Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition untethers Radeon gaming

2018 is drawing to a close, and that means it’s time for another big red box under the tree from AMD’s software team. Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition delivers the goods with a free, integrated way to stream games from your Radeon-powered PC to any device that can run the AMD Link application on iOS or Android. The company’s ambitions don’t stop there, however. The next release of Radeon Software will also let gamers wirelessly stream Radeon-powered SteamVR experiences to their standalone VR headsets, including Google Daydream and Vive Focus devices.

The skeptical out there might question the wisdom of adding so many intermediary steps to the latency-sensitive VR experience. AMD says that because it controls the entire graphics and network stack, it can deliver frames with impressively low latency. Another piece of the puzzle remains using asynchronous timewarp on the headset itself to smooth our the experience. While we don’t have a standalone headset in the TR labs to test with, the company says the overall experience can be “surprisingly good” on a fast network. Indeed, an 802.11ac wireless access point is required to use VR streaming with the AMD ReLive VR app.

The company does caution that the types of games ideally suited for this experience are ones that work well as seated experiences, just like the early days of the Oculus Rift. In turn, those who want to try streaming VR titles to their standalone headsets will want to make sure that the titles they’re considering pair well with an Xbox controller. The company says that as standalone headsets get more advanced features like six-degrees-of-freedom inside-out tracking and internally-tracked motion controllers, the experiences possible with streaming VR titles from Radeon cards will also grow more advanced.

For more traditional game streaming on phones and tablets, AMD says it can push frames up to 4K resolution and at rates of up to 60 FPS. The company understands how crucial it is to get controls right for this type of experience, and it’ll support a robust set of on-screen controls with a full editor. Gamers can bring their own wireless controllers to the party, as well, and the application will allow button remapping to get an ideal handle on any title.

AMD also points out that it’s not limiting gamers in what they can stream. Should a user just want to stream their desktop to a remote device for whatever reason, they can do so. Finally, the AMD Link app will allow users to turn off their desktop’s display while streaming to ensure privacy and save power.

WattMan tuning goes thought-free

If you still plan to play games directly on your desktop PC, there are plenty of new features to love in this Radeon Software release. AMD’s WattMan tool can now perform automatic overclocking for better performance or even automatic undervolting to improve efficiency with only a small performance tradeoff.

The improved WattMan can also expose multi-point fan curves for fine-grained control over a graphics card’s performance-per-decibel. Radeon RX Vega graphics card owners will find that all of the dynamic power management states of those cards are available for tweaking through WattMan, too.

While WattMan is a useful tool, overclocking a graphics card by alt-tabbing into Windows from a game, tweaking some settings, and seeing whether those choices pushed the card too hard is an annoying and imprecise process. AMD has improved the WattMan experience by making its controls available through the Radeon Overlay, the in-game control center the company introduced with last year’s major feature update.

Tweakers can now adjust GPU frequency, GPU voltage, temperature limits, memory frequency, and more without leaving their game of choice. Once you’ve tuned your graphics card using the Radeon Overlay, that utility can now tell you just what you’ve gained with a more refined set of performance-gathering tools. The overlay can now display frame-time measurements in addition to the classic Fraps-like mode it had before, and users can adjust the colors, visible metrics columns, position, transparency, and size of the overlay on their game to taste.

AMD’s Radeon Chill dynamic power-saving feature has worked without a whitelist of supported titles for a long time now, and it’s getting even more effective in the Adrenalin 2019 Edition release. The company said that it’s done some work under the hood on Chill so that its graphics cards can step through their dynamic power management states even faster, resulting in as much as 20% more saved power in some titles.

 

Radeon pixels get prettier

Radeon gamers will find quality-of-life improvements once pixels make their way from an AMD graphics card to a monitor, as well. First, AMD is enhancing the value of FreeSync 2 monitors for owners of those displays. In the past, game developers had to explicitly support FreeSync 2’s hardware-accelerated tone mapping by invoking an API on a per-game basis, and that requirement has apparently limited the rate of adoption for the technology.

With the Adrenalin 2019 Edition release, the Radeon graphics stack will automatically tone-map content mastered in the widely-supported HDR10 standard to the proprietary standard employed by FreeSync 2-certified monitors, making a wider range of HDR content available on those displays. That tone-mapping is still accelerated on the graphics card, too, meaning that the potential latency advantages of FreeSync 2 remain intact.

