AMD’s second-generation Ryzen CPUs revealed

The leaks have been flying hard and fast for weeks, but this morning, AMD is officially taking the wraps off its second-generation Ryzen CPUs. Four new chips have been waiting in the wings, and they’ll be available for pre-order around the world starting today. General availability for those chips will begin April 19.

Β  Cores/

threads

Base

clock

(GHz)

Boost

clock

(GHz)

Total

cache

TDP Stock

cooler

Suggested

price

Ryzen 7 2700X 8/16 3.7 4.3 20 MB 105 W Wraith Prism (LED) $329
Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 4.1 65 W Wraith Spire (LED) $299
Ryzen 5 2600X 6/12 3.6 4.2 19 MB 95 W Wraith Spire $229
Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 3.9 65 W Wraith Stealth $199

I’m itching to share lots more information about these CPUs, but the tidbits in the table above are all we can talk about today. Even so, we have a lot to discuss.

Β  Cores Threads Base clock Boost clock XFR TDP Suggested

price

(launch)

Ryzen 7 1800X 8 16 3.6 GHz 4.0 GHz 100 MHz 95 W $499
Ryzen 7 1700X 3.4 GHz 3.8 GHz 100 MHz 95 W $399
Ryzen 7 1700 3.0 GHz 3.7 GHz 50 MHz 65 W $329
Ryzen 5 1600X 6 12 3.6 GHz 4.0 GHz 100 MHz 95 W $249
Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 3.6 GHz 50 MHz 65 W $219

The first thing you’ll note regarding these second-generation Ryzen parts is that clocks are way up compared to their first-generation counterparts. The $329 Ryzen 7 2700X (also at Amazon) blasts out of the gate with a 4.3 GHz boost speed. That’s up 200 MHz over its predecessor if you take XFR behavior into account. You’ll also notice that the top-end chip now sports a 105-W TDP, up from 95 W on the Ryzen 7 1800X. Finally, it’s absorbed both the Ryzen 7 1700X and Ryzen 7 1800X’s roles in the first-generation Ryzen lineup. There are good reasons for all of this, but you’ll have to sit tight until April 19 to learn more.

The $299 Ryzen 7 2700 (also at Amazon) enjoys a whopping 400-MHz peak clock speed boost over the Ryzen 7 1700’s 3.7 GHz pre-XFR boost speed (or 350 MHz if you take XFR into account). Base speeds are also up on this 65-W part, to 3.2 GHz (from 3.0 GHz pre-XFR).

Meanwhile, the $229 Ryzen 5 2600X (also at Amazon) takes over the top spot for AMD’s six-core, 12-thread CPUs. It gets a 100-MHz peak clock speed boost over the Ryzen 5 1600X. Base clock speeds remain the same between generations. Finally, the $199 Ryzen 5 2600 (also at Amazon) gets a 300-MHz peak clock speed boost over its predecessor, and its base clock rises 200 MHz. These are all welcome improvements, to be certain.

The second thing you’ll notice about these chips is that prices are down compared to where the first-generation Ryzen family landed at launch. Even with AMD’s intervening price cuts, second-generation Ryzen CPUs are priced quite aggressively. The Ryzen 7 2700X lands for $20 less than the Ryzen 7 1800X’s current suggested price, and the Ryzen 7 2700 carries the same $299 suggested price tag that the Ryzen 7 1700 does right now. AMD’s new six-core parts take a $20 haircut over their predecessors’ launch stickers.

On top of lower suggested prices, AMD is making another major value push with this new family of CPUs. Unlike past Ryzen X-series CPUs, all second-generation Ryzen chips will now include CPU coolers in the box. The Ryzen 7 2700X gets AMD’s fanciest boxed cooler yet: the Wraith Prism. This RGB LED-bedecked cooler now has four direct-contact copper heat pipes running across its base, plus an addressable RGB LED ring and translucent fan with even more blinkenlights inside. The Ryzen 7 2700 will keep its predecessor’s RGB LED-illuminated Wraith Spire. The Ryzen 5 2600X will get a non-illuminated Wraith Spire, while the Ryzen 5 2600 will now come with the entry-level Wraith Stealth.

We can’t talk about performance numbers for second-gen Ryzen CPUs yet, but their prices alone seem poised to make sparks fly. Intel’s superb Core i7-8700K is $349 at e-tail right now. Even with its excellent performance in mind, the i7-8700K doesn’t include any form of stock heatsink, and enthusiasts have long griped about the difficulty of cooling the top-end Coffee Lake part thanks to Intel’s use of thermal paste under its heat spreader. The high-quality stock cooler and soldered heat spreader on the Ryzen 7 2700X might tip many enthusiasts in that chip’s favor.

In fact, all second-generation Ryzen CPUs will have the fully-unlocked multipliers and soldered heat spreaders that have become Ryzen hallmarks, and that’s serious red meat for enthusiasts. At $300, the Ryzen 7 2700 will face off against the locked, six-core, 12-thread Core i7-8700, whose boxed heatsink is a low-profile, all-aluminum unit that’s likely nowhere near as quiet or capable as the Wraith Spire. Down the line, the locked, six-core, six-thread Core i5-8600 will face off against the Ryzen 5 2600X at $229, while the locked, six-core, six-thread Core i5-8500 will contend with the Ryzen 5 2600 around $200.

On the whole, the higher thread counts, unlocked multipliers, soldered heat spreaders, and high-quality coolers boxed with second-generation Ryzen parts seem poised to continue delivering vigorous competion in today’s CPU market. We will doubtless see a couple situations where the wider SIMD units of Intel’s chips give them advantages in certain workloads, but the broad picture for AMD’s competitive position already seems quite favorable on a dollar-for-dollar basis.

