Microsoft’s Windows 10 October 2018 Update reviewed

Incredibly, five months have passed us by since the last major update of Windows 10 was released. The April update had a lot of potential, but it wasn’t obvious if all the improvements would pay off as Microsoft desired. We’ve had a bit of time with that update’s features, though, and their usefulness is becoming clearer. Now, it’s time for you all to gather round and hear the thoughts of the King of the TR sweatshop regarding the shiny new Windows 10 features in the officially named “Windows 10 October 2018 Update.”

This quietly released build is numbered Windows 10 version 1809, for those interested. The update contains some significant changes to the core user experience as well as smaller features which improve the operating system in subtle ways. It’s actually quite a substantial update, and we’re going to cover the most important items. Without further ado, let the dissertation begin!

Explorer

One of the first things you’ll likely notice is that dark themes have continued their conquest of computing, and Windows Explorer is now sporting a stylish shadowy theme. It looks good and will be automatically applied based on your system settings for light or dark themes. It’s the same Explorer you know and love, but darker! The long- rumored UWP Explorer is still MIA, though.

I need more hard drive space. Or fewer games.

Before any of you decide to throw down in the comments, yes, like most small children, I quite like flashy colors; I admit it. Unfortunately, the desktop OneDrive app currently doesn’t have a dark theme, and apparently one isn’t planned. macOS will be getting OneDrive with Batman styling, however. If you desire night-time consistency, Macs, not Windows PCs, will be providing it for the foreseeable future.

Snipping tool

The screen-capturing Snipping Tool will be going away at some point in the near future. There’s now a new “Snip and Sketch” app meant to replace it, as well as an entirely new Windows UI for taking screenshots. Snip and Sketch is a hybrid capture and inking application. You can take your screenshots and edit them within the application, as opposed to opening them in Paint or whichever other application you use.

I’ve loved TR ever since I co-founded it. Ahem.

The UI design is very similar to Paint 3D’s, though it’s more useful for annotations than creating art. Don’t expect any super-fancy editing features here. You can also set your keyboard’s Print-Screen button to bring up the Snip and Sketch app with just a toggle in Settings. This new screen-capturing process is excellent. It was significantly faster to gather the screenshots for this piece than it has been the past. You did well with this new feature, Microsoft.

Game bar

Game bar has been updated again and now includes a far superior UI that includes controls for selecting specific audio settings for different applications. You might recall I wasn’t a fan of the prior design, and thankfully the annoying notification advertising the feature is gone. The Game Bar is now accessible in the Start menu as an app, too.

Stylish and useful features! Currently lacking the promised performance graphs though.

In an earlier build, the Game Bar temporarily included a handy Performance section with RAM, GPU, CPU, and FPS data. Therein resided a “Dedicate Resources” toggle that would reduce unnecessary background system activity and give resource priority to a running game. However, Microsoft pulled this feature back after a period of testing. Despite that omission, I think the changes to the Game Bar are positive, and I’m looking forward to seeing what the Microsoft engineers do with it. 

 

Cloud clipboard syncing and SwiftKey

This release finally brings something I’ve wanted for years and that Microsoft has been working on for almost as long as I’ve been pining for it, and it’s finally here: cloud clipboard synchronization! Now you can cut and paste text across devices and access a cloud-saved clipboard history with Windows+V. Right now, the feature is Windows-only, but Android and iOS support is incoming to Microsoft’s SwiftKey keyboard in those operating systems.

“What’s a SwiftKey keyboard,” many of you ask? Microsoft bought the SwiftKey company a few years ago, and it’s finally brought its typing technology over to Windows. For those lucky enough to have their default Windows settings set to a few specific language regions, Windows now has a SwiftKey-powered on-screen keyboard. The on-screen keyboard now supports swiping, and the predictions should be quite a bit better than on previous Windows incarnations.

For now, the new keyboard is available for those using: English (United States), English (United Kingdom), French (France), German (Germany), Italian (Italy), Spanish (Spain), Portuguese (Brazil), and Russian locales. Those of us in Canada (and many other places) look on with envy at your superior tablet typing, but I just can’t give up properly using the letter “u” when spelling words like “colour” or “labour.” Also, what is a “liter?”

