurable, and their industrial designs aren’t in the same league.

The Vengeance K70 made me even more of a keyboard snob, and now, nothing else will do. So I ordered the MX brown version for myself. Both deservedly and by definition, the K70 is a TR Editor’s Choice.

Comments closed
    • burntham77
    • 5 years ago

    I bought the Cherry MX Red version of the K70, and it was comfortable and attractive, but it was too loud. Mind you, I was alone when I used it, so it wasn’t like anyone else complained about the noise. I was annoying myself with my typing. The review mentions the Red version being one of the quieter versions of this model, but it was certainly not quiet. Sadly, the benefits of the keyboard were not enough to make up for the noise. Mind you, I was using this on a gaming machine, so I was mainly using the WASD keys and a few nearby keys. I can’t even imagining using that thing for regular typing.

      • just brew it!
      • 5 years ago

      Cherry-based keyboards really should come with o-rings pre-installed to cushion the impact of bottoming out. This reduces the noise level substantially, and (IMO) also reduces typing fatigue, without affecting the tactile feedback (for the switch variants that have it).

    • Welch
    • 5 years ago

    I loved the idea of the K60 and it killed me when I found out they released it with the F Keys (and gaming keys on the K90) not being mechanical. So the K70 has been my “dream” keyboard ever since.

    My wife knocked over a bottle of beer on my old original Logitech G15. I thought it was done, so I unplugged it and looked to salvage it. After opening it I was extremely surprised at the high quality materials the keyboard was made of. I cleaned out everything and proceeded to put it back together. A good thing too since the last time I cleaned it was nearly 2 years ago. After putting it together and it worked I was happy and at the same time sad. Had it gone out I would have given myself a good excuse to buy a K70 or K95.

    • Canageek
    • 5 years ago

    Are there any good non-mechanical keyboards coming out these days? I don’t like the force needed to type on one, and can’t stand the noise mechanical keyboards make. My Microsoft Natural Ergonomic Keyboard 4000 v1.0 isn’t silent, but damn, I hate trying to watch a Let’s Play or livestream where they are using a mechanical keyboard (taptaptaptapatpatpaptaposdfgrahhhhhhhhhh).

    Also: What ever happened to curved keyboards, raised wrist-rests and cushioning? I know my set up isn’t ideal for gaming (Shift, caps lock and tab are too far away– I should switch to EDSF), but damn, some elements of it could be stolen, couldn’t they?

      • SS4
      • 5 years ago

      Red switches requires less actuation force than a dome keyboard so i don’t get how you feel its harder to press them when its actually the opposite . . .
      Also the main reason mechanical switches are noisy is because ppl bottom out the keys, you actually need to press it only 2 mm for it to register so banging it at the bottom is useless. You could actually type with less travel and less force needed on a mechanical keyboard thus making less noise and causing less fatigue than dome keyboards. You can also get little rubber O ring that can be put under the keys to reduce the noise from keys bottoming out and also maximum travel distance of the key again reducing the fatigue while typing even when bottoming out.

      • slowriot
      • 5 years ago

      As SS4 pointed out, you want Cherry MX Red switches and to install rubber o-rings to the keys. This will eliminate much of the clattering noise. I’d even go so far as to say my current keyboards (which has Red switches and o-rings installed) are quieter than my old Microsoft rubber dome keyboards.

      Red switches are great, they’re the only mechanical switches I’d recommend personally. The others all require too much actuation force (or have the, in my opinion, highly annoying clicking mechanism), creating undue stress for your fingers. For me this is a big deal as I constantly type as part of my job and many of my hobbies.

        • MadManOriginal
        • 5 years ago

        The only common switches that are inherently noisy are Blues (others that are noted with audible feedback like Greens (I think) too, but those others are rare). All the noise otherwise is from bottoming out, or from keycap wiggling and is therefore no worse than membrane keyboards. Otherwise if one doesn’t like the clickyness of blues, it’s down to personal preference. I have only tried Reds briefly but I like the feeling of Browns because I am heavy-handed in general and am more likely to bottom out keys which have no feedback, but with Browns I can type easier despite the heavier actuation because I am more likely to stop after activation.

