Forza Horizon 4 reviewed

For anyone who enjoys racing games, the Forza franchise is likely well-known by now. The games in the series have received accolades for years, though they were limited to Xbox consoles until just recently. 2005’s Forza Motorsport was designed as a simulation racer to compete with Sony’s Gran Turismo series, but the franchise has since branched off to satisfy two different types of gamers.

The Forza Motorsport games are for those looking for the serious stuff, and casual gamers can enjoy the open-world racing concept with the Forza Horizon titles. The Horizon games retain options for some simulation-level controls should you desire them, but they also have some absurd courses and more levity than the mainline games. Forza Horizon 4 launched recently, and it brings a number of improvements to an already-excellent series.  

Take four on the Horizon concept is currently ranked as the highest-rated Xbox One exclusive on Metacritic, beating its predecessor and previous title-holder Forza Horizon 3 in the ratings. Sales and reception of the Horizon games resulted in Microsoft buying the developer, Playground Games, earlier this year. The dev team seems to know what it’s doing. In many ways, Horizon 4 its predecessor’s footsteps, but the changes it brings are welcome and generally improve the game without adding compromises.  

If you’ve played a Horizon game before, you’ll know how this latest entry works. If you haven’t, here’s how it goes: there’s an open world. You’re in a car. You can drive around, gather collectibles, do an enormous variety of races, or just explore. There are drag races, point-to-point runs, lap courses, drifting and jumping distance challenges, stunt challenges, off-road racing, and more.

This time around, Playground Games has set up shop in an idealized version of the United Kingdom, drawing on the rich motoring culture there to form the open world for Horizon 4. All the event types take place in that open world, and they can be completed with almost any class of vehicle you desire, giving you a wide variety of racing options. There are even a few special races where you’re doing things like racing giant hovercraft down the side of a mountain and through a river, or driving a Warthog from Halo past lasers and enemy ships. 

Along with all that variety, Forza Horizon 4 is far more approachable than something like Assetto Corsa, Project Cars 2, or iRacing. Those other titles are all excellent games, but they’re targeted at die-hard racers looking for a more serious simulation than the Horizon series generally offers. Forza Horizon 4 can be as shallow a racer as it comes if you desire, or it can head towards some limited depth. It doesn’t demand the same level of practice, training, and patience that a game like iRacing does. To some people, that accessibility is likely a good thing, but for others it means they should probably skip this one.

Horizon 4 is great for my household because of its welcoming nature, though. There is literally no way my wife would invest more than two minutes in a game before she expects fun to happen, for example, and if a title has a learning curve steeper than that it’s getting turned off. Forza Horizon 4 lets you decide exactly how steep that learning curve needs to be with a huge number of difficulty options, and that really improves its accessibility and fun quotient. I’d love to see the developers add a split-screen option on the PC, though I expect they’re limited by the hardware on the original Xbox One in that regard.  

The customization doesn’t end at difficulty settings, either. If the dizzying array of default activities isn’t enough, you can create your own events, races, and challenges with the Horizon Blueprint for the enjoyment of you and your friends. Initially you had to choose between pre-made races and then edit the details of those courses like weather and car classes, but the latest patch added in a route creator, and it’s quite well implemented. You drive the route you want and place checkpoints where you desire and when you’re done you’ve got a course just as you want it. Whether it’s a standard circuit, an off-road course, or a drag race, you design it exactly how you want. With a maximum custom race length of 60 in-world kilometers, you have quite a bit of freedom to make your race however you please, too.

Given the incredible amount of content in the game already, I haven’t used Horizon Blueprint much yet. With Horizon 4‘s diversity of terrain, though, the tool opens up an almost limitless amount of content. Personally, I’d be after a destruction-derby-style race where I can make people go back and forth over jumps, smashing into each other over and over. I also lack friends on Xbox Live, so that limits the attraction of this feature for those lonely Xbox people like me. 

The online mode is now a constant background for the gameplay experience, whether with friends or otherwise. In the past Horizon games, you had to select whether to join either an offline or online instance. Offline, you’d play against the AI, which Microsoft calls “Drivatars.” If you were online, then you could mess around with your friends or jump into races with real people. In Horizon 4, real human players are just driving around as ghosts. You can message them, create groups, race them, or even just ignore them. It’s a much better system than in past games, and it will likely encourage people to play online more often. Once you’re grouped with somebody, collision turns on and the fun begins.