Your Phone

“Your Phone” is possibly the biggest feature update of this build. It’s a new app that brings cross-platform integration between smartphones and Windows PCs, but what that integration entails depends on your phone platform. On Android (7.0 and later) you can send and view SMS messages (though MMS media or RCS texts aren’t yet supported), and you can view the most recent pictures on your phone. Your PC can’t otherwise interact with those photos, though, and the app will just make temporary copies for you to use on your computer. In order to use this feature, you need Your Phone installed and configured on both Android and Windows 10.

That setup process turned out to be more difficult than it should be for me. I have not been able to get it to work consistently with my OnePlus 5t. I tried every troubleshooting step many times, experimented with three different PCs, and even did a complete reset of my phone. I also downgraded to Android 8.0 as a last-ditch effort, and as you can guess, that didn’t help. I did get the phone connected once, but it wouldn’t connect again. My wife’s LG G5 connected without issue, but only to my PC, and wouldn’t hook up to hers. I’ve sent many emails back and forth with Microsoft engineers trying to troubleshoot the issue, and they think something funny is up with my DNS. After trying numerous other fixes, I still couldn’t get Your Phone going.

On iOS, Microsoft doesn’t have the ability to implement many Your Phone features compared to what’s possible on Android. Currently, all you can do is send links from Edge on iOS to Windows. There’s no SMS or photo library integration. Microsoft states that Your Phone on iOS grants you “cross-device experiences,” but the existing integration is actually tied to other applications. Timeline data syncing exists on Edge, and the cloud clipboard is SwiftKey-based, but neither feature needs a “Your Phone” configuration. When speaking to Shilpa Ranganathan (Microsoft General Manager of mobile product experiences), she couched her language carefully but couldn’t say what features you gain by linking an Apple device with Your Phone. In other words, as of today, the app seems to do next to nothing with iOS.

At the Surface event on October 2, Microsoft demoed complete Android phone mirroring on PC, showing a user opening and replying to Snapchat on a Windows machine without ever touching their phone. The mirroring and app integrations will be interesting features when they launch, but they didn’t make it into this update, and I wouldn’t be surprised if they miss the next Windows update. The future of “cross-platform experiences” with Windows is just getting started, at best.

I’m not currently impressed with the “Your Phone” feature as it stands, since I can’t get the darn thing working with Android, and it currently does almost nothing on iOS. I’ll need to see significant improvements to recommend it. Luckily for everyone, it’s not the only new feature in this update.

Search and Cortana

The Search and Cortana sections of Windows have seen significant changes with every new version, and we’re finally seeing serious usability improvements compared to heavily-criticized past versions. There’s now a double-wide panel for searches—a UI change that matches Cortana’s last update. You can clearly specify what you’re looking for: files, apps, emails, documents, settings, photos, or web pages. The new second panel shows a preview of the matches, whether that’s Bing results (which I think are actually pretty solid), file details, or settings.

I find the second panel very useful, as it’s much faster to quickly pull up a Wikipedia page, image search, or just to check some random data compared to opening a browser first. Cortana recently lost the ability to track packages, though, so if you appreciated that info, you’ll now need to look for it in Windows Mail. Otherwise, Cortana hasn’t changed all that much since the April Update.

 

Windows Update

Making grandmothers happy globally (and other people who defer updates forever), Windows now uses machine learning to figure out when to do updates that require a restart. Essentially, the OS will monitor when and how you use it in order to figure out the best time for a restart. Hopefully this means more updates applied with fewer tears.

Those worried about how this data is collected, analyzed, and stored should know that the telemetry is cloud-based, though Microsoft isn’t entirely clear on what information stays on its servers, if any. The company does provide an app called the Diagnostic Data Viewer that shows exactly what telemetry data a machine collects. The viewer gained some additional filtering after the October 2018 update, and you can find it in the Microsoft Store.

