The death of Windows Phone and the five stages of mobile grief

Denial

Running Windows Phone so I can stay 100% Microsoft is totally fine, even if it’s 2019. Nothing else out there strikes the balance I’m looking for. I don’t need any apps that I don’t already have. I like having an unusual phone, even if it’s showing its age a bit. Someone needs to carry this torch. I can hold out until Microsoft gets its act together and comes back to mobile with a new offering.

Anger

Freaking Microsoft! I still can’t believe they dropped Windows Phone after all this time. Why do they always do this? The only reason it failed is because they didn’t try harder. The market needed a viable third option, and they somehow managed to blow it. They have all the money; they could have bought their way into the market, but they chickened out and didn’t pay the cost of being late to the party.

Bargaining

Well, maybe I can switch to Android and just use the Microsoft apps. Thank goodness I at least have that option instead of being stuck with only Apple. I’ve heard that the Microsoft apps on Android are actually better in some ways than the native apps I’m used to. I know I’ll adapt quickly. It will be only a temporary inconvenience.

Depression

This sucks. Android is annoying and different. I will miss my clean interface and Live Tiles. I don’t care about the new features, I just wish it had the polish and nuances of Windows Phone. So few people will ever understand how great Windows Phone was, and there will be no empathy from anyone who doesn’t know what I know.

Acceptance

This Android thing actually has some nice features, and it’s really nice that it runs Chrome. I guess it’s kind of cool that I can run the Alexa and Hue apps on my own device now, instead of stealing the family iPad. I can deal with the changes I don’t like because, if I’m being completely honest, there are a few things I like better.

And so it begins

Yeah, I know I used this intro before. But I figure it’s only fitting to reuse the same format to tell a similar tale. Like Windows Media Center, Windows Phone has a long history and, also like Media Center, I’ve been a user for a long time. And of course, Microsoft unceremoniously abandoned Windows Phone, just as it did Media Center.

This phone was great for playing emulated SNES Harvest Moon

My tutelage as a Windows Phone, then Windows Mobile, user began with the Samsung BlackJack II sometime in early 2008. That may seem like an odd choice given that the plucky new iPhone had just hit the scene and Android phones were coming. However, Windows Mobile was the “nobody ever got fired for buying IBM” of smartphones at the time, so as an IT professional, I rolled them out to all my users when we switched from Verizon to AT&T, and they served us well.

Time marched on, and a couple of years later we reached the quaint (by modern standards, but practically obligatory at the time) two-year upgrade cycle and contract renewal with AT&T. This is arguably where I first went wrong. The iPhone 3GS was a viable option back then, as was the Google Nexus One, but I still wasn’t convinced by these newcomers. I placed the “safe bet” and stuck with Microsoft, issuing the HTC Tilt 2 to all my users. It turned out they were just, you know, kind of okay. We didn’t make it to two years before switching things up.

This phone’s screen still impresses me

In late 2010, I was salivating over the prospects of Windows Phone 7. Finally, I could give my users a modern mobile experience and still stay within my trusty Microsoft ecosystem. This is what everyone had been waiting for, right? I was first in line to use our early renewal option and purchased a fleet of the Samsung Focus. At the time, the AMOLED screen it sported was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen an image displayed on, and, oh my, black was black. The combination of the screen and the colorful if unorthodox GUI completely won me over. I was hooked, and my users dug it, too.

This phone should have taken the world by storm

Strangely, by the time late 2012 came around, Windows Phone hadn’t taken over the mobile world. I didn’t understand it, but whatever. A couple of my users seemed interested in the iPhone 5—their family and friends liked it I guess, blah blah blah. But I had my eye on the prize: the Nokia Lumia 920. How could you could you not love that spec sheet? Magical wireless charging, an awesome camera, dual-core processor, 32 GB of memory, and Windows Phone 8, too? I mean, come on… It even had brightly colored polycarbonate bodies as an option. Of course, I ordered all of ours in black. It was heavy, too. Really heavy. It had the kind of weight that you knew meant “quality,” the kind of weight that meant if you dropped it on your toe, you’d lose a toenail (true story). This was validation that hanging with Microsoft mobile for nearly five years had finally paid off. 

But then it was suddenly the end of 2014, and not only was Windows Phone still just a bit player in the market, there wasn’t even a new flagship phone for me to switch to? What. The. Heck. Microsoft? That’s not how acquisitions are supposed to work! I couldn’t believe that the only Windows Phone worth upgrading to was exclusive to Verizon. I felt, for the first time since going all-in on Windows Phone: I’ve made a huge mistake. 