          • lem18
          • 5 years ago

          Agreed. Reds are very easy to press (easier than all membrane/rubber dome keyboards I’ve used). In fact, I choose browns because of this reason. I like to rest my left hand on the keyboard, and I find making typos on reds is easier because there’s no resistance to a lazy hand. When typing, I don’t notice the bump in the browns, which still feel much easier to press than membrane keys.

    • Brainsan
    • 5 years ago

    I just happened to get one of these last week. So far I like it, but I’ve got two questions:

    How do you enable the reactive backlight mode? I’m only able to get the full and partial modes.

    What does the “1 2 4 8 BIOS” switch do?

    Neither one seems to be documented.

    Thanks.

      • pwolf
      • 5 years ago

      I believe the BIOS switch is for compatibility with older BIOS’s. If the keyboard does not respond when you are in BIOS you should try a different setting.

    • HisDivineOrder
    • 5 years ago

    Looking forward to the RGB version.

    That said, I have to wonder if “typing on an aluminum slab” wouldn’t turn typing into an echo chamber.

    Also, the frequent talk of failed backlighting across the intarwebz (anecdotally of course) seems disconcerting.

      • just brew it!
      • 5 years ago

      [quote<]That said, I have to wonder if "typing on an aluminum slab" wouldn't turn typing into an echo chamber.[/quote<] Most Cherry-based keyboards have a metal plate in them, normally it is covered up by the outer casing. And yes, it is a bit on the loud side, even louder than the click of the Cherry blue switches at their actuation point. This is one of the reasons I prefer to install rubber o-rings under the keycaps. (The other reason being that I believe it reduces typing fatigue by cushioning the bottom of the stroke when you bottom out.)

      • SS4
      • 5 years ago

      The RGB version backlighting will last much longer since the LED are inside the switches so they are protected against static which seems to be the most common reason why LED fail.

    • Ph.D
    • 5 years ago

    It’s a damn shame they did not give the K95 the same treatment.
    If they made a full mechanical keyboard with MX Brown switches and macro keys I would be all over it.
    Only being able to get them with MX Red switches makes no sense.

      • Sabresiberian
      • 5 years ago

      I agree, I think a variety of switches should be available for all mechanical keyboards.

      Unfortunately they may not sell enough K95s to make the investment in varieties with other switches. Personally I’m fine with the reds and like them much better than even good dome keys for typing (as in the Logitech G15), but others are more “mechanical switch aware” than I am, and have tried and like different switches better.

      It would at least be a nice goodwill gesture to their customers, and, in my opinion, a worthwhile investment simply because it will make more people Corsair fans. If you are thrilled with their keyboard, next time you buy a PSU, mouse, memory, SSD, you may well look at Corsair first. 🙂

    • itachi
    • 5 years ago

    Just one thing I want to mention, that I love on my G11 is the little plastic pad to have your palm sit on, if you see what I mean.. and also the programmable macro keys are always a plus, not a big user of them but still.

    Also yea I heard mecanical keyboard does alot of noise, so I rather have it as quiet as possible so if the rubber things were just here to prevent noise and wouldn’t obstruct for the reactivity, that would be perfect to me !

    • burntham77
    • 5 years ago

    While I am hesitant to spend more than $100 on a keyboard, this one makes a case for spending a little extra. I like that is has a dedicated volume control, since I use an MSI all-in-one PC, and the volume controls are annoying to reach.

    I like that this keyboard does not have macro keys on the left side that get in the way of natural typing. I like the full-sized layout far more than the cramped layout of the keyboard that was included with my PC.

    I think the Brown MX version will be a solid option, since those keys are reasonably quiet for a mechanical keyboard. The backlighting a nice touch, and should match the red parts on my PC.

    Thank you for the review.

    • rahulahl
    • 5 years ago

    I ordered mine with Cherry Brown switches on the weekend. I should be getting it tomorrow hopefully.
    Main reason I picked it was that it looks solid and its easy to get dog hair out of the keyboard since the keys are raised. And also the volume roller reminded me of my old Logitech G110.