Edge

Much like with every Windows update, Microsoft brought some new refinements to Edge. The menu under the ellipsis button has been completely redesigned and seems to be more intuitive. Edge also gained the ability to restrict specific sites from auto-playing videos. You can configure the browser on a per-URL basis to either automatically play videos normally, play them muted, or block them entirely. The Jump List (the one that pops when you right-click Edge in the taskbar) now will list your most-visited sites. There are additional labeling options for set aside tabs that you’re saving for later, too.

Edge has much better menus now

Edge now has support for FIDO U2F security keys. Hopefully that’s the start of the end of passwords. Personally, I’m awfully tired of constantly reminding my family what their passwords are. There are a few other UI adjustments. Microsoft’s Acrylic material style continues to advance in both Edge and Windows. One of my favorite changes with the October update is that PDF files (opened by default by Edge) now have a proper PDF icon in Explorer rather than the browser’s “e.”

Highlighting words when using Edge as an e-book reader will now automatically search that word’s definition. That’s a small change, but a handy one. Overall, Edge continues to work pretty well, and I recommend that most regular users try it. It’s a decent and stylish browser.

Other bits and bobs

There are several other features rounding out this update that merit mention. Whereas in the past HDR settings were configured by your GPU vendor’s control panel, they’re now included directly in Windows Settings. There’s also automatic brightness adjustment for video if your machine has an ambient light sensor.  You might notice I lack a compatible HDR monitor, so please, if you’re rushing to make a GoFundMe page to correct this travesty, just check if someone else already made one and donate there. That’ll make collecting my funds easier. Remember I have a Nvidia graphics card, so the monitor must have G-Sync support as well. It won’t be cheap, so give generously!

Task Manager saw another upgrade and can now show application-specific power usage along with power usage trends. That data isn’t all that useful on a plugged-in desktop, but on a low-power machine such as my wife’s new Surface Go (which is a fantastic device) it could provide some guidance on why the heck the battery is draining quicker than you’d like. Windows Defender has been renamed to Windows Security, and the icons therein have been subtly tweaked. It’s become a full-featured and easy-to-use security platform, and I can’t imagine most people need anything more.

The look of some emoji have been adjusted slightly, and there’s now support for Unicode 11 and its new super-fun emojis for all you texting teenagers out there. You can also see battery levels for Bluetooth devices that broadcast that info, like the Microsoft Surface Pen. Once you’re finished texting your omg bffs about your darn parents you can easily check to see if your Bluetooth headphones are charged before you flop on the bed and imagine you’re a grown-up and can do what you want.

OneDrive got smarter with this build and will automatically move locally saved files to on-demand cloud storage if they’re not accessed in a while. I can see this possibly being a problem for some users, but it’ll clear up some hard drive space for others. I think whether or not this feature survives will depend on how many people end up without internet access when they need a file that they thought was saved locally.

Kiosk mode, which permits an extremely locked-down Windows environment with only one app, has received a new setup experience. You can also adjust the size of text for most things in Windows with the new “Make Text Bigger” slider in Settings. That slider works independently from the “Make Everything Bigger” scaling, too, allowing for extra customization.

There are a few bonuses for those users who love Linux and its cousins. Notepad has seen a couple of improvements and now includes line character support. That should let users open and view text files created in Linux without formatting errors. Notepad now has Bing search and a zoom function, too. All told, that’s a surprising amount of improvements all at once for a program that still looks straight out of 1993.

Additionally, you can now open a Bash shell from anywhere in Explorer if you have it installed. Copy and paste shortcuts in a Bash Shell can now be set to Ctrl+Shift+C and Ctrl+Shift+V, too, increasing consistency for those who routinely wrangle different flavors of terminals. While these subtle changes are unlikely to matter to 99.9% of users, developers, sysadmins, and tinkerers will likely appreciate them.

The last few noteworthy features are as follows: the Registry Editor now auto-fills an address as you’re typing it. Wireless projection controls are improved with a new bar along the top, similar to the UI for Remote Desktop. Lastly, Focus Assist, the do-not-disturb mode of Windows 10, does a better job of detecting games, including those using the OpenGL and Vulkan APIs.