Β 

A sneak peek at what we’re testing

I’m happy to report that we’ve had a pair of second-generation Ryzen CPUs in the TR labs for a couple of days now, and we can now pull back the curtain and show you just what we’re testing and how we’ve been testing it ahead of next week’s launch.

Here’s a look at the Ryzen 7 2700X and the Ryzen 5 2600X. From the outside, Ryzen second-gen chips (and their boxes) look practically identical to their predecessors. If you’re not paying attention to labels or model numbers, you’d be hard-pressed to tell anything had changed between first-gen and second-gen Ryzen parts.

AMD sent over a Wraith Prism for us to use with the Ryzen 7 2700X and a Wraith Spire to crown the Ryzen 5 2600X. We can’t plug these coolers in yet for the camera, so you’ll have to wait until next week to behold the Wraith Prism in all of its RGB LED glory.

We’ve also amassed a small fleet of X470 motherboards to play with alongside these second-generation Ryzen CPUs. I wrote about the Gigabyte X470 Aorus Gaming 7 Wifi when it was in stealth mode at CES, and I’m pleased to be using this board as our test bed for our second-gen Ryzen processors. The finned VRM heatsinks of the $240 X470 Aorus Gaming 7 Wifi match quite nicely with the Wraith Prism, and I expect they’ll help this board deliver top-notch performance as we push our chips to the limit. Stay tuned.

Asus’ $300 ROG Crosshair VII Hero (Wi-Fi) is another fine-looking X470 board, and like the X470 Aorus Gaming 7 above, it’s bursting with high-end features. An integrated I/O shield, onboard Wi-Fi, rear-panel BIOS Flashback and firmware-reset buttons, and handy voltage-monitoring points next to the 24-pin ATX power connector more than establish this mobo’s enthusiast bona fides. I’m eager to sink my teeth into the Crosshair VII Hero as soon as I can.

MSI’s $260 X470 Gaming M7 AC offers another high-end take on the X470 platform. Check out the massive heatsink that covers this board’s chipset and dual M.2 ports. Like the Gigabyte and Asus boards above, the X470 Gaming M7 offers integrated Wi-Fi and convenient rear-panel controls for BIOS flashing and CMOS resets. We don’t get an integrated I/O panel on this board, but that’s about all it’s missing in this company.

Last but not least, AMD sent along a kit of G.Skill’s Sniper X DDR4-3400 memory. This is the fastest memory kit that AMD has sent us for testing its Ryzen products so far. Make of that what you will.

All X470 motherboards will include access to an AMD storage-acceleration utility called StoreMI. Although the company isn’t sharing details of StoreMI just yet, the company’s page for the feature says that X370 motherboard owners can experience similar accelerative benefits with the Enmotus FuzeDrive utility that the red team first touted for its products at CES. Recall that Enmotus FuzeDrive gives builders a way to create an accelerated, tiered storage hierarchy on their system using everything from spinning hard drives to a portion of system RAM. If StoreMI works the same way as FuzeDrive, it may give the X470 platform an arrow in its quiver versus Intel’s Optane Memory and Rapid Storage Technology products. Heck, Enmotus FuzeDrive can even use one of those slices of 3D Xpoint to cache frequently-accessed data, and so might StoreMI.

Whew. That’s all we can talk about regarding second-gen Ryzen processors at the moment. Be sure to keep an eye on TR for our full review of these processors.

Comments closed
    • Knee Dragger
    • 2 years ago

    I have violent, explosive diarrhea.

    • HERETIC
    • 2 years ago

    Could this be the lady “2800”is waiting for-
    [url<]ttps://www.techpowerup.com/243380/intel-rumored-to-commemorate-40th-anniversary-of-the-8086-with-a-special-core-i7-sku[/url<]

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      Ah er, 2886? Fond memories of my first 7MHz 8086 rig.

    • tsk
    • 2 years ago

    5:10
    A wild Jeff appears!
    [url<]https://youtu.be/mJpo92xQjZU[/url<]

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 2 years ago

      You can add a time index to your YouTube links:
      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJpo92xQjZU&t=306s[/url<]

    • ozzuneoj
    • 2 years ago

    Please please please include an overclocked i5 2500K (and maybe a 2600K) in the review. PLEASE!

    My system is still kicking after 7 years, but at some point there has to be a good upgrade option that makes economical sense for me. RAM prices basically kill my desire to upgrade, but if a DDR4 deal were to pop up and I had a good reason to move my current rig to serve a different role in the house, I’d need to know what chip best suits my needs.

    • Thbbft
    • 2 years ago

    A spanish site just released gaming and productivity benchmarks of the 2700X on a X470 board. Beats the 8700 on the majority of games and nearly all productivity benchmarks.

    The pre-benchmarked preorder 2700X is now in the no. 2 spot in Amazon’s bestselling CPUs list (not the new processor bestselling list). That’s slightly insane.

    If it matches the 8700 in gaming the 8700 is going down in flames.

    Threadripper 2 will be an outright massacre.

      • albundy
      • 2 years ago

      matches? are you using onboard graphics for gaming? the 8700 vs 1700x debacle is irrelevant when it comes to gaming. its your video card that matters.

        • synthtel2
        • 2 years ago

        CPU performance at that level is only irrelevant if you’re running a 60 Hz monitor. When 144 is the target, any little boost you can get is still useful.

      • blastdoor
      • 2 years ago

      Threadripper is a really compelling product.