    Its good to know that my purchase has already got a good review on techreport. It sort of validates my choice. 🙂

    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 5 years ago

    Corsair has been really lax in offering other MX designs. I mean it took a year to get Blues on there. I passed over the initial iteration because of that and to replace the mech I bought (razor black widow ultimate) I want MX greens (the stiffest, loudest of them all!) I had considered grabbing the blues and dropping the O-rings on em ( I hate the bottom out clank) but at the premium I’m inclined to wait… am I being to particular? I know there are other Green keyboards out there but this is the design I want.

    • Peldor
    • 5 years ago

    Look I’m not OCD or anything, but whoever thought 134526 was the best arrangement for that photo of the key caps needs to be hauled out back and shot.

      • Chrispy_
      • 5 years ago

      [url=http://www.reactionface.info/sites/default/files/images/1287666826226.png<]I wholeheartedly agree[/url<].

      • Duck
      • 5 years ago

      I spent way too long staring at it. Probably for over a minute. I was trying to make sense of the pattern like I was missing something. Who would do this cruel and unusual thing? My faith in humanity took a knock today.

    • anotherengineer
    • 5 years ago

    Nice.

    But

    Still waiting for a review of this guy with the clears

    [url<]http://www.wasdkeyboards.com/index.php/products/code-keyboard.html[/url<] Make it happen TR!!

    • Anovoca
    • 5 years ago

    Am I the only one put off by the floating key look? Keyboards don’t have much in the way of aesthetics to begin with and to me the uncovered gap between key and board just looks lazy in design.

      • spugm1r3
      • 5 years ago

      The short answer: yes. The floating key design makes the keyboard a breeze to clean. In person, it gives the keyboard a very clean design. The difference is equivalent to seeing a Saturn in one driveway and a Lexus in the next. It doesn’t matter if the house is identical in size and quality, or that the Lexus doesn’t do anything extra. Sometimes aesthetics ARE important.

      • just brew it!
      • 5 years ago

      It may not be just you, but I definitely like the minimalist aesthetic. Also, as already noted, it makes cleaning out the ‘board chow much easier so there’s a practical aspect as well.

      • internetsandman
      • 5 years ago

      Even if I didn’t take into account the ease of cleaning and the solid aluminum slab and matching color scheme, I’ve always loved this design. I bought a mechanical keyboard that doesn’t have floating keys and I’ve longed for a design like this ever since. My only wish is that they would make one without the keypad (the page block can go as well) to get this kind if design in a more compact footprint. I would buy it in a heartbeat

        • MadManOriginal
        • 5 years ago

        Yeah…they need to make the K65 with switches other than MX Red. I would seriously consider a Brown switch version even though I have two Rosewill 104-key mechanicals already…the Corsair design is just sexy.

      • kamikaziechameleon
      • 5 years ago

      I actually love the look, have since I saw it. If you clean your keyboard regularly (I do ) this just makes too much sense.

    • lem18
    • 5 years ago

    Has anyone tested this keyboard with Linux? The K60 has issues with Linux (Google for K60 Linux pipe), as does the Gigabyte Osmium (which I have). Here’s the test: Boot a Linux distro, such as Ubuntu 14.04, then open gedit, a terminal, or something else that allows keyboard input.

    Hold down the backslash/pipe key, and observe whether it repeats or not. Then, while holding it down, press other keys, and see what happens. Here’s what the Gigabyte Osmium does under Ubuntu 13.10 and 14.04:
    Holding \ down, no other keys pressed: \ (note, no repeating)
    Holding \ down, and pressing the r key at 1 second intervals: \r\\\r\\\r\\\r\\\r\\\r\\\r\\\r\\\
    Holding \ down, and pressing shift at 1 second intervals: \|\\|\\|\\|\\|\\|\\|\\|\\

    The K60 does the same apparently, perhaps similar chipset? There appears to be issues with n-key rollover over USB and Linux. Also of note, the Osmium’s Num/Caps/Scroll Lock status LEDs don’t change state, but the keyboard state does change (i.e. caps will be produced with caps lock, but the caps lock LED wont be lit).

      • esc_in_ks
      • 5 years ago

      I believe what you’ve written above is just the test to determine if your keyboard is susceptible to the problem. But, to be clear for everyone else out there, the problem is much worse.