This phone was an underrated workhorse

By the summer of 2015, my users were questioning my judgment and giving me strange looks when we crossed paths. They couldn’t get the apps that they heard everyone else talking about for their dumb Windows Phones. It was time to switch gears. I had to play the value card. Management would ignore all the user complaints if I could point to a huge pile of savings. iPhones and flagship Android phones were just too expensive, and I couldn’t justify recommending them just because people wanted to use Waze to help them speed. So I switched to Verizon, went no-contract, bought a bunch of $200 Lumia 735 handsets, and used the financial win as the reason for giving Microsoft one more chance.  These phones were for work, after all; they didn’t need to be fancy. 

But by late 2016, I could no longer hold back the tide. Adding insult to injury, the new Lumia 950s came out on AT&T not long after we switched to Verizon. Screw it, we’re going BYOD, I thought. I cooked up a plan for the company to offer everyone a $300 phone credit every two years and washed my hands of the entire mess. Some people jumped ship from Windows Phone right away. Others still cautiously trusted me and my Windows Phonedom, and waited to see what I would do next.

This phone was five years old before being put to pasture

Nobody liked what I did next. And they stopped asking me for advice. In early 2017, I was still in denial and picked up a refurbished Lumia Icon for a song. Sure, it was older than the Lumia 735 I was still using, but it was better in every way. It ran Windows Phone 10 just fine, too. Of course, the battery life wasn’t great, but I wasn’t a heavy user anyway, and chargers are everywhere. What did I expect from an already three-year old phone? It would last me until something better came along, at least.

Nooooo! I missed my chance—my absolute last chance—to get a respectably modern Windows Phone. It was late 2017, and the HP Elite x3 got a surprise Verizon-compatible version out of the blue. You could order it right from the Microsoft store, but it was like $600, and I couldn’t stomach the expense, even with the BYOD credit I’d devised. So I foolishly waited for a price drop, but by the time I caught wind of the sale, the damage was already done: All the Elite x3s were gone, and they were never coming back. (Trust me, I looked.) I had gambled and lost.

And that’s the sordid tale of how I ended up using a five-year-old refurbished Windows Phone all the way into early 2019. Fish, you idiot, you shouldn’t have waited. Yeah, I know. The last straw was a pair of incidents last month where my Icon died on me while I was taking photos, even though it reported that the battery was more than 80% full. I can put up with a lot of crap, but I absolutely need a reliable phone. It was time to move on.

 

I don’t know phones, but I know what I like

With the history lesson over with, we can finally talk about the device I chose to replace my beloved yet accursed Windows Phone. I’m not suggesting that my choice is the choice for Windows Phone refugees. I don’t have enough experience to properly compare and contrast my new phone with the alternatives. Further, I’m all too aware that my preferences in this arena don’t align with those of most other people. You could be kind and say that I have a massively skewed perspective. If you were less kind, you could say that the depth of my ignorance is practically a superpower.

You know what they say about ignorance, though. It really has been bliss until now. You would think that with such low standards, I would be impressed by almost literally any handset in the modern midrange-on-up collection, right? Ha! I’m more jaded about the mobile scene than I’ve ever been. I find all these new phones completely and utterly boring. The prospect of selecting a specific slab of overpriced smart glass from amid the nearly identical options felt like pure tedium to me. This is not to mention the sky-high prices of the so-called “flagship” devices. Oof, I don’t think so.

This phone is basically just me throwing a hissy fit

That’s why I bought a BlackBerry KEY2 LE. The goof factor was high, and it ticked everything on my meager list of so-called “right boxes.” After scoping out my many options, I felt that the KEY2 LE was the most interesting choice, and no other superlatives mattered to me. (As a bonus, Bruno thought it was stupid.)

The KEY2 LE’s most obvious feature is a physical keyboard, which is something I haven’t had (and haven’t missed) for nearly a decade. That leaves the phone with a somewhat odd 4.5″ 1620×1080 screen. However, its 3:2 aspect ratio is good enough for Microsoft Surfaces, so it’s good enough for me.

As to the rest of the specs: The KEY2 LE has an octa-core Snapdragon 636 SoC, 4 GB of RAM, and 64 GB of storage. The storage is expandable, though, and the phone supports dual SIM cards in the same internal bracket. It comes running Android Oreo 8.1, but an update to Pie is purportedly coming soon. It packs in three cameras—a 13-MP-plus-5-MP duo on the back, and an 8MP front-facing camera. The KEY2 LE supports fast charging over its USB Type-C port and, get this, it has a 3.5mm headphone jack. I’ll never use that port, but I will lord it over more courageous phones. All in all, not too shabby for $450 (or less, depending on sales).

