Building a basic gaming PC with AMD’s Ryzen 3 2200G

As my friends know, I have a peculiar fondness for testing the limits of low-grade hardware. For that reason, when AMD’s Ryzen processors with Radeon Vega Graphics—better known as “the Ryzen APUs”—finally hit the market I was pretty eager to pick one up and play with it. Budget constraints left me unable to do so until just recently. One of my friends ended up with a spare Ryzen 3 2200G that she passed on to me to play with.

While I certainly appreciated the gesture, it seemed a bit of a waste at the time. I didn’t have a motherboard to put it in, nor any RAM to use with it even if I did. DDR4 was (and is) still prohibitively expensive. Plus, I didn’t want to buy cheapo low-speed RAM for use with an APU. Even though I had the rest of the parts, I wasn’t about to slap down some $300 so that I could build out a machine purely to satisfy my curiosity.

That changed when Patriot sent me some of its Viper White LED memory alongside its Viper V570 gaming mouse a while back. A pair of 8-GB sticks transferring data at up to 3600 MT/s was a fine match for that Ryzen APU, at least on paper. The pieces were coming together: I had suitable storage on the shelf, an overkill power supply, and an excess of cases to choose from stacked up in the closet.

Image: Gigabyte

All I needed was the motherboard. A cursory glance at Newegg listings told me that I could find a suitable foundation for under $100 in Gigabyte’s GA-AB350M-Gaming 3. That was the last gasp for my restraint.

Here’s a table with the full specifications of the machine:

Component type Component name New/used?
CPU AMD Ryzen 3 2200G APU with

integrated Radeon Vega 8 graphics

New
RAM Patriot PVLW416G360C6K

2x8GB DDR4-3600 16-18-18-36

New
Motherboard Gigabyte GA-AB350M-Gaming 3 New
System storage Toshiba OCZ RD400 512GB Used
Power supply Corsair CX750M semi-modular Used
Chassis Cooler Master N200 Used
Operating system Windows 10 Pro x64 N/A

Make no mistake: aside from the motherboard, this machine was cobbled together from spare parts. As a result, this machine doesn’t have a fancy name like Colton’s “Gipsy Danger,” nor is there a lot to say about my rationale behind the selection of the parts. I purchased the Cooler Master N200 a few years ago as an open-box impulse buy at Micro Center, and it’s housed many builds since. The power supply came out of my Wintendo that I recently parted out and sold off. That’s why it’s gross overkill for this build.

Even still, I don’t like paying for junk. That’s why I picked out the AB350M-Gaming 3. I’ve had nothing but good experiences with Gigabyte boards, and Newegg assured me that this board would come flashed and ready for a Ryzen 2000-series chip—and it did. Not only that, but this board—despite its $75 price tag after rebate—has enough features that I wouldn’t feel put out if I wanted to use it for a faster Ryzen CPU later. That’s a real possibility, given the impressive performance of AMD’s Pinnacle Ridge chips.

Simple and clean

When I first built the machine I just left wires going everywhere. It’s not a demanding system, so it doesn’t need much airflow, and I really never intended to leave it in the case for all that long. Even still, it admittedly looked terrible. In preparation for this article, the aforementioned friend who gave me the processor actually came over to re-do my wiring job so that it didn’t look so trashy. So thanks for that, kiddo.

With that said, there really aren’t many wires to manage. There are no SATA drives and no video card. The Corsair CX750M power supply is modular, too. In the end, the front-panel wires, the fan cables, and the two motherboard power cables are the only wires that required routing. My biggest complaint with the AB350M-Gaming 3 is probably that it only has three fan connectors. Consequently, I had to remove the 120-mm fan that Cooler Master includes with the N200 chassis, leaving behind only the two Corsair fans. That’s not exactly a problem, though, because as I said, this machine needs very little airflow.

As I continue to build machines with M.2 SSDs, I love them more and more. Never mind the killer performance of Toshiba’s RD400 NVMe SSD—what I really love about M.2 drives is the way they install directly onto the motherboard and don’t require any extra cabling. I have similar sentiments about building systems that only rely on integrated graphics, although the performance trade-off in that case is usually much more severe. That’s less the case here, though. I’ll talk about that at length here in a bit.