Some people have complained about Horizon 4’s difficulty being unfair and cheaty, but I haven’t noticed this during my time with it. Complaints of being passed on straight roads seems to be the gist of it, but I’ve found the difficulty to be reasonable and fair. Perhaps those early complaints were patched over, or maybe those giant engines I put in the cars are just paying off by letting me be the one to do the passing.

The Bucket List, a collection of mission-based races with specific parameters from prior games, has disappeared in Horizon 4 in favor of story-driven events like the Stuntman missions. Similar to the Bucket List’s missions, the Stuntman outings give you a specific vehicle and an objective to complete. The difference lies in the fact they’re now mostly stunt-based (shocker), so think big jumps, fire, etc. If the game left it at that, Stuntman missions would be fine, but now you must listen to a nonsense plot explained over extensive and unskippable dialogue.  

The voice acting and dialogue-based plot of the Horizon series has always been my biggest issue with this series. Those interjections are long-winded and annoying, and they detract from a really excellent game. (I think the same thing about Half-Life 2. Come at me, bro.) I don’t really need to listen to random characters argue about whether I’m a good enough driver for this mission, I just want to drive my car through the dang thing. I’d like to see a drastic reduction in the amount of “plot” and dialogue in these games going forward, or at least a way to skip it.  

Sadly, I can’t blast away that stilted bluster with my own music. OneDrive music streaming support is gone from this edition, as Microsoft has largely abandoned streamable media services over the last year. Microsoft often makes me wonder  what the heck they’re doing, and this is one of those situations.  

Past the boundless choice of activities, the next thing you’ll notice about this game is the graphics quality. The critical consensus is that the game has top-notch pixels, and I think that’s accurate. Whether you’re playing on an Xbox One, Xbox One S, Xbox One X, or a PC, eye candy abounds. The cars look amazing. Water reflections look almost real. The world design is gorgeous and diverse. It’s a joy to just drive around and see what the romanticized British countryside has to offer. There isn’t another racing game on the market that’s as nice to look at as Horizon 4, in my opinion, and this one even includes snow. I live in Calgary, and I’m already sick of snow!

With the Xbox One or Xbox One S, you get a Vsync-ed 30 FPS at 1920×1080. The S throws in HDR support. On the Xbox One X, you can choose between 30 FPS at 4K or 1920×1080 at 60fps, both with HDR if your display can handle it. On PC, you get to run at whatever your hardware can handle, including support for 4K resolution and HDR output. On my GTX 1060 6 GB, I set the game to dynamically maintain 60 FPS at 1920×1080. My settings are usually somewhere between the “high” and “ultra” presets. Forza games aren’t hard to run, and Horizon 4 only punishes hardware if you ask it to.

Not all of the visuals are perfect, of course. Some of the foliage can look a little goofy at low speeds, but it’s not too big of an issue. If you’re driving slow enough to see leaves to begin with, you’re playing the game wrong. Forza Horizon 4 really is a looker, and it makes me wish for a 4K screen and a graphics card strong enough to power it. Time to re-up that “Get SSK a new graphics card” GoFundMe.

 

To everything there is a season

When it comes to what you’ll be driving around this beautiful world, you have over 450 vehicles to choose from, though there are no Mitsubishi options and only a limited Toyota selection. Choices range from ancient classics to some weird and bizarre choices from racing bloodlines past. You can also hop into huge trucks, supercars, or a vehicle you may already have in your driveway. Once you’ve selected whatever priceless feat of engineering you’d like to smash into obstacles thousands of times, you can get ready to paint, tune, and upgrade.

Painting options are endless in Horizon 4, and it’s really fascinating to see the diverse and unique designs people come up with and make available to download. Mechanical and cosmetic upgrades are available for most every part of the car, including custom bodies, roll cages, weight reductions, brakes, tires (including compounds, widths, thickness, and custom rims), drivetrain, and more. Each of these high-level options typically has a variety of fine-grained tuning choices when you dig in. Of course, the options available depend upon the specific car and what it’s realistically capable of. Sadly, you can’t put a twin-turbo V12 into a VW Golf. 

I generally just get the biggest motor, the most expensive upgrades of everything, make sure the car is AWD, and then hit the pavement. It’s probably not the ideal way to play, but it works for me.  For players who want more options, you can adjust parts individually, and tune a significant number of different car systems, then share your tuned collection online for others to check out. People who put the time and effort into tweaking and thinking about ideal upgrades seem to do better, but who the heck has the time for that? DRIVE FAST, CRASH HARD is my motto. I did manage to make an Audi V10 undriveable with the upgrades I put on it. It had way too much power, and it was nigh impossible to keep on the road. Horizon 4 is fun and relaxed, but it’s not going to save you from your worst impulses.

