OCZ’s PC3000 memory

Manufacturer OCZ
Model DDR PC3000 memory
Price (256MB DIMM) US$89
Availability Now

EVER START TALKING TO a really gorgeous girl, only to have her get less and less attractive the more she says? “Like, whatever!” It seems that, generally speaking, the better looking something is, the less substance there is behind that beauty. It’s actually pretty depressing. However, there are a precious few whose beauty is equaled, and even surpassed, by their personalities.

OCZ’s new DDR PC3000 memory is simply gorgeous. Its red PCB and matching heat spreader can turn even the most reserved geek’s head.

So OCZ has nailed the looks, but does this fancy memory they have the personality to back it up? For PC hardware, a great personality manifests itself in stability and performance. It doesn’t hurt if it’s a cheap date, either.

Did our date with OCZ’s DDR PC3000 memory live up to the claims of 366MHz at CAS 2.5? Would we go out with her again? Read on to find out.

The lady in red
OCZ’s DDR PC3000 memory consists of a red PCB and your choice of one of three colored heat sinks. It’s only RAM, folks. There’s only so much you can do.


OCZ’s DDR would be pretty enough for even a Mac


Eight hand-picked Hynix chips per side

RAM doesn’t get that hot, but OCZ specs a simple heat spreader on its PC3000 memory just in case.


This isn’t a processor; a thermal pad works just fine


Thin enough

While I’m not sure how effective the heat spreader is, it doesn’t add any problematic girth to the DIMM. You should still be able to load up your motherboard’s DIMM slots without the heat spreaders blocking access to any of them. The spreaders will, however, diminish the airflow between the DIMMs you have plugged in.


The heat spreader in its initial position gets in the way

Unfortunately, the heat spreader on our review sample was a little off center, making it impossible to securely clip into the motherboard’s DIMM slot. It seemed like a simple fix at the time: just pop off the heat spreader and nudge things over a little. Unfortunately, the heat spreader is a real pain to remove.

I don’t foresee many mismounted heat spreaders slipping through the cracks at OCZ, but be sure to check before trying to secure the DIMM to your motherboard with a hammer.


Hynix’s chips are fresh out of the fabs

OCZ uses hand-picked Hynix chips in its DDR PC3000 memory, but the markings on the DIMMs don’t match anything in Hynix’s part number decoder. A similar part number can be found in this press release describing Hynix’s latest DDR chips, undoubtedly the same chips found on the OCZ PCB.

It’s worth pointing out that OCZ’s PC3000 moniker really isn’t anything official. OCZ claims that it surpasses the PC2700 standard, but there’s no official PC2700 standard for them to surpass yet.

 

What to look for in the test results
We’re not comparing OCZ’s PC3000 memory to anything other than itself, which makes interpreting the test results a little more complicated than usual. Instead of seeing several different products tested against each other, you’re going to see the same DIMM benchmarked at different front-side bus speeds and latencies.

So, when looking at our test results, keep in mind that the test system’s hardware doesn’t change at all. Instead, the only variables are the front-side bus and memory latencies that we’ve manipulated in the BIOS. Higher front-side bus speeds and lower latencies should yield better performance. OCZ’s memory will simply allow the system to remain stable at those speeds.

Including memory from other manufacturers in our testing would have been a little redundant. RAM modules are a commodity of sorts, and DDR SDRAM chips on different DIMMs should yield identical performance when running at the same front-side bus speed and memory timings. Regardless of whether the DIMM is from Crucial, Corsair, Kingston, or OCZ, performance should be identical provided the memory settings in the BIOS remain the same. The real test of a DIMM’s worth is how fast you can set the front-side bus and how much you can lower the latency while retaining overall system stability.

What we’re testing here is how well a system performs with an astronomical FSB speed and super-aggressive RAM timings, so you can see what buying a stick of fancy RAM can do for you.

Our testing methods
As ever, we did our best to deliver clean benchmark numbers. Tests were run three times, and the results were averaged.