The linchpin in this build is surely the fantastic DDR4-3600 memory sent over by Patriot. Second-generation Ryzen chips handle fast memory better than the first-generation, but I wasn’t really surprised when the machine wouldn’t boot with the RAM configured for 3600 MT/s. Testing the RAM in my buddy’s Kaby Lake rig confirmed that it wasn’t the RAM’s fault—even the second-gen Ryzen IMC has trouble running 3600 MT/s RAM at its native speed. Installing it back into the Gigabyte-Ryzen machine, I enabled Patriot’s XMP profile, and then simply toggled the memory multiplier to 32x instead of 36x. Lo and behold, it started right up. 3200 MT/s is still quite quick, so I’m not fussed.

The A-series badge is from this case’s first-ever build.

So with minimal tweaking, I got the system set up and put Windows 10 on it. Having done this on several other machines in the few days before (using the same install medium), I was really impressed with the speed at which the Windows install proceeded. Windows Updates flew by in a flash, no doubt aided by my recent free bump to 100 Mbps download speed. Naturally, I installed Steam and 3DMark and began filling up the RD400 SSD with games in my quest to discover what exactly one can do on a Ryzen 3 2200G.

 

Doesn’t suck. -GM

As it happens, you can do quite a lot with this system. It probably doesn’t even bear mentioning for a modern quad-core machine with 16 GB of RAM and an NVMe SSD, but Windows absolutely flies on this box. Using a pair of 1920×1080 monitors, I found it quite pleasant for both work and play. This is the first Ryzen box that I’ve used for more than few minutes, and I don’t think I could pick it out in a blind test against my Core i7-4790K gaming machine.

Performance on the desktop is mostly down to your CPU and storage, though. I wasn’t really expecting a lot from this system in terms of gaming performance—even after reading Jeff’s review of the Ryzen 3 2200G. If you haven’t read his writeup, it presents a much more complete picture of the Ryzen APUs’ performance than this article. This isn’t a review, so I’ll keep it brief and subjective: it’s actually pretty darn fast. 

Obviously integrated graphics are no match for a real discrete graphics card. That said, I don’t feel shy about opining that the 2200G’s Vega 8 graphics are competent enough—at least when paired with Patriot’s fast 3200 MT/s memory—to suffice for any casual gaming workload. In the last week or so since I put the machine together, I’ve played quite a few games on it. Here’s a list of titles I’ve tested on the APU and some subjective impressions for each one:

Game title Settings Results and notes
20XX N/A Flawless 120 FPS with vsync
Bayonetta (click) Consistent performance over 54 FPS
Dark Souls III (click) Stable, if low, frame rate—slightly under 30 FPS
Demon’s Souls (RPCS3) defaults Solid 30 FPS, better than a real PS3 (build 6718)
Fortnite Battle Royale (click) Consistent 45 FPS; 70+ at 1600×900
League of Legends (click) Silky 140 FPS, dips to ≈90s in teamfights
Rise of the Tomb Raider (click) Playable 30 FPS, albeit with frequent hitches
Warframe (click) Amazingly smooth with FreeSync at 50≈85 FPS

The standouts in the above list are Demon’s Souls (running in the RPCS3 emulator), and Warframe. The little Raven Ridge chip’s performance in RPCS3 is nothing short of stellar, as the PlayStation 3 emulator is notoriously hard on CPUs. In fact, my Zotac Zbox Magnus EN1070‘s Core i5-6400T isn’t quite fast enough to handle Demon’s Souls in the emulator. Using the default settings, the Ryzen 3 2200G plays this Playstation 3 classic like it was made to do so.

Digital Extremes’ Warframe

Meanwhile, the machine’s performance in Warframe is spectacular. The game looks great with most in-game graphics settings still enabled, and flipping across maps blasting enemies is as fun as ever. Playing Warframe with FreeSync enabled on my Asus ROG XG27VQ has surely been the best gaming experience I’ve had on this machine. However, that’s in part because it’s the only game I can actually get to work with FreeSync.

Whether due to using FreeSync over HDMI, a problem with the motherboard, or perhaps some fault in AMD’s drivers, using FreeSync causes most full-screen accelerated applications to become grotesquely corrupted. The issue resolves itself immediately as soon as you return to the desktop, but it affects video players and web browsers, not just games.

Even though I won’t be using this machine hooked up to my XG27VQ very often, it’s still a little disappointing that FreeSync isn’t working properly. The usual display I have hooked up to this machine, a Lenovo L2264A, also supports FreeSync at refresh rates up to 75 Hz. Fortunately, I won’t be playing games on this machine too much since I already have a dedicated gaming PC. In fact… what am I going to be doing on this machine?