Vehicle handling in Horizon 4 is similar to the previous games. Water showed up in Forza Horizon 3, and snow was only on display if you had that game’s Blizzard Mountain expansion. Horizon 4‘s twist for environmental challenges is its season system. Initially you earn a set amount of points by tooling around, and then you’re greeted with an announcement of the next season and a new game map which looks and handles entirely differently. Once you complete a full year locally, you join online seasons, and they change automatically for everyone. 

In spring you get rain, plenty of flowers, greenery, and lots of mud. Summer is full of rolling fields, less rain, and drier dirt. Fall has all the colors you’d expect and a similar handling environment to spring. In winter, you suffer with snow and ice, and everything is slick. The changes and handling variations are significant from season to season, and you’re essentially getting four different maps. It’s a neat idea, and it’s well executed. The map is also now significantly more varied vertically than in previous Horizons. Big jumps, hills, and pits abound, and it makes off-road races a lot more interesting than in previous entries. 

Not only can you buy new cars, as was the case in the past games, but now you can also buy properties and swag. You’ve always wanted to pay in-game currency for terrible emotes and goofy outfits you really only see on loading screens, right? To me, it seems like a way to pad out the game, since there is really an enormous amount of content already. The houses just act as garage hubs where you can change out your car, upgrade it, paint it, and so on. In prior Horizons, houses were just free hubs littered around the map. Now, you have to buy them. My fourteen-year-old daughter loves this system, so take that for whatever her approval is worth. I’m not sure who wanted this change (my 14-year-old aside), and I’m not sure why it’s in here. Perhaps I’m an outlier on this one, since I know people seem to enjoy buying property in Grand Theft Auto V, as well. 

If the nickel-and-diming stopped at houses purchased with in-game currency, I’d be fine, but Microsoft’s revenue model for this game follows in the footsteps of that philosophy. There are regular releases of additional cars locked behind DLC purchases, and I’m not a fan. This isn’t a cheap game to begin with, at $59.99 USD for the Standard Edition and up to $99.99 for the Ultimate Edition. Given the fact the standard edition has so much content, I’m not that annoyed, but it’s not a system I like on principle. If you’re going to add additional content, do it in a reasonably priced expansion pack with significant content alongside, à la Starcraft: Brood War. At least Horizon 4 doesn’t have loot crates.

I, like many people, didn’t buy this game outright. I opted for the $10-a-month Xbox Game Pass Microsoft offers as a subscription to a growing number of titles. The price is reasonable enough, and all of Microsoft’s exclusives will be launching with day-one access through Game Pass. Many of the games included work on both PC and Xbox, but not all. Play Anywhere games, such as Forza Horizon 3 and Forza Horizon 4, include automatic cloud syncing between platforms, at least, and I’ve gone back and forth between my Xbox One and my PC without issue (knock on wood). If you’re interested in the Game Pass access route, you should check out the complete game list before you opt in.  

You may be turned off by the fact that Horizon 4 is currently restricted to the Microsoft Store. In the past, users have complained about downloads stalling, massive patch sizes, and difficulty in navigating available content. I’m not sure how many times I’ve had to use WSreset in Powershell over the years when dealing with Microsoft’s e-shop. While the store does still lack some features, I haven’t experienced any issues with it in a while. Both Forza Horizon 3 and Forza Horizon 4 downloaded as quickly as my 75-Mb connection could handle and installed without issue. (No fiber service is available in my area in Calgary from any provider, if you can believe it. I had fiber in the middle of nowhere on the east coast of Canada, darn it!) 

The Store still needs quite a bit of work before it’ll catch up to Steam in many ways, but it’s at least functional now. Don’t expect any kind of decent profiling or curation. It’s still largely a mess, and search is really your only way to find what you’re looking for. Even then, the Store is often confusing or overly complicated. Given that the multiplayer functions work very well and the overall quality of the game, I’m willing to put up with the Microsoft Store’s shortcomings. If you can find what you want then it’ll likely work just fine. Given that AAA titles on the Store are quickly ballooning past 100 GB or more for the whole enchilada, however, Microsoft really, really needs to give gamers a way to back up and restore content.