Our test systems were configured like so:

In order to isolate the memory’s overclocking potential, we’re only running the front-side bus out of spec in our testing. An older, unlocked 1.2GHz Thunderbird makes an appearance because it lets us turn down the CPU multiplier to keep the CPU speed as close as possible to 1.2GHz without going over. It’s like The Price is Right, sort of.

We tested the system at the following speeds and settings to see just how much of a performance boost could be had from only front-side bus overclocking.

As you can see, we were only able to run at CAS 2 up to 183MHz. Beyond that, we had to switch to CAS 2.5 to get a stable system. The memory is only rated at CAS 2.5, so that’s not a big deal. More importantly, we had to disable direct memory access (DMA) modes for the system’s IDE controller at bus speeds above 165MHz. Otherwise, the system wouldn’t boot into Windows. DMA enables devices—in this case the hard drive—to send data directly to memory without having to go through the system’s processor. This is especially important to keep in mind when looking at some of the disk-intensive benchmarks, which will put an additional strain on the processor when DMA is disabled.

The test systems’ Windows desktops were set at 1024×768 in 32-bit color at a 75Hz screen refresh rate. Vertical refresh sync (vsync) was disabled for all tests. The motherboard’s BIOS was tweaked with the most aggressive settings possible, without sacrificing system stability.

We used the following versions of our test applications:

All the tests and methods we employed are publicly available and reproducible. If you have questions about our methods, hit our forums to talk with us about them.

 

Memory bandwidth
First up we have Sandra’s memory bandwidth tests.

In the ALU test, the performance scales predictably.

Sandra’s FPU scores differ a little from what we saw with the ALU results. Here, CAS latency becomes more important than bus speed, and our 183MHz CAS 2 setup scores higher than the 195MHz CAS 2.5 configuration. The battle between CAS latency and memory bus speed will be one to watch through the rest of the benchmarks.

Business Winstone 2001
Typically, you wouldn’t be doing extreme front-side bus overclocking to improve your word processor performance, but Business Winstone does produce some interesting results.

At bus speeds above 165MHz, where DMA had to be disabled, Business Winstone’s performance tanks spectacularly.

Content Creation Winstone 2001
On to Content Creation Winstone, whose suite of tests is more intensive, in some ways, than its Business sibling.

The lack of DMA really hurts Content Creation Winstone’s scores, but that’s no surprise. Multimedia content creation moves a lot of information back and forth from the disk.

 

Quake III Arena
Quake III Arena starts off our game benchmarking. Let’s take a look at the results.

Thankfully, Quake III Arena’s frame rate doesn’t suffer when DMA is disabled. Notice the importance of CAS latency: our 183MHz bus at CAS 2 scores noticeably higher than our 195MHz bus at CAS 2.5.

Serious Sam
Serious Sam is up next. Will CAS latency continue to play an important role?

Sort of. Here the CAS latency and MHz differences seem to balance each other out, with the two fastest scores tying. DMA continues to be a non-issue in gaming, at least in terms of average frame rates.

3DMark 2001
3DMark 2001 rounds out our testing. Let’s see how the performance stacks up.

Like the Serious Sam results, 3DMark 2001 shows almost identical performance for 183MHz at CAS 2 and 195MHz at CAS 2.5. Again, the lack of DMA isn’t a hindrance for the faster front-side bus speeds.

 

Conclusions
OCZ’s DDR PC3000 memory looks great, but more importantly, it performs exceptionally well. Though only rated for 183MHz at CAS 2.5, I was able to run the test system’s bus at 183MHz with CAS 2, and at 195MHz with CAS 2.5, with no stability problems. You may or may not be into the look of OCZ’s DDR PC3000 memory, but you can’t diminish that kind of a performance.

Since no one else makes “PC3000” memory, we have to look at the next best thing for a price comparison: PC2700. On Pricewatch, generic PC2700 memory runs $70 for a 256MB stick. OCZ’s PC2700 runs $78. At $88, OCZ’s DDR PC3000 memory doesn’t see a huge markup. Consider for a moment that Corsair’s lauded XMS2700 CAS 2 DIMMs go for $132 on Pricewatch. Our sample from OCZ ran at “PC3000” speeds and CAS 2 without a hitch, and for less than 70% of the cost. That makes it a pretty good deal in my book.