 

Conclusion

This October update is generally full of features which work well today, my issues with “Your Phone” excepted. Most of the new stuff falls into a general quality-of-use category. Whether it’s the HDR settings or the new Emoji, or perhaps the tweaks to the dark theme and the new snipping functionality, the improvements will offer a better Windows experience. Microsoft’s best operating system is becoming more and more consistent, and I encountered no issues installing this build on any of my devices. In my opinion, this update is likely my favorite for Windows 10 so far, and I really didn’t expect that going into this. Windows 10 continues to get smarter, faster, and more stable. I deem it highly recommended.

Although people still aren’t downloading many PWA applications, there’s a lot of software being built with this API. The upcoming Windows Insider app will be PWA-based, and Twitter will likely be replacing its current desktop website with the PWA version as the default. The company has made that change on mobile devices. Google is moving in the PWA direction as well, seeing as its Maps, Photos, Contacts, and Plus are PWA apps, and more are on the way. Tinder’s app load time was cut in half by switching to PWA, and the maker claims the app now has higher engagement, too. Many other companies claim similar results. The future of PWAs looks bright.

Anecdotally, Timeline, the application-history feature, isn’t used at all by the people I asked about it. I and the people I talk to continue to Alt+Tab exclusively. Most folks I asked had forgotten it was even there. For me, that’s not a great sign, and Microsoft needs to tweak the feature to make it more useful.

Full Timeline support will be launching on Android in the next few weeks, and it already exists in the Microsoft Launcher Beta. That should let Android users continue to browse and edit documents back-and-forth between Android and Windows. I’d love to hear in the comments whether you use Timeline, and if you’ve used or have interest in cross-platform functionality between Windows and mobile OSes.

We’ve continued to see Microsoft’s push to augment handsets since the terrible and horrible death of Windows Phones. I’m not sure whether the Android community at large is really picking Microsoft’s apps, but they’re worth checking out. From Microsoft Launcher to OneNote they generally work well, and they’re easily among the best apps on the platform. I look forward to a decent Microsoft Photos app for Android eventually. The increasing integration with Windows PCs makes those apps more attractive, too. We have to wait and see whether that’ll be enough for Microsoft to win new business on the mobile side.

Sweatshopking

I WRITE ON THE TECH REPORT ABOUT ALL THE IMPORTANT STUFF YOU WANNA READ

Comments closed
    • LoneWolf15
    • 1 year ago

    [i<]The long- rumored UWP Explorer is still MIA, though.[/i<] Pardon me, but who would WANT Explorer to be UWP? Heck, I still use Win+R then type in "Control" a lot of the time as I can't stand "Settings" dumbing everything down and hiding the crap I want. Making things be part of/require the whole Windows Store platform is just gonna pizzle on my shizzle.

    • DevilsCanyonSoul
    • 1 year ago

    MS screwed up big time with 1803 and 1809. It looks like the attrition factor is finally showing it’s effect. I mean seriously, Fast Ring feedback showed file deletion reports and MS released 1809 anyway? Very sad turn of events to have consecutive major updates go so wrong in the same year.

    • UnknownZA
    • 1 year ago

    Microsoft pulled the update I see. I was wondering why I didn’t have it.

    [url<]https://www.zdnet.com/article/microsoft-pulls-windows-10-october-update-version-1809/[/url<]

      • LoneWolf15
      • 1 year ago

      Yeah that “We massively b0rk your data” bug was kind of a showstopper.

    • BillyBuerger
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]Windows now uses machine learning to figure out when to do updates that require a restart. [/quote<] No, Microsoft, just no. The problem is not you guessing when a good time to restart is. The problem is letting ME tell you when to restart. I don't care if you want to bug me every day that you need to restart to update. You should NEVER reboot without me saying so. Just because you can use AI, doesn't mean you should.

      • Voldenuit
      • 1 year ago

      As always, there is [url=https://xkcd.com/2054/<]a relevant xkcd[/url<].

    • dragosmp
    • 1 year ago

    Dark theme is awesome. I’m getting this feeling that Windows is such an ancient OS and a thing like the dark theme brings it closer to where Android was 2 years ago. It is progress, but win feel still so far behind.