AMD is also making owners of its ultrawide displays happier with the Adrenalin 2019 release. The Virtual Super Resolution feature lets owners of powerful Radeon graphics cards render games above a monitor’s native resolution before downsampling to the final display resolution, in effect supersampling the game and producing better image quality. Now, that feature will be available to users with 21:9 displays if there’s extra graphics-processing power that they want to put to use.

To help users control their displays on a finer-grained basis, AMD added some display features to the Radeon Overlay, as well. Adrenalin 2019 exposes per-game controls for the Enhanced Sync feature so that gamers can adjust that experience in real time. The FreeSync toggle now lives in the Radeon Overlay display tab, as it ought to. Finally, folks who want to use AMD’s driver color adjustments will find that those controls can be applied on a per-game basis through the overlay. Custom color settings will also be applied automatically when a game launches and removed when it’s closed.

AMD Link gets a voice

It seems like a new voice assistant pops up every day, and AMD Link is no exception. The Link app will now respond to voice commands.

Users can just say “Hey Radeon…” and invoke several potentially convenient commands, like taking a screenshot, starting or stopping a stream or local recording, or saving an instant replay. The app can also tell you your average FPS, GPU core temperature, core clocks, memory clocks, or fan speed. Should your Radeon drivers fall behind the company’s release schedule, you can invoke the update process through the app, as well.

If you’d rather not tune your Radeon card from the desktop or Radeon Overlay, AMD Link also incorporates a comprehensive set of WattMan commands. The mobile app now has controls for GPU frequency, voltage, temperature limits, memory timing, and memory frequency, just like the desktop app. AMD Link further adds the ability to capture basic performance metrics like average, minimum, and maximum FPS in a report.

AMD Link can now become a second screen of sorts for folks who want to share their exploits with the world anywhere and at any time. The app now links to the ReLive gallery so that users can see screenshots, play back videos, and crop and save those video clips to the phone. The app can now become a second screen of sorts for gamers who want to see the chat rooms on their YouTube, Twitch, or Facebook Live streams.

There are even more features in Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition to play with for streamers and sharers that we didn’t have time to cover this morning, but as always, this Radeon Software update is free to download and play with should you want to explore it in greater depth. If you have a Radeon card, you’ll find the Adrenalin 2019 Edition release is available for download today.

Comments closed
    • DevilsCanyonSoul
    • 9 months ago

    AMD was the ‘go-to’ for a few years now but I’ve had it with their software efforts. Their partners are even worse when it comes to chip-set drivers and the like. Asus is becoming just as bad as MSI. And Radeon Adrenalin has been messed up since summer with incessant HDMI audio driver issues under WIndow 10 that have gone unaddressed. Ryzen and Threadripper are beasts, but the bigger AMD ecosphere is bush league garbage… not helped by the OEMs. Nvidia won back my hard earned money. Vote with your dollars !

    • Seamus
    • 10 months ago

    New drivers, new bug. In DOOM 2016, when running a Vega 64 under the Vulkan renderer, approaching a dead guard to take a Prator Suit Token results in a visual artifact of blue squares on the screen around the figure that remain as you move the mouse to look around, so that you can “paint” your entire screen with them.

    Back-revved to previous driver and confirmed that the visual artifacts don’t appear with that driver. Informed AMD of the bug, so hopefully they will find and fix for next release.

      • Seamus
      • 10 months ago

      Update–this bug was not fixed by 18.12.3.

      AMD support continues to work with me on this issue. When a resolution is found, I will update this thread.

      • Seamus
      • 9 months ago

      Update — this bug is fixed in 19.1.1.

    • Lordhawkwind
    • 10 months ago

    Steer clear of these drivers they are a total POS. Most of the features don’t really work (placebo?) and the fan curve is an absolute joke. I’ve got a Vega 64 and I have to say these are the worst drivers I’ve ever tried. Disappointed doesn’t even come close. Maybe time for Terry Mackedon to retire or get sacked whichever works.

      • Krogoth
      • 10 months ago

      No problems here and they are far better than before. I have a reference Vega 64 unit.

      Fan curve is different but it is much better than before. You finally have control of clockspeed/voltage for the other power states unlike the older drivers where you were stuck with states 6 and 7. Just like the Polaris/Hawaii cards.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 10 months ago

        Yeah, these drivers work better than before, and have more features. I’m sure there are a few glitches, but it’s nothing particularly noticeable. I did have an issue where my monitors got reversed, and I had to switch them back, but I think that’s mostly a windows problem. The phone app doesn’t seem to keep a steady connection, that could be wifi, but it’s not a big deal either. Games seem to run smoother.