      I’m heavily invested in the Apple ecosystem, but Threadripper is probably the best argument I know of to get/build a Linux box.

        • adamlongwalker
        • 2 years ago

        I’m running a 3 OS system on my 1800X. Rig One of them is Zorin 12.2 Linux and it was by far the easiest setup of the 3 OS’s I run The other 2 are Win 7 and Win 10.

        Everything was up and running with no tweaking in 20 or so minutes. I’m trying to slowly take my work into Linux as I have no more faith in both Apple and Microsoft. I hate windows 10 so much that I’m running a modified version with a Windows 7 type of an interface. Once I’ve done my tweaks I am happy with it (it runs sweet) but not to the point of stopping me going fully into Linux in the future.

        I think anyone who is serious about their systems should use Linux as a back up as it is free and it runs just about everything that you need in a business aspect. Gaming is another matter still though I think it will eventually get there as well.

      • Pancake
      • 2 years ago

      This here august website has the 8700K running 30-40% better frame rates than the 1800X in gaming tests in their review. If you think a 5% clock rate increase is going to allow the 2700X to catch up you’re very optimistic. Even if the 2700X could bring the margin down to a solid 30% that’s still an absurdly MASSIVE margin to the Intel chip. You’d have to be nuts to not buy Intel if you’re building a gaming rig.

        • Krogoth
        • 2 years ago

        Ryzen+ chips are actually more closer to their Skylake family counterparts in gaming due to tweaked cache/CCX which addressed some of the latency issues that hurt first generation Ryzens. Skylake stuff is only faster because they are able to hit higher clockspeeds out of the box and with some overclocking.

        You are grasping at straws to think either platform is “better” at gaming unless you are on a very tight budget or have very specific gaming needs (grand strategy games, Dwarf Fortress, RTS etc.)

        144Mhz+ argument doesn’t cut because in most cases you are far more-GPU bound than CPU-bound.

    • FuturePastNow
    • 2 years ago

    I wonder how that 2600X compares to my elderly Gulftown Xeon with the same core/thread counts, similar clock speed, and double the TDP.

    • HERETIC
    • 2 years ago

    As a cautious over-clocker,I feel AMD and Intel have now STOLEN our OC’s.
    That sweet spot on the bathtub curve we all used to aim at for our 24/7 OC’s
    has now become the default turbo speed. Leaving us the Will Robinson if
    we dare.

      • ozzuneoj
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, its starting to get really obvious that they were just stringing things along for years by keeping the clocks low. We’ve been hitting these clocks for almost 10 years now, but they’re just starting to become “stock”, and chips can’t be pushed much farther.

      Gone are the days of 30%-50% overclocks on air cooling…

      • Krogoth
      • 2 years ago

      No, it is because silicon has been running out of clockspeed headroom since early 2010s.

      Turbo clocking just makes arm-chair overclocking obsolete (majority of overclockers do this for 24/7 systems). Overclocking over exists for its own sake (epenis benchmarking on suicide runs using exotic cooling)

    • odizzido
    • 2 years ago

    Really looking forward to the review of this thing πŸ™‚ I would love to see a 2500K or i5 750 as well, even if it’s for just a few tests.

    • DragonDaddyBear
    • 2 years ago

    The original wraith cooler was pretty good, about as good as the Evo 212 as I recall. That should handle a mild overclock no problem. Being RGB means it will probably be even more popular. Adding in a caching solution that is not vendor locked in sweetens the deal. AMD really seems to be going for a bang for the buck approach. If only those old, over priced GPUs were in stock at their MSRP it would be an amazing build.

    • smilingcrow
    • 2 years ago

    β€œThe first thing you’ll note regarding these second-generation Ryzen parts is that clocks are way up compared to their first-generation counterparts.”

    What I noticed was a 5% increase at the top end clock speed accompanied by a TDP increase of just over double that.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 2 years ago

      the 2700, 2600x and 2600 all have clock increases with no TDP change relative to their gen 1 parts

        • techguy
        • 2 years ago

        That is incorrect. 2700x has a TDP of 105W whereas 1800x has a 95W TDP. 5% increase in clock for ~10% increase in power, as smilingcrow said.

          • BobbinThreadbare
          • 2 years ago

          I didn’t list the 2700x

            • techguy
            • 2 years ago

            Smilingcrow’s point is demonstrably true. CPU power consumption scales in a logarithmic fashion with clock speed. The 10% power increase for a 5% clock speed increase is precisely what we would expect to observe given the boost clock of the 2700x compared to that of the 2700 (4.3GHz vs. 4.1GHz).

            Your counterpoint about the several SKUs below the 2700x not seeing TDP increases compared to 1st gen Ryzen SKUs with similar clock speeds is expected behavior given the minor variation in clock speeds and the improved fabrication process involved. The 2700 (non-X) for example sees only a 100MHz bump over the 1800x in the same power envelope (95W). This is no doubt due to leakage improvements in Glofo’s 12nm process compared to the prior 14nm process.

      • blastdoor
      • 2 years ago

      yeah, me too….

      But it’s a nice price cut.

        • techguy
        • 2 years ago

        $329 for the 2700x is very compelling. AMD has done a fantastic job with Zen. Too bad you can’t say the same for Vega.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          They didn’t do great [url=https://techreport.com/review/32391/amd-radeon-rx-vega-64-and-rx-vega-56-graphics-cards-reviewed<]out of the gate[/url<] with Vega. But as you can see in TR's [url=https://techreport.com/review/32766/nvidia-geforce-gtx-1070-ti-graphics-card-reviewed<]GTX 1070Ti review[/url<], Vega has matured pretty nicely, which Vega64 tying or slightly beating the 1080 much of the time. Too bad you can't buy one.

