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AMD Ryzen Pro APUs swoop into business-friendly desktops and notebooks


Zen and Vega get down to business

AMD dipped a toe back into the world of corporate PCs last year with its Ryzen Pro family of desktop processors. On top of the Zen architecture's competitive processing performance, those chips exposed business-friendly features from the AMD Secure Processor that's baked into every Ryzen chip to protect data, empower administrators with open-source DASH remote manageability features, and provide PC makers with hardware roots of trust for secure boot and trusted computing applications.

There was one problem with Ryzen Pro desktop systems, though. Integrated graphics processors of some kind are mandatory for the vast majority of business computing tasks, and first-generation Ryzen Pro desktops needed a discrete graphics card to light up cubicle dwellers' monitors. AMD also didn't have a mobile chip ready to go against Intel's vPro-ready Core i5s and Core i7s. Today's on-the-go workforce simply couldn't choose a notebook with Ryzen inside.

AMD is plugging the holes in its business-friendly desktop and laptop offerings today with its first Ryzen Pro APUs, all powered by the same Raven Ridge silicon we know from Ryzen Mobile and Ryzen G-series processors. Those chips are ready for the boardroom inside a wide range of business-friendly desktops and notebooks from Dell, HP, and Lenovo. I took a short trip to AMD's new headquarters in Santa Clara, California last week to hear from AMD and its partners about the systems they're building with Raven Ridge.

  Cores/
threads
Base
clock
(GHz)
Boost
clock
(GHz)
Vega
IGP
Peak
graphics
clock
(MHz)
TDP
Ryzen 7 Pro 2700U 4/8 2.2 3.8 10 CUs 1300 12–25 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 2500U 2.0 3.6 8 CUs 1100
Ryzen 3 Pro 2300U 4/4 2.5 3.5 6 CUs

Seven Raven Ridge Ryzen Pro parts are launching today. For notebooks, the Ryzen 7 Pro 2700U offers four Zen cores and eight threads with a 3.8-GHz peak clock speed and a 2.2-GHz base clock alongside 10 Vega compute units operating around 1300 MHz. The Ryzen 5 Pro 2500U has the same four cores and eight threads, but it dials peak clock speeds back to 3.6 GHz and base speeds back to 2 GHz. Its eight Vega compute units will run around 1100 MHz.

The Ryzen 3 Pro 2300U forms the foundation of the trio with four cores and four threads running at 3.4-GHz peak speeds and 2.5-GHz base speeds. It has six Vega compute units running around 1100 MHz. All of these parts will have 15-W default TDPs, and they can be configured to run at anywhere from 12 W to 25 W depending on a system integrator's design parameters.

  Cores/
threads
Base
clock
(GHz)
Boost
clock
(GHz)
Vega
IGP
Peak
graphics
clock
(MHz)
TDP
Ryzen 5 Pro 2400G 4/8 3.6 3.9 11 CUs 1250 65 W
Ryzen 5 Pro 2400GE 3.2 3.8 35 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 2200G 4/4 3.5 3.7 8 CUs 1100 65 W
Ryzen 3 Pro 2200GE 3.2 3.6 35 W

On the desktop, system integrators will have four parts to choose from. The Ryzen 5 Pro 2400G runs at the same 3.9-GHz peak clock and 3.6-GHz base clock as its plebeian counterpart, and its 11 Vega CUs ought to run in the same 1250-MHz range as the non-Pro chip's. In turn, the Ryzen 3 Pro 2200G will have a 3.5-GHz base clock and 3.7-GHz peak clock, and its Vega 8 graphics processor should run in the 1100-MHz range. AMD will also offer Pro versions of its 35-W Ryzen GE parts.

AMD released internal performance numbers for the range of Raven Ridge Pro parts, but we're past the point where it's necessary to rely on internal benchmarks to understand the performance picture for this silicon. We've reviewed Ryzen Mobile in the form of the Ryzen 5 2500U and desktop Raven Ridge in the form of the Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G. If you're interested in how those chips stack up against the competition, our numbers provide a thorough picture.

Most importantly for businesses (and prosumers) looking to purchase Ryzen Pro systems, AMD has scored several design wins in premium business-ready systems from the big three PC makers: HP, Dell, and Lenovo. Those designs aren't mere second-string concessions to choice. At the top end, they'll carry familiar EliteBook, Latitude, and ThinkPad branding for mobile systems, and EliteDesk, Optiplex, and ThinkCentre brands on the desktop. We had an opportunity to see and handle all of these systems at AMD's event last week. Let's look at the various twists the big three put on Ryzen Pro for mobile and desktop systems now.