Your reward for reading all the way to the conclusion

Because we ran our system so far out of spec for this review, I’d classify our testing as extreme overclocking. That said, OCZ’s memory will work in faster platforms, where reaching 183MHz won’t be such a huge jump. SiS’ 645 chipset already calls for a 333MHz DDR memory bus, and VIA’s KT333 is also on the way. These chipsets require PC2700 memory to run at their stock speeds without any overclocking. Currently, OCZ’s DDR PC300 memory is the only memory rated by its manufacturer to handle front-side bus overclocking on these DDR333-capable platforms. So while you can get your fix of extreme overclocking on older platforms, OCZ’s DDR PC3000 also gives you a shot at some more moderate overclocking with future products. DDR333-capable motherboards shouldn’t require disabling DMA modes to get the most out of these DIMMs, either.

If you’re looking for RAM that scales to incredible front-side bus speeds, look no further than OCZ’s DDR PC3000 memory. With its performance matching its great aesthetics, and a price that you’ll be hard pressed to beat, this one goes to 11. 

Comments closed
    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    The review is not what I expected of a high performance part..
    At least that is my view.
    The test should have been done upping the FSB speed and adjusting the voltage on that kickass motherboard and not turning down the cpu multiplier in order to see what this stuff can really do.
    Overclockers are the only ones who will buy this part, and we want increase total system performance not keep it relatively the same, my 1.33 Athlon with a much lower FSB kicks the crap out this setup by a huge margin in your test results..
    Remove that review and give us a real one..
    No “ANDS, IF’s, or BUTS”
    That’s my opinion –

    Jules

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I am pretty sure OCSystem is not OCZ. ocsystem is some POS shit reseller that screwed me over in california

    I emailed
    ocz and I think you all should to
    tell them to pull that crappy a** reseller

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Your message cannot be delivered to the following recipients:

    Recipient address: service@OCSystem.com
    Reason: Remote SMTP server has rejected address
    Diagnostic code: smtp;550 5.1.1 <service@OCSystem.com>… User unknown
    Remote system: dns;mail101.store.yahoo.com (TCP|206.13.28.240|47824|216.136.224.113|25) (mail101.store.yahoo.com ESMTP Sendmail 8.11.2/8.11.2; Wed, 13 Mar 2002 11:14:30 -0800 [PST])

    Wonderful, their e-mail doesn’t work now either. Guess I got chumped. Damm them anyway.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Ordered the 3000 memory, based on this review and others. Had to wait an extra week due to back-order. Got the RAM, it’s crap. Massive errors, only boots with lowest settings in BIOS. Ran MemTest-86 v2.9, massive errors in every single test, huge problems. Put my Crucial back in, no probs at all.

    Contacting OCZ? What a joke. Phone calls, for over 90 minutes, either a busy signal or rings no answer for a minute, then goes fast busy. Trying e-mail, but no one responding yet. I am not a happy camper. Should have stuck with Crucial or Kingmax. I have no idea how good the RAM is, not with the defective piece of garbage I got shipped, but customer service is not bad, it’s completly lacking. So far, I wish I had never heard of these chumps.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Does any 1 know if the 3000 is Ecc or Non Ecc?

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I love this stuff. I have no idea what half the stuff in this post means, but the wry humour which colours each line is enough to bring tears of laughter to my tired face after countless hours of reading required intellectual histories about the origins of environmentalism. Please, keep up the good work.

    ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚ ๐Ÿ™‚

    Da Fahq

    Forgot my password, don’t want to post as an AG

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Well the older I get the more I realize that chicks really do dig brains:)

    Later

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I still wanna know who the girl is…

    Later

    • Joel H.
    • 18 years ago

    #63,

    I said before that PC-3000 was great RAM. I’ll stand by that.

    On the XP333 motherboard from IWILL, of the Corsair, Crucial, and OCZ memory I tested, only the OCZ would run in “Ultra” mode on a 133 MHz FSB.

    Furthermore, the RAM proved capable of running up to 195 MHz DDR in “Normal” mode.