    In no specific order, I’d like MS to:
    * cut it off with this stupid 6 month minuscule, yet total upgrade. Surely a 50 MB patch would have sufficed for the plethora of features we got
    * make it easier to share things by email or apps. Like click a picture/share/whatsapp/send boom 10s later job done.
    * one stop saloon for privacy settings (that actually work, see 3rd party cookies in edge). None of that User Policy digging to disable all sorts of telemetry. This hiding of things makes you wonder what they’re looking to hide, even if they may not be doing anything nefarious
    * consistent UI for OS’ stock apps, for example Task Manager doesn’t do Dark theme

    BTW, it didn’t delete anything, it works smoothly.

      • rnalsation
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<]... a thing like the dark theme brings it closer to where Android was 2 years ...[/quote<] Yeah, 2 years ago. Go ahead and update the Google calculator and watch it go from grey to white. And with the "Material" layout when an app is white the notification bar is white too! OH, and there is no color choice for the calculator.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        A mistake on Google’s part, for sure. They’er starting to slowly fix that, though. The Messages and Phone apps now have light/dark toggles. Hopefully they’ll keep at it.

        Phone requires a device that uses the stock Google app. Messages can be installed on any recent Android phone.

          • rnalsation
          • 1 year ago

          The app was in a dark mode, then they updated it to remove the dark mode.
          Also, Google has been pretty bad at fixing things without public pressure lately. The spell check for Gboard has been broken for nearly all of 2018

      • Froz
      • 1 year ago

      [quote<] * make it easier to share things by email or apps. Like click a picture/share/whatsapp/send boom 10s later job done.[/quote<] That exists since... forever? Right click > send to > whatever. Apps can add themselves to the list (no idea about whatsapp, but Skype and Dropbox for example do that).

    • joselillo_25
    • 1 year ago

    I cannot use the swype keyboard, are you sure is active in this release?

    • rnalsation
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]Notepad now has Bing search ...[/quote<] So where is the patch to install an older version of notepad without this *string of expletives deleted* Really, why would anyone want Notepad to be anything other than basic text. If you want more there is a whole plethora of text editors for any purpose, including WordPad. You remeber WordPad, the not quite Word but more features than Notepad, text editor.

      • BillyBuerger
      • 1 year ago

      Yeah, I was happy when I heard Notepad was updated. I assumed it meant it might actually be useful for some… um… text editing… for a change. Bing search was not what I was expecting. I’ll continue ignoring it and get angry when it comes up on some PC that I didn’t set Scite to by default editor on.

        • Chrispy_
        • 1 year ago

        Notepad++

        I don’t know what hardcore txt editing people do, I’m not really hardcore enough, apparently. Notepad++ certainly has everything I wished Notepad to do, without being anything more than a plain-text editor.

          • Redocbew
          • 1 year ago

          Notepad++ is what I always used on Windows before I found Atom. The thing that made Notepad useful wasn’t that it had a ton of features. It had virtually none at all, but if you needed to edit your hosts file or make some other tiny change in some config file and the machine didn’t have something like Notepad++ installed, then notepad was really all you needed. It was useful because it didn’t have a ton of stupid features that only got in the way, but I guess that’s no longer the case.

          I suppose I should be replying to BillyBuerger, but this is just one of those things that makes me wonder what’s going on in Redmond these days. If even poor, sad, little notepad is being made into a selling point I wonder what the priorities are for the rest of the system.

      • Chrispy_
      • 1 year ago

      Feature creep is Microsoft’s signature move.

      Did you want an OS?
      Nope, now it’s a [i<]Lifestyle targeted-marketing content discovery online service cache with x86 compatibility[/i<] Did you want a plain text editor? Nope. Sorry. Now it's a web-browser with non-changeable default search engine set to Microsoft Yahoo!

    • Valiant1
    • 1 year ago

    So the question all of us who aren’t cutting or bleeding edge (I am a little too poor to be cutting edge and way to scared to be bleeding edge) are wondering is, should I bother getting this update before it’s foisted on me like an unwanted brother in law who lives in your spare room for too long? For someone who doesn’t really do a whole lot of article creation am I going to find that much improvement? Don’t get me wrong. I am all for installing updates if I think it will help me. But is this one that you guys are feeling is gonna be worth that extra step of clicking “enable previews” (or whatever it is called now) I DO like the neon green and I think it will annoy my family into using my computer less. But I jumped on that sad old ship that was windows phone just in time to see everyone else drowning around me but too late to get off in time to avoid being dragged under myself, so the your phone doesn’t help me all that much. Whats the opinion guys? Install or don’t? And thanks for the advice either way 😀

      • sweatshopking
      • 1 year ago

      It doesn’t require enable previews, it was a general release.
      I say was, because it has been pulled.