Raven without a cause

I built this machine entirely to satisfy my own curiosity about the capabilities of AMD’s Raven Ridge APUs. In that endeavor, I’ve succeeded completely. Now, I’m left with an embarrassingly-competent computer and no real need for it. It won’t go entirely to waste, though. I have a new generation of gamer chomping at the bit for her own PC, after all. While my daughter’s ULV Haswell laptop serves remarkably well as a Minecraft machine, she’s a year off from being a teenager. It’s time to step up to more serious things.

Dark Souls Remastered

Yes, indeed. Dark Souls Remastered just came out today. Maybe I should see how well it runs on this machine…

Comments closed
    • auxy
    • 1 year ago

    Can I have my 2200G back now? (‘ω’)

    Just kidding. (*’▽’) Hehe.

    Nice article. You could have mentioned me by name tho.

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      So you lent Zak your 2200G?

      If so, thanks. I guess I wouldn’t have read about this otherwise.

        • auxy
        • 1 year ago

        lol. I gave it to him. I was just joking. (‘ω’) It’s kind of an inside joke among our friends that I am notorious for lending things and then actually asking for them back whereas I guess most people “lend” things and never expect them back. I didn’t lend him the chip tho, it’s a gift. I don’t need it and it was free to me. Would be crappy of me to take it back now that (I think?) his kid has it.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 1 year ago

          [i<](i.e. giving people things on unclear terms and then asking for them back 9 months later)[/i<] [quote<]I am notorious for lending things and then actually asking for them back whereas I guess most people "lend" things and never expect them back.[/quote<]

    • Blytz
    • 1 year ago

    Thanks for the league numbers,

    now I can get my wife a laptop upgrade *cough* that I can play on when she’s not using it.

    • DPete27
    • 1 year ago

    Interesting discovery about the FreeSync over HDMI not working. Will there be a deeper dive/follow up into this?

      • Hiro_Protagonist
      • 1 year ago

      That sounds like an excellent article idea.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 1 year ago

      Lemme caution you away from reading too much into this. This is one system with one motherboard and one APU tested on two monitors with only one connection type (there’s no DP on the board.) There’s definitely not enough information here to say anything about Freesync over HDMI in general and I have used Freesync over HDMI with other hardware (R9 290X) just fine in the past. It seems like it’s probably either a motherboard (whether faulty or due to design flaw) or driver problem.

      FWIW Jeff tested a Ryzen 3 2200G at his place doing Freesync over DP and it was just fine.

        • DPete27
        • 1 year ago

        I get that.
        I don’t have enough time to search around the internet looking for others with similar issues. But with the weight of TR behind you, you might be able to get an answer back if you query AMD/Gigabyte about the issue. Clearly TR has a pretty decent relationship with Gigabyte, and AMD….well…

    • MileageMayVary
    • 1 year ago

    Any chance we can see this paired with a mid range GPU? GPU tests always use a standard and very high end CPU. Curious how this would work as a stepping stone for someone getting into PC gaming who can then add a 1050Ti or RX570 later on.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 1 year ago

      Sure, I’m interested too. I’ll see what I can cobble together. It won’t be another feature post on the front page, but I’ll reply to this comment with a forums link. I intend to write an “appendix” portion of other notes I wanted to make that just didn’t fit into this post.

    • Kretschmer
    • 1 year ago

    This is kind of interesting, but spending $200 on fast ram with a $100 processor to save $100 on a GPU like a 1030 or 550 seems a bit unbalanced.

    I’d rather assemble a stronger CPU, 8GB RAM, and a dedicated GPU for a similar price.

    Edit2: Alternative Mobo/CPU/GPU/RAM:
    B360 – $85
    8100 – $120
    8GB DDR4 2400 – $80
    GTX 1050 2GB – $140
    Total is $425

    That’s not entirely fair, as the 2200G build could be swapped out to 2x4GB, too. So it IS a good option for the cheapest builds, and this article demonstrates that GPU performance would be decent for eSports titles or the ragged edge of acceptable for more demanding games. I personally feel that the extra $80-100 for a dGPU is worth the upgrade, as a 1050 is easily twice the performance of a 2200G. Still, not everyone has budget flexibility. Compared to our options ten years ago, this is a golden era!

      • jihadjoe
      • 1 year ago

      Agreed, but Zak didn’t have to spend money on the RAM so a Ryzen APU was a good place to make good use of it.