    Now, as I’ve already expressed here, I have some reservations about OCZ the company, all of which come from being badly burned myself by them about 18 months ago and the experiences of others. They’ve recently been bought out, however, and I’m curious to see what happens. Extremely wary, yes, but still curious. Companies DO change, and they just might be on the right path.

    I will, however, stand by the fact that the RAM is good.

    • MadManOriginal
    • 18 years ago

    Why is it that all the peeps who are saying ‘Bad Things’ about OCZ are registered users, and all those who are ‘Running Their OCZ PC3000@{insert super high FSB here} are AG’s??

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    of course I meant to quote “EVER START TALKING TO a really gorgeous girl, only to have her get less and less attractive the more she says?” but you’re still biggots

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    “It seems that, generally speaking, the better looking something is, the less substance there is behind that beauty. It’s actually pretty depressing” WOW! That’s EXACTLY how I feel… about Tech-Report, the more I read it, the more I hate it, why do I still read it? Well damn nothing really pisses me off anymore, that and irc but it’s a necessary evil.

    • Forge
    • 18 years ago

    ****ing A, Kyle.

    /me loves not being the only OCZ-hater in town.

    • Herman
    • 18 years ago

    Nice naval though…

    • Herman
    • 18 years ago

    no offence but…

    damn that memory is ugly !!!

    Is it just me?

    ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Dposcorp
    • 18 years ago

    Yeah, what Kyle said.
    Am I a kiss-up or what?

    • LiamC
    • 18 years ago

    Why are all the posts vouching *for* this memory from AG’s? – one qualified exception.

    • monaco
    • 18 years ago

    #46 I doubt very much that any bank in their right mind would lend OCZ the half mil to start a manufacturing plant, especially given their shady past.

    Am I wrong? Anybody know for sure whether OCZ actually manufactures things?

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    sorry Kyle

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I love rocks.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Just bizaree.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    This is getting out of hand guys

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Matt Macgill was the guy
    What a bastard
    Krohn got fired heheh
    Athlonoc is gone
    Broken gods was last seen at the [H]
    Forumoc loosers

    • Joel H.
    • 18 years ago

    I know for a fact that one OCZ employee (Matt Rickage I believe his name was) would post at ResellerRatings pretending to be a buyer–I called him out on it once, in fact.

    I’m not at all convinced OCZ has changed their ways, BUT, I’m willing to wait and see what happens. If the company goes back to its old ways, you’ll find no harsher critic than me–once burned is twice wary, as the saying goes.

    • Forge
    • 18 years ago

    AG #34 – That you, BrokenGods? Krohn? Sounds like. Could be wrong.

    AG #42 – Your name isn’t Ryan, perchance? Probably not.

    I’m looking forwared to the OCZ guys showing up to AG spam ads. They’re notorious for running a Google each day looking for ‘AthlonOC’ and ‘OCZ’ and spamming flase good reports.

    I’m not directly accusing anyone here of being ringers, I’m just looking to see if we get a repeat of ยง[< http://www.tech-report.com/news_reply.x/2049/<]ยง or one of it's kin.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Manufacturing equipment is not as expensive as you think , only about $475,000 for a full SMT assembly setup, Its not like they have to make the memory chips ,

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I’d like to know if the current SiS-735/635 ECS boards at least allow FSB overclocking?

    Just how well does the current SiS chipset overclock? (I’d like to see results form a non-Via sometime – since I’m never going to buy Via again).

    not so interested in the next generation Sis – mostly the FSB ability of the current chipsets (735 and 635).

    thanks for any info on the Sis boards.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I’ve had great experience with OCZ PC3000 memory. I run an ABIT KR7A-RAID with 2 sticks of this memory. I got it up to 198 cas2.5 normal timings somewhat stable (I think this is a limitation of this board), but I dropeed it down to 166 cas2, 2-5-2 timings cause this boards only got a 1/4 pci divider and I really don’t like PIO mode =) I’ve been running this setup on Windows XP with DMA enabled for at least 3 months now with no problems what so ever except that the computer is done booting and is ready for me before I have the milk poured for my cereal. =)

    • monaco
    • 18 years ago

    Somehow I don’t think that OCZ ponied up the billion dollars for a RAM and vid card plant. They gotta be just rebadging somebody elses’ products.