      • Jtaylor1986
      • 2 years ago

      I think you are going to see all core turbos at least 10% higher than the previous gen. Single core performance hasn’t bumped up that much though.

    • Doctor Venture
    • 2 years ago

    Any ETA on possible architectural differences between Ryzen 2, and Ryzen/Ryzen+ ?

      • Ninjitsu
      • 2 years ago

      Yeah, April 19th, it says in the article.

        • Doctor Venture
        • 2 years ago

        I saw that. After I read some articles on other sites, they make it sound more like Zen+ made on 12nm process, with higher XFR. I was hoping for some more significant changes architecure-wise, but that may not be in the cards. πŸ™

        • Shobai
        • 2 years ago

        That’s tomorrow! Weee!

          • Shobai
          • 2 years ago

          Now it’s today!

            • Shobai
            • 2 years ago

            Oh man, now it’s only 3hrs until it’s the 20th =/

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Based on what we’ve heard so far Ryzen 2018 will not really receive any major architectural differences. Or maybe there won’t even be any architectural changes at all. They’re just tweaking power management and Turbo Core maybe, and moving to 12nm, which is probably just a tweaked 14nm node. So yeah, tweaks only, nothing too exciting. But I hope they’ll surprise us.

        • Chrispy_
        • 2 years ago

        I’ll wait to see the review but more recent 1000-series Ryzens indicate that the small improvement in clockspeeds is likely to just be gradual refinement of the process. Not only is the new 12nm marginally better than the old 14nm, but the old 14nm was better at the end of the run than it was at the launch of Ryzen.

        [list<][*<]The first Ryzen I bought was a 1700 and it really didn't like being overclocked at all. [/*<][*<]About 6 months ago I bought the 1800X and 1600, both of which were good for 4.1 with moderate voltage tweaks (both at 1.375V). [/*<][*<]A 1600X bought for a friend in January is quite happy at 4.3GHz and could maybe be pushed higher with better cooling and more voltage.[/*<][/list<] So, small sample size of four I'm afraid, but that's my data.

        • Doctor Venture
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, it looks like I confused Ryzen2 with the Zen2 arch , which won’t be out until next year at the earliest. It’s kinda weird that they included the X470 chipset in the embargo, too.

    • techguy
    • 2 years ago

    I’ll be honest, this new method of extending the hype cycle with each product release is annoying. IIRC AMD began this trend last year. I hope other vendors don’t join in.

      • ArdWar
      • 2 years ago

      Hype too much and you’ll get [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_effect<]Osborne effect[/url<]

        • Voldenuit
        • 2 years ago

        What’s the reverse-Osborne? When a new product isn’t worth upgrading for?

        I’m still on Haswell because if I’m getting a new CPU, it better be gosh-darned [i<]fast[/i<].

    • brucek2
    • 2 years ago

    Sounds promising and I’m excited to read the full review.

    I do not understand why AMD is embargoing performance information, which to me gives this announcement an unpleasant odor of used car salesmanship even though this announcement seems like it would already be positive even if it was solely about the price drops.

    Does someone in their marketing department actually believe it is a positive, brand-enhancing technique to release information in drips & drabs? I’ve got to believe for most purchasers this is not an impulse buy like a soda pop or a sneaker, it is a considered purchase where withheld information is always going to be an annoyance.

      • MOSFET
      • 2 years ago

      I think they need to go ahead and announce to keep interest up, and it’s not a terrible idea to give consumers an idea of what’s coming soon. But a few more weeks for fuller channel distribution (or possibly still packaging) and avoiding a paper launch is also not a terrible idea.

        • ArdWar
        • 2 years ago

        Embargo also might be in place to give reviewers enough time to do a proper, more thorough review.

        Without it most likely it’ll become a race down the drain to publish a “review” first with rushed test, if at all.

    • tipoo
    • 2 years ago

    Does StoreMi (lol with the timing of the name, saying it out loud) move files you use more to the fastest storage tiers, or does tiering mean it fills one first onwards down?

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      It’s a block-level (not file-level) system that moves the most frequently used blocks to the fastest tiers of storage.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        I think Blastdoor literally just lost his mind.

          • blastdoor
          • 2 years ago

          [url<]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_projection[/url<]

        • blastdoor
        • 2 years ago

        Very cool! Can’t wait to see it reviewed!

        Edit β€” sorry if I missed this but is Stormi windows only or is there also Linux support?

        • tipoo
        • 2 years ago

        Right on, very much what I wanted a solution on Windows for.

      • Mr Bill
      • 2 years ago

      Finally, a use for an Optane stick!

    • Takeshi7
    • 2 years ago

    Is StoreMI built into the BIOS firmware or is it software that sits on top of Windows? I’ll be way less interested if it’s the latter.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      It’s a Windows utility.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        Here’s the [url=https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Bcache<]Linux Version[/url<] [quote<]Bcache is in the mainline kernel since 3.10. The kernel on the arch install disk includes the bcache module since 2013.08.01.[/quote<] THANK YOU FOR DOING THIS FIVE YEARS AGO AMD!

    • blastdoor
    • 2 years ago

    This looks mostly like a price cut that is presumably enabled by better yields from a tweaked manufacturing process.

    • Kretschmer
    • 2 years ago

    Is anyone else worried that AMD is increasing power draw again as their way of boosting top SKU performance?

    Will the 5700X be a 150W processor?