      If I we were actually spending money on the build though, that Viper 3600MHz RAM is $225 on Newegg, whereas 8GB of 2666 is like $90 or a savings of $135. B360 boards being about equal in price to B350, I’d put $80 of that $135 into an i5-8400 and add then spend the remaining $55 + $55 more to get a GT1030 ($90 for the GDDR5 version) and a Hyper 212 ($20 with rebate). $55 more expensive but a much better build overall.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 1 year ago

        You’re not really wrong, but I don’t know that I agree.

        I don’t think the DDR4 GT1030 is an improvement over the graphics in this machine. If nothing else, it has much less memory bandwidth: 16.8GB/sec vs. 51.2GB/sec of this system’s main memory.
        While the i5-8400 is certainly a better CPU, you’re spending $55 more for the same or worse graphics performance and an arguably not-too-useful-at-this-price-point increase in multi-threaded CPU performance. I also don’t think the Hyper212 is necessary. There’s also the reduction from 16GB to 8GB of memory.

        I’m not saying that the Viper memory used in this build is a super great value, but I don’t think the combination of i5-8400 + GT 1030 DDR4 is a good competitor when the goal is budget gaming performance. If you’d said i3-8100 + GT 1030 GDDR5 then we might be on the same page. 🙂

        Personally I’d still rather have the Raven Ridge machine though, simply because I could throw it in a slimline case with a picoPSU. I may have to do that here soon…
        (There’s also the Freesync support, which is killer when it’s working, but that’s a whole other discussion.)

          • jihadjoe
          • 1 year ago

          The price I computed was for a GDDR5 GT1030, which was $90 on Newegg. I didn’t realize the i5-8400 came with a cooler lol. I guess that makes the build just $35 more expensive:

          $135 saved from RAM
          $80 goes into [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819117824<]i5-8400[/url<] ($80 more expensive than [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819113481<]R3-2200G[/url<]) = $55 remaining $90 goes into [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125973&cm_re=GeForce_GT_1030-_-14-125-973-_-Product<]GT1030 GDDR5[/url<] = +$35 over previous budget I don't think this is ideal either, but it's a viable alternative.

            • DPete27
            • 1 year ago

            You can get [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231929<]16GB DDR4-3200[/url<] for $165-$175 pretty easily if you watch for sales. If you're paying more than $200 you're either impatient or getting ripped off.

            • JustAnEngineer
            • 1 year ago

            Even if a shoestring budget dictated making your initial build with a puny 8 GiB of memory, you don’t have to spend a fortune to get reasonably fast RAM.

            [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820220941<]$81[/url<] 2x4 GiB PC4-17000 Patriot Signature DDR4-2133 15-15-15-36 [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820220976<]$86[/url<] 2x4 GiB PC4-24000 Patriot Viper 4 DDR4-3000 16-16-16-36

            • freebird
            • 1 year ago

            Yeah, I got 16GB of DDR4-3000 (OCed to 3200) CL16 for $158 tax & shipping from NewUnbornChick for my Ryzen 2200G HTPC build. Next TV will be 4K with Freesync/VRR; maybe one of these, but probably not until 2019.
            [url<]http://www.guru3d.com/news-story/samsung-2018-qled-tvs-will-support-120hz-freesync-and-vrr.html[/url<] Even without 8 threads the Ryzen 2200G is pretty snappy. I just couldn't see paying the extra $ 70-80 for the performance difference between it and the 2400G. The rather spend that $80 on decent speed 16GB that should last another CPU upgrade or two for this box. Even with an old H100i AIO cooler in my ITX build it only sips 40w Web browsing & desktop work. Stressing one or the other (CPU/GPU) about 80w and both around 100w at the wall.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 1 year ago

          If you’re going to spend money on a gaming graphics card, you should go at least as far as a Radeon RX 560 4GB or GeForce GTX1050Ti 4GB card to get enough performance to matter in modern games.

      • Anonymous Coward
      • 1 year ago

      Yeah I went through all those thoughts some time ago while speccing a upgrade, the 2200G was [i<]so cheap[/i<] it almost felt like a false savings. I wonder if AMD shouldn't think about ways to justify a higher end APU, the lower end of things is in "why bother" territory. IMO.

      • Alexko
      • 1 year ago

      Yeah, current RAM prices are really hurting AMD’s value proposition. I don’t know when the situation will finally improve, but I’m guessing that a future 7nm APU with more CUs (16? or 7++/5nm with 24 CUs?), better bandwidth efficiency, and cheap DDR5 running at some 4200 MT/s could make for pretty great budget builds.

        • Anonymous Coward
        • 1 year ago

        The concept of value proposition is being distorted for sure. They would do well if they had an APU with a significant local RAM cache of some kind. Costs more to fab, yes, but there’s not a lot of point in selling a super cheap CPU right now, in significant parts of the market.