          • Shobai
          • 10 months ago

          I’m noticing a vast increase in BSOD under these drivers with an R9 290; I’ve tried install-in-place, clean install, refresh win10 + clean install. I’m not completely convinced it’s just these drivers, but my stability is out the window.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 10 months ago

            Every so often it seems you need to DDU AMD drivers, since one random dll or registry setting from last year sticks in the OS, and DDU magically fixes everything. It also could be a real bug, or hardware failure. The 290’s seemed to be built with lower quality components than the 390, and mine died (free 390 yay!), as well as several other people I know. Usually the biggest complaint is overheating before failure. Which didn’t make sense for me, since I even replaced the thermal paste before the card died. Probably was the components.

            AMD screwed up the low power states on Hawaii ever since the change from CCC. You only get 150-1500 mhz states, which isn’t even enabled by default. AMD claims the issue is hardware based, and is due to using 144hz. Liars. It worked fine before, and it works fine if you manually underclock the memory. The card doesn’t need to run memory 1500 Mhz on the desktop for 144hz or dual monitors. They screwed it up, and are making excuses to not fix the bug, and since nobody has ever publicly called them on it, that bug has gone unfixed for years. Since that is AMD’s official attitude towards Hawaii now, I can’t see any serious bug like BSOD’s getting fixed if they introduced another regression. Maybe, who knows. You also have to make sure you are using the latest windows 10 update with the latest driver, since any mismatch causes complete chaos that goes away once you install the matching driver.

            • Shobai
            • 10 months ago

            Ta – I’ve done that in the past, I guess I’ll give it a go again.

            I’m confident heat is not currently the problem; this particular card was air cooled for a few days, the I had the core under water for about a year, then a full cover block since. 2x 280mm radiators handle water->air duties.

            I am unfortunately well aware of that, although since I run dual monitors I was aware that there locked memory clock was an issue before the move from CCC.

            Another consideration I have is that Microsoft this week pushed a SecurityDevice update 4.4.0.0 over the top of the 4.9.0.0 that they pushed in October, so both that and the GPU drivers happened on the same day and I don’t know which to blame, or if it’s something else.

            • DoomGuy64
            • 10 months ago

            Dunno, but Microsoft is not helping matters. The last serveral updates borked numerous sound drivers, and anything older than a year is likely not working right. AMD was even effected, as the older drivers would not work, which would have been a major issue had the newer drivers introduced any bugs. These compatibility issues need to stop, as it is breaking systems, and will likely lead to alternatives like linux and vulkan getting stronger marketshare down the road if it continues.

            Things like deleting people’s documents folders is just crazy, and I’m surprised that there haven’t been some class action lawsuits over it. Hell, maybe there was, and I just didn’t hear about it. They did address it fairly quick, but that never should have been released to the public either.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 10 months ago

      The fan “curve” seems to be a fan “staircase”.

      The fan speed seems to stay the same until you reach one of the points that you’ve set on the chart, then the speed jumps up to that point.

        • enixenigma
        • 10 months ago

        I’ve noticed that on my Vega 64 as well. They don’t give you enough ‘steps’ to really smooth it out, either.

        • Krogoth
        • 10 months ago

        It is working like any of the PWN fan controllers that are commonplace in UEFI on recent motherboards. I find that it provides better management but it requires more tweaking versus the old system.

          • JustAnEngineer
          • 10 months ago

          I see no evidence of proportional control in the new Wattman fan controller’s performance when a manual fan profile is set. The fan speed steps up from one level to the next when the temperature of the next dot is reached. There is no fan speed variation when the temperature changes anywhere within the gap between two dots on the profile, no matter the slope of the displayed “curve” in that range.

    • End User
    • 10 months ago

    I was trying out the auto overclock feature for the GPU and the PC rebooted to a blue screen. I can’t recover from any of my restore points. Odd.

      • ptsant
      • 10 months ago

      Wattman is already very easy to use for manual overclocking. Auto overclock doesn’t make much sense, don’t waste your time.

      Although auto undervolt seems nice, if you haven’t already tried that.