      • Waco
      • 2 years ago

      Smells like the Radeons of late. I bet the headroom on the chips is a few hundred MHz at best even with the tweaks.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        We’ll see how TR does, but the early overclocking results floating around seem to show that you can generally get all 8 cores up close to the standard single-core turbo boost speed (e.g. 4.2 – 4.3GHz).

        The voltage levels being quote were pretty high though (around 1.4V).

          • Waco
          • 2 years ago

          That’s about what I expect, but power usage will be through the roof just like Ryzen and Coffee at high clocks all core.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Yep. Kinda feel it but hopefully they’ll fire that Robert “8-ball” Hallock first before he thinks of pulling another rabbit out of his hat again. Hallock is the funny guy who thunk of pushing the FX for all it’s worth.

      • Jeff Kampman
      • 2 years ago

      I can’t comment specifically on performance yet but higher TDP is not necessarily a bad thing if it’s accompanied by high(er) performance per watt. People (wrongly) lost their minds about Skylake-X power, for example, when those chips’ task energy expenditures were actually lower than the competition in stuff like Blender because they were so fast.

        • Waco
        • 2 years ago

        Math is hard for many. πŸ™‚ I’d love a kilowatt chip with a low idle power and good task energy but it would never sell because of “high power use”.

          • ronch
          • 2 years ago

          Tell me about it. Sometimes I wish I had an FPU inside my head to help with math. Heck, even the FPU of the Cyrix 6×86 would do.

        • Kretschmer
        • 2 years ago

        Thanks for the thoughtful response. I worry about higher TDP not due to task power or watts consumed but rather due to the heat, noise, PSU wattage, and other consequences of a high peak power draw.

        • blastdoor
        • 2 years ago

        Interesting… I had assumed that this revision to Ryzen would basically be a process tweak to enable higher clock speeds and better yields…. I didn’t think there would be any major IPC improvements. But if there are, that would certainly be a pleasant surprise!

      • Firestarter
      • 2 years ago

      I’d love a 150W CPU that can beat Intel at their own game. I don’t care much about who does the overclocking (me or Intel/AMD) as long as the performance is there. I mean, of course it’s fun to do it yourself but the end goal is pretty much the same isn’t it? Regardless of whether the goal is the biggest bang/buck or the fastest gaming PC, either way clocks are going to be turned up to the limit. There’s always the option of backing down a bit if it gets too loud or hot

        • Jeff Kampman
        • 2 years ago

        That part already exists, it has a 180 W TDP, and it’s called the Threadripper 1950X πŸ˜‰

          • Klimax
          • 2 years ago

          Two misses: 150W and beat.

          • Firestarter
          • 2 years ago

          more cores != beating intel

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            Or, you know, you could build the machine you need instead of the one you think will “beat Intel”.

            But who does that anyway?

            • Firestarter
            • 2 years ago

            that machine will have an Intel CPU, because single thread performance is what I need for my games to run well

            I’d love to put an AMD CPU in my next PC, and if it needs a 150W TDP to earn that spot then that’s what it takes. I don’t care much because I’d just as soon replace it with a 200W Intel CPU if I think it’s worth it

            edit: I guess people miss my point completely

            • Mikael33
            • 2 years ago

            You’re probably getting down voted because of this [url<]https://techreport.com/review/31366/amd-ryzen-7-1800x-ryzen-7-1700x-and-ryzen-7-1700-cpus-reviewed/7[/url<] tl;dr: Ryzen is plenty fast for gaming

            • Firestarter
            • 2 years ago

            Since when do we settle for ‘plenty’ fast? If plenty is good enough I might as well give up on trying to squeeze any extra performance out of my PC by overclocking, which is what I was on about with respect to that 150W TDP. I’m saying that I’d love an AMD CPU that has (after OCing) the single threaded performance to convincingly *beat* Intel CPUs *in games*, regardless of TDP. For many/most other applications ther Ryzen is already the better choice because AMD offers more total processing power for less money, but I don’t really do that much demanding stuff with my PC other than gaming so that’s not really a strong selling point for me

            • Mikael33
            • 2 years ago

            You probably should give up overclocking your CPU for gaming performance, as it simply isn’t doing to help you any when you turn up the graphics options, provided you’re not running a potato CPU, like a AMD FX series CPU. Also looking at the frame times between Ryzen and the Intel CPUs in CPU limited scenarios, are you telling me you think you can somehow tell a difference when both of them provide buttery smooth frame times?

            • Firestarter
            • 2 years ago

            I’m not going to defend my being a PC hardware enthusiast on techreport.com of all websites

            • Mikael33
            • 2 years ago

            I’m not criticizing you for that, I overclock my 6700K just because I can and my 980 Ti because it shows tangible framerate/frametime differences, I’m simply stating that implying Ryzen isn’t good for gaming is inane. As a hardware enthusiast you should realize that the GPU is the bottleneck in gaming the vast majority of the time, so focusing on the minor frame rate /time differences between an Intel chip and an AMD chip at settings specifically designed to show the differences in CPU performance is silly since at actual settings/resolutions you’ll be gaming at the differences between them will evaporate, therefore Intel having a bit better single threaded performance is irrelevant, since it results in no actual frame rate or frametime differences, both of them being more than fast enough.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 2 years ago

            An enthusiast wants the best experience and Intel CPUs and Nvidia graphics provide that. Many people on this site are AMD deniers and apologists who haven’t seen benchmarks showing an 8700k beating up Ryzen in gaming. That cannot be denied unless a person has a motive that’s not disclosed. 144hz+ is what many enthusiasts have and Intel CPUs provide the power to pursue that refresh rate.

            You have to defend because the apologists and deniers will attempt to ignore reality. Lots of AMD shilling on this site.