      The real problem, as I see it, is that pressing shift + \ (to type a pipe character) results in pipe + backslash + backslash (|\\) being what’s actually typed. That pretty much makes the keyboard unusable in Linux. And, I’m guessing that the only thing that will fix that is a kernel update to take into account this ridiculous hack.

      I’m guessing this is Corsair not 100% supporting USB HID correctly, most likely to do with some n-key rollover nonsense.

        • just brew it!
        • 5 years ago

        That was my thought as well — they’re doing something odd to handle the n-key rollover on USB. They have to be doing something strange pretty much by definition, since USB HID officially supports only 6-key rollover + modifiers. Maybe the keyboard is appearing to the system as two logical keyboards. Watching /var/log/syslog while the keyboard is being plugged/unplugged would likely yield some clues here.

        (Not sure why you guys are getting downvoted for this sub-thread, there’s no reason for you to be making this stuff up and it seems like a legitimate concern!)

          • localhostrulez
          • 5 years ago

          I own one of these and will confirm – yes, it appears as 2 keyboards in Windows.

            • just brew it!
            • 5 years ago

            Interesting. I’ll bet that’s one piece of the puzzle.

            There’s more to it than that though. I can also confirm that hooking two physical keyboards up to a Linux system, and using the Shift key on the first keyboard while pressing other keys on the second keyboard, appears to work just fine.

        • lem18
        • 5 years ago

        Yep, the shift-\ (to get pipe) was annoying when it produced |\\ .. the trick was actually to release the \ key *before* the shift key. Obviously that’s not what most people do (including me), so when we use these keyboards under Linux, we get |\\. (for the non-Linux users, | is used regularly in Linux to pipe the output from one shell command to another, in case you were wondering why | is such an issue)

        Here’s something interesting:

        The Deck Hassium (non-Pro) allows the user to switch between 6-key rollover (6KRO; default) and n-key rollover (NKRO) by pressing a key on the keyboard itself. In 6KRO mode, the pipe key works as expected. In NKRO mode, while it doesn’t produce |\\, the backslash key does *not* repeat (just like the Gigabyte Osmium and the Corsair K60), and generates extra events as other keys are pressed and released while \ is still held down.

        The Gigabyte Osmium presented itself as three USB devices to the host. The Deck Hassium as two. The main reason why I bought the Hassium is because of the ability to switch between 6KRO and NKRO on the fly (btw, when switching, the keyboard disconnects, then reconnects itself to the host).

    • mark84
    • 5 years ago

    A word of caution. Some of these boards back lighting can fail big time!

    A friend and myself bought one each. Both blue back lit, silver steel versions, I got brown switches he got blue.

    Over half the keys on my board back lighting has failed and no longer working. Night time typing is now a patchwork of lit up keys. My friends board has had no back light failures.

    I’ve in no way abused the board, I always take care of my gear and don’t mistreat it. Oddly the back lighting seemed to fail between system power cycles, turn off PC then next day turn on and 1 or two keys stop lighting up.

    Some quick googling suggests it’s not uncommon for these boards.

    Having said that, it is a great board to use, the volume roller was a big sell point above other mechanical options.

    When the Corsair RGB mechanical board comes out I’ll switch (pun!) to that, with the LEDs built into the switches and not tacked on like the K70 the reliability and build quality for the LEDs should be better.

      • timesupuk0ed
      • 5 years ago

      Yeah suddenly after 8 months one key failed (the period key on the num pad), and the next day I lost 4 additional keys (numbers 5-9). Otherwise though I love the keyboard, I had tried RAZERS ultimate 2013 edition and it felt very plasticky and poorly built. All the other keyboards had too many macro keys and since I don’t game much they used to piss me off as I’d sometimes hit them. Honestly the only flaw is the lighting system. Everything else is above par compared to pretty much other keyboards.

      FYI: using this on a Mac mini currently and just wanted to let people know that the caps, num, and scroll lock do not light up their indicators under Mac OSX.

      • wrevilo
      • 5 years ago

      I have a blue backlit, silver version too, albeit with red switches. Over 25 under key lights have failed on mine. Corsair will be swapping it out for me.