    This RAM in the review definately kicked some ass, but I’m sure you can find stuff just as good from other places for much less.

    How does this RAM stack up against the same stuff from Crucial, anybody know?

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    So I should stop buying from Newegg ?

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[

    • Joel H.
    • 18 years ago

    I also had a terrible experience with OCZ (and yes–OCZ and The Overclockerz Store) ARE the same company–but I’ve heard they have gotten somewhat better.

    I can verify that the PC3000 RAM is great RAM–but I am also wary of the company, even now.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[http://www.tech-report.com/reviews/2002q1/abit-bd7/index.x?pg=1<]ยง ), or failing that, is there really any technical challenge for chipset makers to get their dividers to superlow levels, possibly even 1/8?

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    i[

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    The PC3000 works for me… No complaints here

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Forge ,

    Its cool if you dont like them , but I mean why would I care if run some review site , all the review sites I ever seen were run by some company or might as well have been , look at toms hardware and intel , the whole industry is biased

    the products the best shiz i seen ya know , so why not own the best , thats why I read reviews,

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I got some PC-3000 from NewEgg. Runs great. Using an Abit KR7A-Raid, unlocked 1400 I got it up to 198 FSB before it was unstable. Course I clocked it down to 190 to be perfectly stable with room to spare, but I bet with new chipsets their PC-3000 will go faster. Cause no company ever realeases a product that isn’t tested above the standard. Look at P4’s overclocking. I just wish I could get my hands on the upcoming Abit P4 DDR board to test that out with the RAM.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I just got a stick of this to go along with my Abit BD7 and P4 2.0a

    I must say that I was rather surprised it got up to 190MHz CAS2.

    Memory scores were in the vicinity of 2900/2900 from SiSoft Sandra 2002.

    From what I know about OCZ, they are a manufacturer and sell their products to retailers now ( newegg, ability etc… )

    I am personally happy with my PC3000 256mb stick.

    Even though OCZ did jump the gun and make a PC3000 stick, there isn’t even a standard for PC2700, yet you see Corsair and Kingston(Kingmax? whatever it is) making PC2700 modules.

    • murray
    • 18 years ago

    well, i assume that’s how it’s done. i give no guarantees. it might be a link to a treatise on the dangers of the australian wombat.

    • murray
    • 18 years ago

    at the bottom, between the posts and the submission form
    “Create an account”

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    BTW I bought mine at newegg , no problems

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I am AG #16 BTW , also post #27

    How do I get a password

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I think your confusing OCZ with the overclockerzstore
    the overclockerzstore is sometimes refered to as OCZ , OCZ is a brand name of product , they dont sell products directly to the public

    I do know the overclockerzstore has bad service

    • Damage
    • 18 years ago

    Local:

    Odds are very good the hard drive wasn’t happy with DMA enabled at such high PCI bus speeds.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[

    • Forge
    • 18 years ago

    AG #16 – It’s the same people, I don’t care how many company names they make up to hide behind.

    I was a big time devotee of OCZ when they first came out. Pretested overclocks and nice gear to go with it sounded like heaven… All the benefits, no risks. After a while, though, I noticed there was a significant amount of squelching in their forums… All of people who bought ‘AMD Athlon 750@1.1GHz‘ and couldn’t get past 950MHz, or similar. Seems OCZ was having some trouble finding enough CPUs to meet demand and was stretching their speed re-bins too far.

    That in itself did not piss me off. It was folks being ignored or banned for discussing their trouble.

    Later, there was a massive pump-and-dump where huge numbers of orders were taken and ignored… Presumably to gather the initial cash for OCZ’s new ram/graphics OEM initiative. Nobody got their cash back from that for weeks, sometimes months.

    These people set up three and sometimes four ‘independant’ websites so that they could trade approving reviews and product placement plugs back and forth. They tried to blackmail a webmaster that was trying to expose them. They repeatedly attempt to use anonymous comments systems and open forums to trash the opposition and plug their products.