      • tipoo
      • 1 year ago

      Yes, I’ve been more interested in performance tests between major builds rather than most of the new features added, but I don’t really find much in the way of them. Same on macOS between major titled versions for that matter. I’m more interested in keeping an eye on performance regression, I seem to recall early Windows 10 handling older systems particularly with HDDs better than it does now.

      • LoneWolf15
      • 1 year ago

      Answer is no. Delay for 1-2 months until they fix the massive bug-hive it is.

    • yeeeeman
    • 1 year ago

    You forgot about the best feature of this new update: “Automatic delete of all files inside My Documents folder”. [url<]https://www.theverge.com/2018/10/5/17940902/microsoft-windows-10-october-2018-update-deleting-documents-issues[/url<] I didn't disable automatic updates until now, but I have gave it a thought once or twice. Now I NEED to disable it, since MS is BS-ing us.

    • DoomGuy64
    • 1 year ago

    Windows 10 October update is the Best, the best, the best, the best, the best.

    *Presses reset button since the OS and audio system is obviously locked up.

    • ron_nelson
    • 1 year ago

    Also, Windows Mixed Reality got some nice improvements. The biggest is the ability to directly launch SteamVR programs, so no more needing to bounce from Windows Cliff House to Steam Home to launch.

    Also, Edge (and other Microsoft apps that probably use Edge like the Store) will claim your internet connection is broken if you do not have IPv6 enabled for the network interface.

    • setaG_lliB
    • 1 year ago

    TRUTH BE TOLD, I WOULD RATHER USE AMIGAOS. WINDOWS 10 SIMPLY WILL NOT INITIALIZE MY VIDEO TOASTER. IT HAS GOT ME SINGING THE BLUES.

      • psuedonymous
      • 1 year ago

      Does Windows 10 get your gurus meditating?

    • Phartindust
    • 1 year ago

    Maybe I missed it, but I didn’t see any mention of DXR. Are you saving that for it’s own article?

    • reckless76
    • 1 year ago

    So, where is this option that lets me bind Snip and Sketch to the print screen key? That actually sounds useful, but I can’t find it.

      • drfish
      • 1 year ago

      Keyboard settings -> Print Screen shortcut

      It’s great!

        • reckless76
        • 1 year ago

        Ah, thank you!
        I was looking for a settings button in the Snip app, so I was never going to find it.

    • synthtel2
    • 1 year ago

    The Explorer dark theme will be nice. Other than that, meh.

    I can’t wait to figure out what they managed to break on my system this time.

    • chuckula
    • 1 year ago

    Hrmm… well my main Arch Linux OS SSD just died yesterday and I’ll need to install a new OS.

    So maybe I should jump on Windows 10 October Edition with all these “free” space-consuming apps I don’t want!

    .
    .
    .
    .
    .

    BWHAAHAHAA! Sorry, I couldn’t pull that off with a straight face.

    • Krogoth
    • 1 year ago

    I think that I just heard the cries and curses of thousands of IT Admins at once.

      • Voldenuit
      • 1 year ago

      IT Admins would/should have delayed feature updates for internal testing anyway.

      It’s going to be scores of Grandmas and Moms that will lose their income tax returns and nekkid pictures of Justin Trudeau.

    • End User
    • 1 year ago

    2 out of 3 updates worked. One PC kept blue screening during the update process. After a couple of attempts Windows Update indicated that the update was installed but the update process never completed and the update had not installed. I had to switch over to Fast Insider Builds before Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18252 (19H1) updated successfully.