            In summary, many people on here are poseur enthusiasts and would be better served by a console.

            • Mikael33
            • 2 years ago

            Rofl

            • Redocbew
            • 2 years ago

            Cool story bro.

            • Srsly_Bro
            • 2 years ago

            People at Tom’s hardware are more enthusiastic than the majority of the “enthusiasts” here. The normies have arrived.

            • Mr Bill
            • 2 years ago

            Shilling for your thoughts?

            • synthtel2
            • 2 years ago

            With a 144 Hz monitor in more complex multiplayer scenarios, CPU performance is very far from good enough to not matter.

            With an R7 1700 and a GTX 960, you’d think the limiting factor would be obvious, but really the 960 is only going to be the next thing to get upgraded because options massively faster than it actually exist. If I could double CPU performance across the board for the same cost as doubling GPU performance (including not needing ridiculous voltage), I’d definitely boost the CPU first.

            • Mikael33
            • 2 years ago

            If you have a 144hz monitor (hopefully variable refresh rate) and smart you’re not going to spare much expenses on CPU or GPUs, so Ryzen’s price per performance probably isn’t as important to you as outright performance, so you’re of course going to want the fastest CPU for gaming, so the perhaps barely perceptible difference in high-end Amd and Intel CPUs would be important to you in that scenario.
            The 1700 is a bit relatively slow in some games, I’ve never been a strong proponent of budget graphic cards for that reason, you can easily double your performance and shift the bottleneck to your CPU, if you have a similarly inexpensive CPU and the money you save on your video card is a bit moot when you have to upgrade it sooner.

            • synthtel2
            • 2 years ago

            I’d rather have a good monitor and weak compute driving it than the other way around, and the hardware I own reflects that preference. Not having a lot of money to throw at it, “smart” means prioritization, not simply knowing what an ideal setup would be.

            144 Hz isn’t that premium. I only paid $400 for my monitor (which has a lot going for it in addition to 144 Hz), and for a desktop I’d sooner go back to spinning rust than 60 Hz. VRR is non-essential for me; tearing never bothered me anyway, and it’s even less noticeable at 90+.

            • Mikael33
            • 2 years ago

            Yes, personal preference and all, I happen to own both a good monitor and good hardware but you wouldn’t like my monitor since it’s a 32″ 60hz VA panel (doubles as my TV.)

            You’re absolutely right, it isn’t, you just make sacrifices like IQ, resolution and size to meet the lower, more affordable price points at 144hz, so then you have a good hardware and a good monitor, if a good monitor to you simply means having a 144hz refresh rate. The kind of 144hz monitor I’d like to run doesn’t exactly go for cheap, in terms of size and resolution and I considered my monitor a tad pricey at a bit over $500.

            • synthtel2
            • 2 years ago

            [url=https://techreport.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=37&t=120001<]It's really not a bad monitor in any way.[/url<] If I'd add something to it, it'd just be HDR, but I'd rather wait until standards for that settle down a bit anyway. It looks like 144 Hz monitors start around $200 for really bottom-of-the-barrel stuff and $250 for less sucky ones, so if I'd cut out some pixels and space and sent the extra money back in time, I could have been using a souped-up GTX 970 or baseline 980 instead of this 960. If all I did with it was play games that'd be preferable, but I don't and it isn't, and had it gone that way I'd simply be in the market for both a new GPU and a new monitor right now instead of only the one.

            • Firestarter
            • 2 years ago

            thanks for understanding

      • Freon
      • 2 years ago

      New arch every 5 years, followed by 4 years of overclocking.

      • just brew it!
      • 2 years ago

      They’re still 20W below the 8-core FX chips (not counting the ridiculous “factory overclocked”
      stunt chips in the FX line).

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    Perhaps some faster models are in the works but if these models will be representative of pretty much almost the entire range of ReRyzen processors then they do seem to be even more competitively priced than when Ryzen 1 came out last year. Yes they’re maybe a little less compelling from a perf/$ perspective for now since they’re new but the entire stack’s ASP is lower and it has nowhere to go but down. And while, yes, Ryzen 1 was an entirely new CPU and AMD did have the right to price it even higher than how they did last year, you can’t say these new chips have lost any luster. IMHO buying AMD just became a bit more compelling. Let’s hope they’ve ironed out all the teething issues that hurt Ryzen last year as well.

    • ronch
    • 2 years ago

    StoreMI? You gonna store me where? WTH did I do???

    Alternatively…

    Let’s hope it’s not gonna be StoreMI seas once these chips face off against whatever Intel’s marinating in the kitchen. (Sorry, been watching too much Gordon Ramsay these days!!)

    AMD marketers. /face-palm

      • tipoo
      • 2 years ago

      Finally, a place to StoreMi Daniels catalog.

        • ronch
        • 2 years ago

        Great comment. Guess you had a trump card up your sleeve.

      • EndlessWaves
      • 2 years ago

      With the new + models intel have given you the once-in-a-generation opportunity to optane their cache modules.

      If you’re feeling cheerful you could i5 the shop attendant on the way out.

    • Growler
    • 2 years ago

    Second-generation Ryzen: Now with 20% more Buffalo!

      • Concupiscence
      • 2 years ago

      I feel really bad for asking at this point, but I never got the buffalo reference in connection to Ryzen. My embarrassment for waiting this long to ask is being outstripped by my curiosity.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        The Buffalo is actually a Canary: [url<]https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2014/04/warrant-canary-faq[/url<] Replace the "warrant" with the "NDA" and you get the idea.