    • ozzuneoj
    • 10 months ago

    I just tried using the AMD Link on my iPad Pro 9.7 running from my HTPC equipped with an RX570 8GB and when its working its pretty nice. I sort of cheated in that I had a wireless keyboard and mouse already controlling the computer directly so there was no extra input latency brought on by peripherals connected to the iPad (not that Apple would let me do this with any of the dozens of peripherals I already own anyway…), but it was responsive enough for gaming well beyond what an iPad could handle.

    The problem I had though was that rebooting the system basically made AMD Link stop working and it was generally a pain to get it connected again. One time it would simply not allow me to reconnect the system until I disabled AMD Link on the PC and started over on both devices. Another time it didn’t recognize that the system had been rebooted at all, so it never disconnected, and yet it wouldn’t respond to the PC after the reboot so I had disable and remove everything yet again.

    The interface is very nice with a lot of options on the PC and the mobile device, so hopefully they get the bugs worked out and make it handle system reboots more gracefully. I don’t generally have much of a need for this, but nonetheless, it is a neat feature to have. The RX570 in my HTPC was sort of a accidental acquisition that ended up finding its home there (replacing a 1050 Ti), so its definitely a bonus to be able to experiment with AMD’s latest features. I’ve completely stayed away from most of Nvidia’s features on my main system (GTX 970) because I have no desire to install Geforce Experience.

      • BobbinThreadbare
      • 10 months ago

      At some point we can just have 1 computer in our homes and stream to all the screens. Dumb terminals are back and they’re good again

        • ozzuneoj
        • 10 months ago

        Latency still has a long way to go for it to be lag free, but at least the option is there for less competitive or slower paced games. For that matter, if they can make it work reliably it’d be nice to just be able to use a PC from anywhere in the house on a tablet. I know that I’m in the minority, but I find mobile versions of nearly everything (websites, applications, etc.) to be so inferior to Windows versions that it can be infuriating.

        The convenience of mobile devices has really just allowed us to waste twice as much time doing the same tasks we could have done faster on a PC, but now we can do it anywhere we go.

        Screen mirroring software like this at least allows the most tedious or resource heavy tasks to be done on a PC from anywhere in the house without needing a powerful (and expensive) laptop.

    • Acidicheartburn
    • 10 months ago

    Having just made the switch from 3 generations of AMD GPUs to a 1070ti, I have to say I’m pretty jealous. AMD Radeon Software IMO is a much nicer experience than Nvidia’s ancient ugly GUI which is also missing a few important features like built-in frame limiting. The new WattMan overlay being available in games is a nifty feature I would have enjoyed using.

    AMD has been killing it on the software side of things and I hope they bring out some killer GPU’s next year to back that up.

      • Fonbu
      • 10 months ago

      Earlier in the year I had also made the switch froma Radeon R9-290X to a Geforce 1080Ti. The performance increase was very nice.

      But like you have been mentioning, their control panel has a terrible GUI. Its also finicky when applying settings and the settings panel lags bad when it searches for all your installed games, which is shows for per-game settings.

      That AMD software looks fantastic!

        • Acidicheartburn
        • 10 months ago

        I agree, it lags in a number of places, and even takes longer to open than the AMD software. I find it rather disappointing, especially now that if I want variable refresh I have to pay a $200 tax for it.

          • DoomGuy64
          • 10 months ago

          I had that exact same problem with AMD lagging my game profiles, especially when I have a ton of games. Until now. The new driver seems to do better getting into profiles, as it doesn’t try to load everything at one time, and caches a bit smoother. Still a few hitches when exiting global, but getting into global no longer lags.

      • RAGEPRO
      • 10 months ago

      Man, I have the exact opposite experience. The Nvidia Control Panel might be ugly, but it [i<]works[/i<]. AMD Settings is a garbage app full of flashy modern design but really lacking in functionality. You can't even adjust your resolution or refresh rate! Why do I have to open a whole other application to do this? I guess I shouldn't be surprised since every interesting setting is on a whole new page of the application. Not only that, but it crashes about every other time I attempt to open the 3D/Gaming settings while it struggles to pull up all the game-specific profiles. Just, ugh, it's a mess. Give me an app that looks like Windows XP but works every time, any day.

        • Acidicheartburn
        • 10 months ago

        But you can adjust your resolution and refresh rate. Go to the Display Settings tab and click on “Create” where it says “Custom Resolutions”. From there you can do some really custom things like change your resolution to any custom size, adjust or overclock the refresh rate of your monitor, or even mess with the timings. Once you have things set you click apply or save, whichever it is. Then you go into the windows display settings and choose your custom resolution. Then go into the display adapter settings for the screen of your choice that you made a custom resolution for and you can choose the custom refresh rate. I was able to get 6 more Hz out of my monitor (huge, I know) with this.