      • Chrispy_
      • 5 years ago

      I’m waiting for a tenkeyless variant of this, probably the K75; The K65 isn’t backlit, unfortunately.

      Hopefully Corsair sort this out before then but I’ve always been rather fond of Corsair’s express RMA option when they ship you a replacement before you have to send the dud back.

      • EzioAs
      • 5 years ago

      This happens to me too. Over 30 LEDs failed. Apparently this is only common for the blue LEDs, not the red ones.

      However, as you said, this is a solid keyboard. The build quality is outstanding, it looks very beautiful and the dedicated media keys are one of the reasons I chose this over other mechanical keyboard. The dead LEDs are not that big deal for me but I could see how it would hurt others.

        • just brew it!
        • 5 years ago

        Sounds like maybe Corsair got a bad batch of blue LEDs…

          • oldog
          • 5 years ago

          I doubt it. The blue back lights on my QPAD keyboard have had about six LED failures in 11 months.

          I was able to purchase “replacement” LEDs on line. [url<]http://www.maxkeyboard.com/keyboard-parts/led-lights.html[/url<] I'm going to tear mine apart and solder in some new ones.

      • just brew it!
      • 5 years ago

      [quote<]Oddly the back lighting seemed to fail between system power cycles, turn off PC then next day turn on and 1 or two keys stop lighting up.[/quote<] Have you noticed whether there's a bright flash on power up? Maybe the PWM controller for the LEDs has a bug which causes it to initially apply too much power.

        • mark84
        • 5 years ago

        Can’t say I’ve ever seen them go brighter than normal on start up. It’s possible, but as far as I can tell, they just didn’t light up.

      • wierdo
      • 5 years ago

      What’s the warranty period like? I hope at least 5 years so you can replace yours.

      That’s just unacceptable quality for the money in my book.

      • oldog
      • 5 years ago

      Do you think it best just to leave the LEDs on all the time? Easily done with an external USB power supply.

      • zenbi
      • 5 years ago

      Ditto. My “v” key’s backlight just went out a few days ago on mine.

      • itachi
      • 5 years ago

      yea that’s a shame.. if they market the lightning so much they might aswell put premiums leds in there not some cheapass stuff that break after like 1 year or god knows

    • HercDriver
    • 5 years ago

    I finally received my K70 Brown after ordering in April! Apparently there was some sort of customs or manufacturing delay (cherry switch backorders?).

    Anyway, I was hoping for some tactile click, but the noise you hear in videos is the keys bottoming out. Not as “fun” as my now inoperative adult-beverage-soaked Blackwidow Ultimate with the blue switches, but I actually like the browns better for both typing and gaming.

    Selective backlighting is very cool; I can illuminate only the number and F keys that I lose track of on an unlit keyboard and set the rest to momentary illum. Great keyboard and it should last for years.

    The only thing I miss from the Blackwidow is the single macro key I used; an alt+F4 killswitch.

    • just brew it!
    • 5 years ago

    I’m generally not a big fan of extra media keys, but they seem to have managed to do it without increasing the footprint of the keyboard much. I like the integrated volume roller.

    If I was in the market for a new mechanical now I’d probably consider one of these; looks like they did a really nice job. Based on the review, the only thing I would change (aside from opting for MX blue switches instead of red) would be o-rings to soften the landing and reduce the noise at the bottom of the stroke. O-rings are an easy retrofit so that’s a pretty minor issue.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 5 years ago

      OTOH, I want media keys for switching tracks while I’m in a game. I prefer to listen to not game soundtrack stuff while I play generally. Being able to skip around the playlist would be nice. Unfortunately it was not an option on my CM QuickFire Pro.

        • slowriot
        • 5 years ago

        Uhhhhhh. The CM QuickFire Pro has media keys implemented on the F-keys. Hold the Fn key and press the appropriate F-key. It works perfectly on my CM QuickFire Rapid.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 5 years ago

          OH HELL sorry QuickFire XT.

          And, huh, the media keys are there too. I’m an idiot.

      • HercDriver
      • 5 years ago

      I agree with you on the media keys. Adjusting software volume is for the birds.

      Side note, the media keys appear noticeably dim and unevenly lit at all brightness settings, and they cannot be selectively un-illuminated.

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