In the end, Forza Horizon 4 is fantastic. It’s beautiful, well-executed, enormous, and—since the tragic stumbles of Gran Turismo—likely the best casual simulation racing game on the market. Unlike Gran Turismo, it’s also available on the PC. It’s universally well reviewed, but you probably already know that. If you’re on the fence about Horizon 4, there is a demo available on the Microsoft Store for you to take for a spin. If you’re a fan of racing games at all, I think you should put Horizon 4 in your garage. Its fast casual approach is different enough from the rest of the racing-game stable to make it a must-have for speed junkies.   

Josh Pozzolo

I WRITE ON THE TECH REPORT ABOUT ALL THE IMPORTANT STUFF YOU WANNA READ

Comments closed
    • chµck
    • 8 months ago

    anyone here play Need for Speed: Most Wanted?
    one of the best racing games i’ve played.

      • godforsaken
      • 8 months ago

      dunno if you’re being sarcastic, but, the racing game I most enjoyed is midnight club 2

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 months ago

      I preferred NFS Underground 2, but I’m also not sure if you’re being sarcastic.

    • EndlessWaves
    • 8 months ago

    It may be pretty, but if they were aiming for something that felt like the Britain they seem to have completely missed the boat, at least judging from screenshots and videos.

    It looks more like somewhere in Eastern Europe, where everything was levelled in the war and a communist autocracy came along afterwards and poured money into road building.

    Some exaggeration in road width and so on would be understandable, but they don’t have captured any of the contrasting and hodgepodge nature of so many rural British communities.

    • UberGerbil
    • 9 months ago

    If the game is set in an idealized version of the UK, they really should’ve hidden [url=https://i.stack.imgur.com/Dep0U.jpg<]this glen[/url<] in it (and then, as a bonus, provided a nearby cottage where you can upgrade your DB5 with... machine guns).

      • DarkUltra
      • 9 months ago

      If you want guns and rockets, try GRIP: Combat Racing. It is a spiritual successor tl Rollcage, and is awesome when a rocket passes you on a surround sound system.

      [url<]https://youtu.be/D3EwGnCT-nM[/url<]

    • End User
    • 9 months ago

    [quote<]The Forza Motorsport games are for those looking for the serious stuff[/quote<] The serious motorsport fan plays iRacing. Hey Josh, do you even know anything about the car in the title image? Did you play the game? Do you have a wheel and pedal set? If this was not a Microsoft title you would not even be remotely interested in it. Your pro Microsoft bias is just appalling. Who at TR let this Microsoft shill in?

      • godforsaken
      • 8 months ago

      Good job on context buddy, that quote was half of a two parter, comparing two Forza titles, noting that one is more serious than the other…

      Seriously, he even mentions iRacing 4 paragraphs further down…

      Calling him a shill after proving that you won’t even read past the first few paragraphs before insulting the writer, let’s just say, dulls your point a bit…

    • albundy
    • 9 months ago

    cant wait to drop this on my big screen. it’s too bad gsync isnt available on large tv’s.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 months ago

      Freesync is coming to new tv’s, and the Xbox s and x support it. I probably should have mentioned this in the article.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 9 months ago

        There’s also several workarounds to get freesync on Nvidia cards, and nvidia may even support it eventually, or at least they’ve hinted at it.

          • BurntMyBacon
          • 9 months ago

          Keep the dream alive!

    • Waco
    • 9 months ago

    Totally buying this for the Xbox – it looks good, fun, and varied.

      • LostCat
      • 9 months ago

      I didn’t even realize it was 4K30 playin it on my X1X…had to double check that after reading.

      It looks damn good.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 9 months ago

        30fps for a racing game = no thanks. If I had an X1X I’d be doing the higher-framerate 1080p mode.

          • LostCat
          • 9 months ago

          You’d be surprised how usable it is when it’s a perfectly steady framerate and high quality.

          Like, on the opposite end of the spectrum we had Need for Speed, which was incredibly terrible at 30fps on Xbox One. (The game couldn’t keep that steady, so in certain ridge areas and with fast cars it just did not work.) OG PS4 can’t keep a steady 30 on many titles either. PS4 Pro is much better at it but it still often doesn’t. (From what I’ve seen of comparisons from DigitalFoundry.)

          I’m on Witcher 3 and Destiny 2 atm on the X1X so I don’t have a lot of FH4 under my belt yet, so I won’t pretend to have seen all there is to see in it. I like the big 4K screen for racing, though I certainly could move back to PC if I feel the need.