          • Concupiscence
          • 2 years ago

          Aha. That was the last tidbit I needed, just managed to stumble onto the TR thread asking for “buffalo”/”not buffalo.” Thank you!

    • thedosbox
    • 2 years ago

    Where are the cats?! Ryzen reveal = kitty. Those are the rules!

      • drfish
      • 2 years ago

      Your comments put you in danger of being typecats.

        • thedosbox
        • 2 years ago

        I’m feeline with that.

          • Redocbew
          • 2 years ago

          Yes, I’m sure he’ll land on his feet.

        • Mr Bill
        • 2 years ago

        The win will be by a whisker; regardless.

          • stdRaichu
          • 2 years ago

          Purrportedly.

            • Mr Bill
            • 2 years ago

            Let’s not kibble about it.

      • willmore
      • 2 years ago

      They don’t want to be accused of being copy cats.

    • JosiahBradley
    • 2 years ago

    Does this mean the 2000 series APUs fill the Quad core spot?

      • chuckula
      • 2 years ago

      As happened the last time around, there will probably be lower-end parts coming later this year.

      [Score one for the AMD fanboys who literally downthumb comments predicting that AMD will come out with new products. With “friends” like these it’s no wonder AMD would rather sell to miners.]

        • JosiahBradley
        • 2 years ago

        No clue who down-voted you you made a reasonable assumption.

        • Demetri
        • 2 years ago

        If they do, I would expect them to be based on Raven Ridge. They were disabling good cores on some of last year’s Ryzens, and there doesn’t seem to be a need for that anymore with the quad core role fulfilled with a separate chip. Triple core Raven Ridge? That could become a thing.

      • Concupiscence
      • 2 years ago

      At least for the time being, that’s probably a safe assumption. They may eventually amass enough dies incapable of running with more enabled cores to justify a run of 2400/2400X parts. But at this moment, with discrete GPU prices still normalizing and the Vega IGPs offering good value for money, that’s probably a smarter priority for AMD.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Last but not least, AMD sent along a kit of G.Skill's Sniper X DDR4-3400 memory. This is the fastest memory kit that AMD has sent us for testing its Ryzen products so far. Make of that what you will.[/quote<] I will make "Ryzen+ supports slightly higher memory clocks" of that.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Don’t be so sure. Have it confirmed by Chucky here first.

      Chuck?

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        If by “slightly” you mean “massively” then I will confirm.

          • ronch
          • 2 years ago

          We’ll wait.

      • Welch
      • 2 years ago

      I make of it that 3400mhz is their supported memory, but that they can probably use OC RAM 3-400mhz faster.

    • psuedonymous
    • 2 years ago

    Launch 4 high-end CPUs to meet the timeline of a competitor’s full-range launch? Hmm, where have we seen that before…

    Though in all seriousness, AMD’s “we’ll take your money now, you can get your reviews later” embargo dates do rather irk.

      • Goty
      • 2 years ago

      The competitors “full-range launch” is actually “launching the rest of the parts that should have been launched with the first handful of chips but they weren’t yet ready in large enough volumes because Intel had to pull the launch in as a response to Ryzen.”

      These parts from AMD have been slated for release around this time for at least a year. It would be awfully hard to construe this as a response to Intel, especially considering that AMD could have easily allowed outlets to report at least this much information last week if they really wanted to steal some of Intel’s spotlight.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        [quote<]These parts from Intel have been slated for release around this time for at least a year. It would be awfully hard to construe this as a response to AMD, especially considering that Intel could have easily allowed outlets to report at least this much information last week if they really wanted to steal some of AMD's spotlight.[/quote<] Said nobody ever prior to the Ice Lake launch.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 2 years ago

          I find anything other than pricing to be difficult to construe as a response to competitors. Pricing on Ryzen+ is lower because 6 cores from Intel is cheaper now. But the chips themselves were always planned. Same with the 8th-gen Core i5 and i7 chips – they were always planned, but might have been priced higher without Ryzen. Pricing is easy to change. Designs are hard.

            • Goty
            • 2 years ago

            Oh, sure, I agree on the pricing front; I’m just responding to the timeline part.

            The timing of this announcement isn’t really conspicuous at all. If it had been done last week when Intel released the rest of the Coffee Lake chips, then sure, but announcing the chips at the end of this week doesn’t really do anything to stifle interest in the Intel stuff.

      • Zizy
      • 2 years ago

      These chips cover all the range previous chips did – the same parts, just refreshed.
      It isn’t like AMD launched a few select samples and left suspicious gaps in the lineup, like Intel.

      There is nothing left for AMD to launch, except for TR, likely 2300G and perhaps 2100G.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Didn’t they also have a pre-order thing last year? IIRC that was the first time we’ve heard of CPU pre-order. But this year it’s obviously much easier to pre-order these chips because we already know so much about Ryzen’s profile.

      • w76
      • 2 years ago

      A competitors full-range launch? Let’s be real, we’re still pretty much rehashing Skylake on the Intel side, with a couple extra cores as an emergency competitive measure. We won’t see a launch of a truly new product range from Intel until they hammer out the transition to the next node, as I understand it.

      If Ryzen 2nd gen counts as little as the Kaby Lake -> Coffee Lake does, well, apparently TR can’t tell us just yet. πŸ™‚

    • K-L-Waster
    • 2 years ago

    So far doesn’t look like a game changer compared to the gen 1 parts (other than the pricing compared to launch — of course, AMD dropped the pricing on the gen 1s a while back too).

    If you have a RyZen gen1, there probably isn’t much reason to switch to gen 2 — these look like an improvement, but not enough to warrant upgrading.

    They do look attractive for new systems, though, and they improve AMD’s competitive positioning relative to the Coffee Lake parts.