          • sweatshopking
          • 10 months ago

          I ocd mine to 80hz, and the other to 70hz.

          • RAGEPRO
          • 10 months ago

          Man, what? This is not a solution. Who wants to mess with custom resolutions when I just want to fix my refresh rate after applying VSR?

          Also, both AMD and Nvidia had custom resolution panels for years, and Toasty’s CRU still works better than either. Even worse, AMD’s old custom resolution panel in the CCC was better than the flat design mess they’ve got going in Radeon Settings, which is just a clumsy port of that old panel.

          Your post reads like you haven’t used the Nvidia control panel to adjust resolution or refresh rate lately. It’s nice — the color depth and black level settings are right there too. No flipping through several tabs to find what you want.

        • ptsant
        • 10 months ago

        Adjusting the resolution and refresh rate is done through windows display settings. Duplicating access to a feature/function is a recipe for disaster. So, maybe there should be a link in Radeon that opens display settings or maybe MS should open up Radeon window when you click on display settings.

        I’ve never seen any of the other problems you mention over several years, although I only have 2-3 datapoints (from respective PCs) and I don’t usually play the latest games (typically I’m about 1-2 years late).

          • RAGEPRO
          • 10 months ago

          See my reply to Acidicheartburn, but yeah. On a machine with a few hundred games installed, the Radeon Settings app becomes real unreliable when trying to open the “Gaming” tab to adjust driver graphics settings. It’d be nice if the global Wattman settings weren’t hidden back there.

          RE: duplicating access to a feature being a recipe for disaster, I mean, maybe it goes against software design best practices; sure, I could see that. That hasn’t stopped Windows for decades. Intel does it, Nvidia does it; at this point AMD not doing it seems like an omission rather than any kind of good design practice.

          More to the point though, the Windows 10 “display settings” dialog is an absolute abortion requiring me to make TEN CLICKS to change my refresh rate, and toggle through three separate windows (two of which can’t be open at the same time) to mess with Display settings. Yeah, I have other ways to do it (third-party tools) but it’s just obnoxious.

          The NV CP puts it all right up front in a single page with clean dialogs that are intuitive and simple to use. That’s what good UI design looks like.

        • ColeLT1
        • 10 months ago

        Had to stop using wattman for Vega56 because all the issues, the profiles would just revert to stock every reboot, and after about ~5hrs of uptime. Switched to overdriveNtool and everything worked correctly. Wattman never worked correctly for my use.

    • Dysthymia
    • 10 months ago

    Damage gave an interview to Steve Burke over at Gamers Nexus on [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3ehmETMOmw<]frametimes[/url<] and the new Adrenalin 2019 [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FuXEhtRBuZE<]driver[/url<].

    • End User
    • 10 months ago

    I must be drunk. Move along.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 10 months ago

    Did they finally release a driver that won’t disable VSR when I install it? Last handful of drivers I’ve installed, I’ve also had to go through afterwards and turn VSR back on.

      • DoomGuy64
      • 10 months ago

      Dunno, never had that problem, but I do hate how VSR disables 144hz/freesync, and you are stuck with 60Hz, outside of forcing supersampling or using 3rd party VSR methods.

      edit: haven’t tested latest driver, simply because there aren’t too many games I use VSR with. Supersampling works much better in practice, as VSR can cause other issues like hud shrinkage and resolution switching issues. Especially if you alt-tab.

        • RAGEPRO
        • 10 months ago

        I have that problem. However, VSR doesn’t disable 144Hz, nor FreeSync. You can use either, and have been able to since at least last year. I’m doing 3840×2160 @ 120Hz on my 1080p 144Hz display as I type this.

        Although, confusingly (since the actual resolution of the image sent to the monitor doesn’t change), if I have another monitor plugged into the Radeon I only get the option to go to 85Hz. Really weird.

        In general DSR was a way better experience. I hope AMD improves VSR.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 10 months ago

        I basically play only old or light games. BattleTech isn’t old, but it’s light on the graphics hardware. Diablo III and StarCraft 2 are old and also light on the graphics hardware. So this bugs me a lot.