        • JustAnEngineer
        • 1 year ago

        PC4-25600 prices aren’t much higher than slow old PC4-19200 if you don’t demand ultra low timings to go with the DDR4-3200 speed.

          • jihadjoe
          • 1 year ago

          Ryzen thrives on both bandwidth and low latencies though. That’s the problem with AMD’s lower-end stuff: they’re cheap, but the architecture demands fast/expensive memory.

      • dragontamer5788
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]8GB DDR4 2400 - $80[/quote<] +$20 gets you DDR4 3200MT/s CAS16: [url<]https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231900[/url<] This is better at 16GB, because $160 gets you 16GB of DDR 3200MT/s CAS16: [url<]https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231977[/url<] So at 16GB target at least, you don't really save any money going slower than 3200 MT/s CAS16 (which is really just factory-overclocked RAM at 1.35V instead of 1.2V). ------------ Once you cross the CAS == 1/200th the MT/s, then RAM gets outrageously more expenisve. The 1/200th metric (CAS 16 @ 3200, or CAS 15 @ 3000, etc. etc.) is basically the boundary between cheaper Hynix dies and expensive Samsung B-dies. Only Samsung B-Die gets to CAS14 @ 3200. Buy Hynix for cheap price/performance. Samsung B-dies for maximum overclock and compatibility (but definitely a major $$$ increase)

        • MOSFET
        • 1 year ago

        Nicely put.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 1 year ago

      [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231884<]$155[/url<] 2x8 GiB PC4-17000 G.Skill Ripjaws V DDR4-2133, 15-15-15-35 [url=https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231977<]$165[/url<] 2x8 GiB PC4-25600 G.Skill Ripjaws V DDR4-3200, 16-18-18-38 The memory that runs at 50% higher frequency and has 30% lower latency costs 6½% more than the slow stuff. Spending that extra $10 on RAM is a pretty small difference compared to the cost of a graphics card.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 1 year ago

    Nice writeup on your super-budget gaming system, and it’s great to see what it’s capable of doing in games that are kind of outside the realm of normal reviews.

    It DOES make me question my purchase of the 2400G instead of the cheaper CPU, if only a little. In particular, your results in Fartnite. That rig is right on the heels of my setup, which has DDR4-3000 but Vega 11. A decent trade-off. I guess I’m getting enough out of the RAM that the extra GPU power isn’t going to waste.

    Super news about RPCS3, though. I still have my PS3 Super Slim, but if it bites a big one it’s nice to know that I don’t necessarily need to replace it. I just need a BD-ROM, and the requisite storage space to hold onto disc images. I only ever play the Disgaea series (both PS2 classics and PS3 entrants in the series) on it these days, anyway, and I’m sure that’s less demanding that Demon’s Souls.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 1 year ago

      It probably bears mentioning that I’ve never been in a big engagement in Fortnite BR, haha. I usually am one of the first ones eliminated, in fact. I dunno, I’m not cut out for Battle Royale games it seems. I can hold my own (and rise to the top) in a more traditional deathmatch, but in big open games like PUBG, FortniteBR, and even stuff like Battlefield 3 and ARMA, I’m useless.

      Too many years spent crawling tight corridors in Doom, I guess. 🙂

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        Ditto. If I see more than two or three people, it’s because I got good at hiding or they didn’t notice me.

    • elites2012
    • 1 year ago

    nice review. Thank you for not putting that rgb rainbow bright crap in the system. the white ram cooler was just fine!

      • RAGEPRO
      • 1 year ago

      Haha, yeah I think it looks nice too. Thanks for commenting.

    • Chrispy_
    • 1 year ago

    There’s a lot of Nvidiot hate towards [i<]inferior[/i<] Freesync displays but when you can get VRR for nothing, and your GPU (or IGP) was never going to achieve 144fps in the first place, it suddenly makes a whole world of sense. Given that Nvidia's most popular GPU by sales figures in 2017 was the 1050 2GB, it's hard to see why they lock VRR behind the G-Sync paywall and deprive budget gamers out of what is probably the biggest single technological improvement to displays in the last two decades.

      • YukaKun
      • 1 year ago

      Not playing Devil’s advocate, but…

      My particular beef with most Freesync Monitors is not the higher limit, but the lower. I went with an AOC G2460PF (Freesync, 35-144 range) that had a low enough refresh to make the experience good and it shows, comparably, to my lappy with a 1070 and GSync (45-60). You DO notice when it goes out of range in the lower band and it bothers you to no end, haha. Well, I’m being unfair with the lappy, but you get my point (I hope).