    • sweatshopking
    • 1 year ago

    It’s working for somebody.
    [url<]https://www.neowin.net/news/android-users-embrace-windows-10-as-the-your-phone-companion-tops-charts-on-the-play-store[/url<]

      • drfish
      • 1 year ago

      Works great on my Lumia Icon. Oh wait…

        • sweatshopking
        • 1 year ago

        You can already share websites back and forth and text from your pc. That’s mostly all this is.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]One of the first things you'll likely notice is that dark themes have continued their conquest of computing, and Windows Explorer is now sporting a stylish shadowy theme. It looks good and will be automatically applied based on your system settings for light or dark themes. [/quote<] You mean like themes from Windows 98? I had Windows 98 Plus! and it installed all sorts of Windows Explorer themes. Microsoft just finally brought this feature back is all. 😆

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 1 year ago

      I loved the mods for Win98. I had mine set to 1-click file opening and thought it was the bomb. I don’t remember fondly all the times the desktop crashed though.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 1 year ago

        Neither do I. I’m glad that’s not a feature that’s been brought forward. 😆

          • K-L-Waster
          • 1 year ago

          Uhhhmmmm….

          [url<]https://techreport.com/news/34153/report-bug-in-windows-10-october-2018-update-might-delete-user-data[/url<]

            • derFunkenstein
            • 1 year ago

            Mother f….

    • Voldenuit
    • 1 year ago

    Not mention of the troubles people have encountered with FU2 (my unofficial name for 1809), like [url=https://www.zdnet.com/google-amp/article/windows-10-october-update-problems-wiped-docs-plus-intel-driver-warning/<]Windows wiping My Documents and My Pictures from people's hard drives[/url<], or [url=https://www.techpowerup.com/248230/windows-10-oct-2018-update-process-runs-aground-with-certain-intel-processors-fix-released<]power drain on intel systems with outdated drivers[/url<]?

      • derFunkenstein
      • 1 year ago

      Yikes, deleting files in an upgrade is never cool. Hope everybody has always-on backups going to an external drive. I love File History in Windows 10 and Time Machine in macOS for just that reason. They’ve both saved my bacon.

      • danny e.
      • 1 year ago

      “we’re trying to encourage our users to use our backup solution One Drive”

      • sweatshopking
      • 1 year ago

      This piece was written before these issues were known. I didn’t encounter any bugs or issues on my devices, your phone aside, and that’s what was mentioned in the piece.

        • End User
        • 1 year ago

        I hope they piece it together.

        Peace.

    • kvndoom
    • 1 year ago

    [quote<]Anecdotally, Timeline, the application-history feature, isn't used at all by the people I asked about it. I and the people I talk to continue to Alt+Tab exclusively.[/quote<] Windows 10 April 2019 Update: [b<]Legacy[/b<] Alt+Tab keyboard shortcut has been removed.

    • DeadOfKnight
    • 1 year ago

    That neon green…my eyes…

      • drfish
      • 1 year ago

      It’s even brighter than the green of all the upvotes you’re going to get.

        • sweatshopking
        • 1 year ago

        HEY YOU BOYZ. YOU’RE JUST TOO OLD TO APPRECIATE MY SWEET STYLING

          • drfish
          • 1 year ago

          The last time I chose something that bright, it was the shoelaces on my TMNT sneakers.

            • sweatshopking
            • 1 year ago

            See? BACK WHEN YOU WERE COOL

      • superjawes
      • 1 year ago

      If your eyes are neon green, you probably want to have that looked at.

      • morphine
      • 1 year ago

      Yes, now imagine having to edit the frickin’ piece and be greeted with that for hours on end…

      I need effin’ hazard pay.

        • sweatshopking
        • 1 year ago

        Listen here, at least I didn’t include my neon green background this time!

          • Redocbew
          • 1 year ago

          The horror…

      • thedosbox
      • 1 year ago

      Yeah, TR should have someone else take the screenshots for future reviews.

      • MOSFET
      • 1 year ago

      Microsoft is showing their [b<]12 [/b<] spirit. Go Hawks!

      • jihadjoe
      • 1 year ago

      Let’s petition MS to bring back the “Hot Dog Stand” color scheme.

      • LoneWolf15
      • 1 year ago

      That’s the green of the High Contrast Win3.x theme, isn’t it?

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