    • astrotech66
    • 10 months ago

    Quotes from the [url=https://www.pcworld.com/article/3327569/components-graphics/amd-radeon-software-adrenalin-2019-update.html<]article[/url<] on PC World: "Radeon’s [u<]Scott Wasson[/u<] explained how AMD achieved the results. It all starts with ReLive’s streaming software stack: AMD’s frame capture engine is used to record and stream your games to other devices, and the graphics driver gets direct access to the frame buffer as soon as your game renders an image." "The final step of the process relies on the dedicated asynchronous compute hardware built into Radeon GPUs to capture gameplay on your PC with minimal overhead. “Video streams are encoded in H.264 with Radeon video encoding hardware,” [u<]Wasson[/u<] told me via email, and optimized for a blend of low latency and good visuals." "[u<]Wasson[/u<] also provided information on the special sauce on both the mobile and VR sides: ..."

      • sweatshopking
      • 10 months ago

      i do dearly miss my old friend scott. Starting this site back in the day was one of the highlights of my life. Getting pushed out of the business was not.

    • DevilsCanyonSoul
    • 10 months ago

    All Adrenalin packages following after 18.5.2 have High Definition Audio Controller/High Definition Audio Bus device driver ‘reload’ issues that are well documented on the web and that relate to display connectivity. This so-called ‘massively updated’ 2019 package suffers the same nonsense. AMD is aware but can’t seem to resolve the issue.

    • Topinio
    • 10 months ago

    Nice, but for the timing: I only just updated and rebooted everything, including the Radeon drivers, as Patch Tuesday was 2 days ago…

    • BooTs
    • 10 months ago

    This seems like a legitimately encouraging software update. A lot of great features that seem like the software is reaching a high level of maturity with a sense of purpose.

    I can’t remember the last time I was excited to install software from a hardware vendor.

      • Krogoth
      • 10 months ago

      I think Dr. Damage’s influence is at work here. ;D

        • BooTs
        • 10 months ago

        I was thinking that as well. The awareness to provide features for streaming is great, and I wonder if that is the influence of someone younger in the team. Kids these days love streams.

        Or it could just be smart PR/marketing. So much advertising is through “influencers” now.

    • End User
    • 10 months ago

    My Vega 64 needs all the help it can get (VR – iRacing).

      • sweatshopking
      • 10 months ago

      Help it help me. I can pm you my mailing address and it can put this r9 out to pasture.

        • End User
        • 10 months ago

        I’m going to give it to Glorious.

          • sweatshopking
          • 10 months ago

          i don’t believe you.

            • Redocbew
            • 10 months ago

            Good call.

            • End User
            • 10 months ago

            I’ve changed my mind. I’m going to give it to Krogoth.

            • Krogoth
            • 10 months ago

            ROFL, I already have one and my current PSU can’t handle a Vega 64 CF.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 10 months ago

            I’ll take a hit for the greater good. He can send it to me.

      • Krogoth
      • 10 months ago

      It is locked behind software harnessing its hardware effectively. It is pretty much a suped-up Hawaii /Polaris under DX11.

      AMD RTG has pretty much abandoned advanced support for Vega architecture in gaming graphics. They are treating it like a Hawaii/Polaris on roids.

        • DoomGuy64
        • 10 months ago

        Mostly, but I think there may be a few benefits past that. It’s just that AMD doesn’t thread DX11 like Nvidia, nor do developers strongly optimize for the architecture in Dx11, so the benefits are minimal. Meh, a “roided up Hawaii” works good enough.

        Hell, so does the regular Hawaii, but it was getting long in the tooth, and did have some performance bottlenecks in comparison to Vega. That, and the more AMD updates the drivers, the more Vega seems to improve. So, there’s that.

        Hawaii really was a good chip though. It’s pretty awesome how long it’s stayed viable for gaming, but most modern titles do have to be scaled back to be playable @ 1440p.

    • enixenigma
    • 10 months ago

    Some very useful additions (auto-overclock/undervolt, FINALLY making Overlay useful, auto tone mapping for HDR10 -> Freesync2), and some novel streaming options, but not much relating to performance improvements. The voice commands are…nice, I guess.

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 10 months ago

      The improvements to Wattman alone would make this a great driver update, even without the other benefits.

    • Krogoth
    • 10 months ago

    #PrimativeShadersMatter
    #AsyncShadingForever
    — Raja 2018

    • chuckula
    • 10 months ago

    Oh crap. Forget about our dgpu plans, we give up!!
    — Raja & the gang.

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