      Cheers!

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        I know what you mean, but don’t think of it as a deficiency of bare-minimum Freesync compared to a G-Sync, Freesync2, or Freesync(1)LFC solutio; Think of it as a totally-free improvement over fixed-60Hz displays.

        Yeah, that panel was never going to support LFC, but at least you don’t have to put up with a stuttery mess at 45-60Hz. That alone is why you will never disable Freesync – even in its WORST possible form, it’s a huge improvement over fixed-refresh.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 1 year ago

          I mean, except for when it turns every game into a gross tutti-frutti mess. That’s a problem.
          [quote<]That alone is why you will never disable Freesync - even in its WORST possible form, it's a huge improvement over fixed-refresh.[/quote<]

            • Chrispy_
            • 1 year ago

            I actually kind of skim-read that paragraph in your review, but it sounds like these Ryzen APUs have some kind of Freesync bug that needs patching still.

            I’ve never seen Freesync screw up before, and these IGPs are More Polaris than Vega, right? Clearly the drivers are a work in progress in some areas 🙁

            • RAGEPRO
            • 1 year ago

            Check [url=https://techreport.com/discussion/33691/building-a-basic-gaming-pc-with-amd-ryzen-3-2200g?post=1079539<]my reply to DPete27 over here[/url<] for a little more info.

            • Chrispy_
            • 1 year ago

            Yeah, but [i<]geometry[/i<] corruption - that's all kinds of new and messed up!

      • K-L-Waster
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]There's a lot of Nvidiot hate towards inferior Freesync displays but when you can get VRR for nothing, and your GPU (or IGP) was never going to achieve 144fps in the first place, it suddenly makes a whole world of sense. [/quote<] Except when, y'know, *it only works on one game.*

      • rechicero
      • 1 year ago

      Because they dominate the market right now and they know every one that buys today a G-Sync monitor is going to be their customer for many years to come, without any other choice. With that they don’t even need superior product to keep the dominance. It’s a great move… for them.

    • dodozoid
    • 1 year ago

    Kudos to your parenting… I am really looking forward to my own daughter being old enough to game so I have a reason to keep my PC up to date.

    • dragontamer5788
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]The linchpin in this build is surely the fantastic DDR4-3600 memory sent over by Patriot. Second-generation Ryzen chips handle fast memory better than the first-generation, but I wasn't really surprised when the machine wouldn't boot with the RAM configured for 3600 MT/s. Testing the RAM in my buddy's Kaby Lake rig confirmed that it wasn't the RAM's fault—even the second-gen Ryzen IMC has trouble running 3600 MT/s RAM at its native speed. Installing it back into the Gigabyte-Ryzen machine, I enabled Patriot's XMP profile, and then simply toggled the memory multiplier to 32x instead of 36x. Lo and behold, it started right up. 3200 MT/s is still quite quick, so I'm not fussed.[/quote<] I pretty much looked for this paragraph as soon as I saw the specs. I was like, 3600 MT/s on Ryzen2 ??? Oh... wait. It didn't boot. 3400 MT/s seems to be the typical limit, and 3200 MT/s is safe. I personally have been recommending CAS16 3200 MT/s since its at a very good price/performance point right now (well, as good as any DDR4 anyway). 3600 MT/s CAS16 are some killer specifications however. Its a shame that Ryzen 2 can't handle it however. I'd personally put more effort to try to get to 3400 MT/s though, because rumor is that's the best that Ryzen's infinity fabric can run at. AMD's iGPU really wants the RAM to be as fast as possible. And AMD's CPU / Ryzen design also benefits from high-speed RAM. ------ Thanks for the review and thanks for the tests! Its always good to push the limits and see the best of what these various components can do.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 1 year ago

      Yeah, I feel like I could probably set it to 34x and have it “just work”. I’ll give that a whirl here in a bit.
      [quote<] I'd personally put more effort to try to get to 3400 MT/s though, because rumor is that's the best that Ryzen's infinity fabric can run at. [/quote<]

      • DoomGuy64
      • 1 year ago

      A nitpick, but are the APUs really “Ryzen2”? I thought they were only a slightly updated Ryzen1 with integrated graphics. That’s why 3600 doesn’t work. AMD hasn’t released Ryzen 2 with graphics just yet, but I bet the newer memory controller would indeed allow 3600 and slightly improved performance.

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