    • ronch
    • 9 months ago

    Good grief some of the screenshots here are practically photo-realistic!!

    I miss my CGA days though, when life was simple and I was just getting started with these computers. For whatever reason I had more wonderment back then.

      • TwistedKestrel
      • 9 months ago

      That makes me think of the title screen for Test Drive

      • Lianna
      • 9 months ago

      For reviews like this one “Access to full-sized […] images in the image galleries” would be really useful. For obvious reasons (source resolution) FHD (~2MP) screenshots would be OK. Current 0.16MP to 0.21MP pictures are too small for any graphics value, save for general feeling.

    • Voldenuit
    • 9 months ago

    After some bad experiences with Windows Store games, I’ve sworn off getting anything from the Windows Store that’s bigger than 10 MB.

    Windows Update is just too klunky a system process for downloading and maintaining multi-gigabytes’ worth of game files for me to go through again.

    I haven’t even signed into my Windows account on my current 8700K desktop since building it a couple months ago.

    Which is a shame, because I really wanted to play Sunset Overdrive when it comes out on PC (soon).

      • TwistedKestrel
      • 9 months ago

      Yeah, very leery of the Windows Store version… the demo *still* doesn’t even launch for me and going by the support forum for FH4, there are more than a few wrinkles left to be ironed out

        • Voldenuit
        • 9 months ago

        Yeah, ars had an article recently where they also had numerous problems with games crashing on Windows Store due to program conflicts, and a very involved troubleshooting session with Microsoft support complicated by poor error code documentation.

        At this point, it is clear that UWP completely fails at its goal to be a robust sandboxed environment, and it’s clear MS only really wanted to shoehorn it into our Windows experience so they could monopolize their app store.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 9 months ago

      [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avwLrOBOxS4[/url<] [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WV2nVh1AUgk[/url<] [url<]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Clq_qeNDwAg[/url<]

    • Srsly_Bro
    • 9 months ago

    Not mentioned in the article was the co author (I assume.. Haven’t read yet), yours most truly, srsly_bro. I ranted at SSK about the rubber banding AI who out of nowhere pass on straight-aways even with the inferior car.

    I really like the game. I got the $100 version and really enjoy it. It’s not large or close to TDU series in size, which in my opinion are the best open world racing/driving games created.

      • sweatshopking
      • 9 months ago

      I’ve yet to see this occur. Generally, I find the ai reasonably reasonable.

        • TravelMug
        • 9 months ago

        You can see it even in the demo. When it puts you into the McLaren, just stop anywhere with long enough visibility. For example the lefthander with the rocky “cliff” on the right and the house at the bottom of the hill just before it gets to go up again. If you stop there you will see your opponents stop and waiting for you at the house 🙂

    • DPete27
    • 9 months ago

    [quote<]I'd love to see the developers add a split-screen option on the PC[/quote<] Single biggest hurdle to getting living room PC gaming off the ground. I think console makers are colluding to prevent this on PC titles.

      • LostCat
      • 9 months ago

      Have any racing games in the last ten years supported it on PC or console? I can’t remember any.

        • sweatshopking
        • 9 months ago

        The sonic racing games do, up To 4 players.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 9 months ago

      Ever since the original xbox, PC games quit supporting split screen, coop, and local network games. Yeah, they’re colluding.

        • Voldenuit
        • 9 months ago

        Right? According to steam hardware survyey, the most common multi-monitor setup ix 2x1080p monitors, so they wouldn’t even have to split-screen for co-op, technically.

          • DoomGuy64
          • 9 months ago

          Hell, I’d be happy with multiplayer coop. But that disappeared starting with Halo, and no AAA games since have majorly supported it. Multiplayer only games sure, but no major single player campaigns have coop like on the console. Really irritating, and makes me just not want to buy any of those games. That, and the game breaking p2w microtransactions.

          A lot of people don’t know about Depth, but IMO it’s one of the best PC exclusives for fun coop. Even with the lame dx9 UE3 engine and all, since I certainly have complaints about their performance and poor 3d sound implementation. Tolerable, but ridiculous that they don’t implement any modern engine features, especially since their engine breaks AMD’s forced AA, hinders framerate on modern systems, and 3d sound implementation makes it difficult to place location without resorting to 3rd party sound hacks and Razer headsets. But it’s still fun.

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