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      That’s always been true with every CPU iteration since forever. A bit more clock speed here, a bit more IPC there. And a slight bump in pricing while they cut prices on older stuff. But everyone needs to keep the ball moving forward.

        • K-L-Waster
        • 2 years ago

        Agreed.

        I know there were some commenters who thought RyZen+ would be as much of a jump as RyZen was over piledriver. Those folks will be disappointed. But people with more realistic expectations will see this as a good incremental refresh.

          • ronch
          • 2 years ago

          Almost never happens. Or never did. Unless they had a big A-HA! moment with a later iteration. Like, “Oh jeez John we forgot to include the L2 cache last year!!”

          • Krogoth
          • 2 years ago

          I had expected to be as much of a jump as K6 to K6-2.

            • K-L-Waster
            • 2 years ago

            Based on the clock jumps I’m expecting a Skylake-to-Kaby Lake level increase.

            • Krogoth
            • 2 years ago

            It is the same jump if you factor in Turbo clock speeds. The days of massive clockspeed boosts between generations ended with Pentium 4.

            • ronch
            • 2 years ago

            Adding L2 is something like adding an integrated memory controller. You open the flood gates and feed the core a huge buffet of data. But as one Intel bloke once said when they still didn’t have IMC, (paraphrase) that’s a low-hanging fruit, and after you do that, then what?

        • blastdoor
        • 2 years ago

        There have been many CPU iterations that yielded much larger improvements relative to their immediate predecessors. A few examples:

        Nehalem
        Sandy Bridge
        Haswell (maybe)
        Every single A-SOC that Apple has introduced

          • chuckula
          • 2 years ago

          [quote<]There have been many CPU iterations that yielded much larger improvements relative to their immediate predecessors. A few examples: Nehalem Sandy Bridge Haswell (maybe) Every single A-SOC that Apple has introduced[/quote<] LMFTFY: There have been many [u<]Apple[/u<] CPU iterations that yielded much larger improvements relative to their immediate predecessors. A few examples: [s<]Nehalem Sandy Bridge Haswell (maybe)[/s<] Every single A-SOC that Apple has introduced [u<]and don't even get me started about the A4 that was [b<]literally infinitely faster[/b<] than the A1 - A3![/u<]

            • freebird
            • 2 years ago

            It also helps the new one perform better than the old ones when Apple decides to down-clock older silicon because of an aging battery… lol!

      • blastdoor
      • 2 years ago

      This reminds me a bit of Devil’s Canyon.

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        ESPECIALLY THE GPU AND THE MINI-NUC FORM FACTOR.

    • Zizy
    • 2 years ago

    2600X sounds nice, finally AMD is giving people reason to consider their X chips.

    It seems just about all of it has been leaked already, spoiling most of the fun. But I still want to see the frametime tests here to see how good/bad it really is πŸ˜› Fortunately, RAM and GPU prices are preventing me from preordering 2600X.

    As for good reasons to not have 2800X, I assume 2700X matches 1800X performance and TR is serving as that “highend premium thingy” already, so why bother having a flagship on AM4 that nobody buys.

    I wonder why AMD increased the TDP to 105W. It probably didn’t give them more than about 100MHz on MT (and nothing on ST, see 2600X). Why bother? They could just ask reviewers to run the tests with other cTDPs and keep the default at 95W, like before. Say request cTDP 45W, cTDP 95W (default) and cTDP 125W to be tested (if such wide range is possible – 2xxxG are limited to just 46-65W).

      • K-L-Waster
      • 2 years ago

      TBH, having the 1800X, the 1700X, and the 1700 didn’t make a lot of sense in the original lineup. Streamlining it to one XFR model and one standard model makes for a clearer product line.

        • auxy
        • 2 years ago

        _(:3γ€βˆ )_ Sigh…
        Every Ryzen ever forever has XFR.

          • K-L-Waster
          • 2 years ago

          “X Models with bigger XFR boost than the non-X models” is a bit awkward to type every time…

          • ronch
          • 2 years ago

          It’s always been there but no X means no XFR. No extra blazing 50 megahurts for you.

            • synthtel2
            • 2 years ago

            My 1700 non-X XFRs by 50 MHz.

            The number that could stand more attention IMHO is the all-core boost. I don’t think 3.0 is a number I’ve ever seen from either of my 1700s – 3.2 is the usual when spooled all the way up, and sometimes 3.25 on the golden sample.

            • ronch
            • 2 years ago

            Nah that’s fake XFR. No X no XFR.

            /trollolololol

        • freebird
        • 2 years ago

        Yeah, that’s why I doubt we’ll see an 2800X unless they cherry pick some 12nm parts or the process improves over the rest of 2018.

    • chuckula
    • 2 years ago

    [quote<]Finally, it's absorbed both the Ryzen 7 1700X and Ryzen 7 1800X's roles in the first-generation Ryzen lineup. There are good reasons for all of this, but you'll have to sit tight until April 19 to learn more.[/quote<] RYZEN 2800X AT 5GHz... wait for it.... CONFIRMED! EDIT: But then again, only 5GHz isn't enough, let's do round 2: RYZEN 2800X AT 5GHz *with freakin' Vega and HBM slapped in next to it and infinity fabric ZOMG* ... wait for it.... CONFIRMED!

      • ronch
      • 2 years ago

      Thanks for CONFIRMING EVERYTHING for us, Chuck!! Really appreciate it!! πŸ™‚

        • chuckula
        • 2 years ago

        People around here need certainty.

          • ronch
          • 2 years ago

          Certainly.

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