    Basically, OCZ got bought out a few weeks back, and I was nothing but overjoyed. Nobody from the original AthlonOC/OCZ/HardwareOC is listed in the credits, but I won’t buy from them till I *know* that no one from the first go-round is involved.

    </rant>

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    SO thats what the PC-3000 means

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    396 , its rated 366 , 366=3000Mb s

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Oh goody goody

    This stuff I got only does 396Mhz DDR , Its just not fast enough

    • ChangWang
    • 18 years ago

    Hey guys,

    Anandtech just brought up thier own reseller ratings.

    ยง[< http://www.anandtech.com/ratings<]ยง Check it out

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I’m crossing my fingers on this RAM, I couldnt get my KR7A board to recognize more than 256 of the 1 gig of my Crucial ECC’s. I should be getting the gig of the PC3000 today and hopefully I’ll be able to oc a little better than the crucial pieces or atleast recognize the full gig of creamy smoothness.
    Speaking of creamy smoothness nice bel-lay!!

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Whos that girl , gimme her number

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Newegg does carry OCZ , I think you maybe confusing OCZ with the old overclockerzstore , OCZ just makes stuff

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Good grief, someone do a situp!

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[

    • Hallucinosis
    • 18 years ago

    Too bad resellerratings went down….

    • Corrado
    • 18 years ago

    NewEgg is selling it. I just ordered a gig of it…

    • TheCollective
    • 18 years ago

    OCZ’s reseller rating was pathetic at best. I wouldn’t touch them with a 10 foot pole. Now if NewEgg is selling it I might consider it. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    It’s funny that OCZ makes up standards as they go along.
    I would feel much better if they didn’t stick the “PC” in front of it. The whole point of the “PC-” was to define that it was a standardized module, which OCZ is clearly trying to fool people with.

    Always some company who tries to bend the rules…

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Forge, I’ll take ANY GF . . . preferably a GF4 . . . erp . . . oops.

    #7, all Dissonance probably had to pay for was dinner. ๐Ÿ˜‰ and if you’re a true geek, naked hardware alone should cater to your baser instincts . . .

    Anyway, wasn’t there some furor earlier about OCZ’s reputation? I never paid much attention to it, but I know some people were pissed off . . .

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Interesting.. I’m using Samsung PC2700 DDR at “PC2860” speeds on an Asus P4B266 board right now. Wondering how my Sandra mem-scores would look like with OCZ PC3000. BTW the Samsung PC2700 was just a few bucks more than PC2100.

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    I have a question and a suggestion.

    The question: Who posed for that navel-RAM shot? Was it someone you know or a model hired for the occasion?

    And the suggestion: Why stop at bare navels! Why not have CPUs resting on bare breasts, hot topless women licking mothboards, hard drives inserted into… er, never mind.

    I think it would be great for the site! Just think of all the people who start reading an article but never finish, depriving T-R of much-needed ad revenue! By pandering to our basest tastes in the conclusion, you can guarantee every single person who starts reading an article will finish! (Unless they’re gay, but I’ll leave that to some other tech site.)

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    AG4, yeh, I agree with your thoughts, but I complaineth not. I’m looking forward to more skin-report(tm) articles. ๐Ÿ™‚

    I do believe we have a world’s first here with that ram shot.

    And speaking of “beauty”, I find cool-running ram with no stinking heat spreader a lot more “beautiful” than anything with a damn heatsink on it. But that’s just my perception of beauty.

    Cool-running, silent, low-power consumption….
    <droooool…>

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    …or have SCSI luvin.

    I know everyone else will be kinder, but what’s up with that hideous belly ring? The things are god damn annoying and outrageously prone to infection. Worse yet, I understand they’re no longer in fashion ๐Ÿ™

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    *[

    • Anonymous
    • 18 years ago

    Um.. since when is disabling DMA even an option? Geesh. I do still need to LOAD stuff from the hard drive..

    • Forge
    • 18 years ago

    You can keep the ram, I want Diss’s GF.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This