Launchers to the rescue

There’s one more piece of the puzzle to talk about before I can tell you if and how my gamble on an oddball smartphone paid off. Arguably, this leaves me firmly in the “denial” stage of this whole ordeal, but I’m willing to accept that. I got wind of these things called “launchers” on Android. I already knew about the ones that OEMs use to ruin what I’m told is a perfectly functional stock interface. What I didn’t know was that there were third-party options out there that were made to look like Windows Phone. I did some research and picked Launcher 10.

My home screen after my first week with the KEY2 LE

The first thing I did after getting through the initial setup process on the KEY2 LE was to hit up the Play Store and download Launcher 10. I immediately paid for both in-app purchases—ad removal and access to the Live Tile functionally—for a grand total of $8.50. I unapologetically did not give stock Android a chance. All told, I probably spent less than five minutes poking around at what normal Android (technically, the BlackBerry Launcher) looks like before forcing it look like Windows 10 Mobile. I just wanted to keep the dream alive, even if it was just a facsimile. 

Over the course of the next few hours, I moved into my new phone and got it into a basic usable state. It was a lot less painful than I was expecting, and I credit Launcher 10 for making me feel at home much more quickly. The stage was set.

 

Unholy trinity

As I write this sentence, I’ve been using the Blackberry KEY2 LE smartphone for three weeks. It’s a strange brew, but it’s working out incredibly well for me so far. I am highly amused by the combination of the keyboard and Launcher 10, and that delight has gone a long way toward easing the sting of the switch from Windows. After the initial setup, I feel like I’ve made fewer and fewer tweaks each day and may finally be completely settled in. I’m not going to recap all the nitty gritty details; their nature is all too familiar and mundane. To name a few examples, though, I’m talking about sorting out duplicate contacts, getting calendars properly synchronized, and making numerous adjustments to permissions and notifications.

We’ll dig into the three most significant changes shortly, but I want to start with some general commentary about the phone. These are simply likes and dislikes that have stuck with me so far.

I like the fingerprint unlock, which resides in the spacebar of the keyboard. I’m glad there’s no silly “my face is my warrant” unlock nonsense happening here. However, I have noticed that the fingerprint reader won’t read any of my digits the first few minutes after I’ve gotten out of the shower. It makes sense, and it’s a common issue with fingerprint readers on smartphone, but I’d never encountered it before.

I don’t like the lack of wireless charging. It’s handy, cheap, and protects the port from wear and tear. It should be standard at this point, and the fact that it’s missing from the KEY2 LE was almost a dealbreaker for me.

I like having a normal rectangular screen; there’s no notch drama here. I feel like a notch would drive me crazy. It’s not an OLED screen, but the black levels on the KEY2 LE are good enough to meet my personal performance preferences. Overall, I’m happy with the screen quality.

When connecting to Bluetooth in my car, the KEY2 LE connects the Hands-Free Profile almost instantly, but the Advanced Audio Distribution Profile frequently drags behind, anywhere from 30 seconds to a few minutes. It’s extremely annoying—distracting, even—when I’m ready to go and want to start listening to a podcast but must wait.

Many of the reviews I read before buying the KEY2 LE dinged it for its low-end camera. Indeed, even my old Lumia Icon is better than this new handset’s camera. Even so, I don’t think the camera is as bad as reviews made it seem. It does feel like a compromise coming from my old phone, though, which is unfortunate. I’m not losing sleep over it, though; I think of a phone’s camera as something pretty utilitarian. If I need better photos, I can find better lighting.

Finally, we come to the battery. It’s a good one. I’m not a heavy user; I don’t play games on my phone nor spend long stretches browsing the web with it. But I went two full days of normal use without having to charge the KEY2 LE, and it still had a 36% charge left. I expect heavy users will have plenty of battery left after an entire day, and moderate users will have no problem stretching to two days. It’s all academic to me, though; any phone that can get through an entire day is good enough in my book.

The Keyboard

So the BlackBerry KEY2 LE has a physical keyboard. It’s not calculator watch-levels of dorkery, but it’s, you know, different. Look, I’m not going to argue that physical keyboards should make a comeback on phones. There isn’t the same case to be made for them as for mechanical keyboards with a PC. But I would argue, especially now that I’ve gone back to one, that the primary reason physical keyboards are obsolete is because the software component of a phone’s keyboard is more important. Swiping keyboards and improved text prediction rightly take precedence over tactile feedback for most people.

Even so, there’s something about the KEY2 LE’s physical keys that are charming. I personally dig the throwback to my old BlackJack II, which I was very fond of. This might sound weird, but having a tiny keyboard on the bottom makes the phone feel more like a proper little computer, instead of just an all-screen pocket gizmo. Now, where’s my CLI?

I do feel like the balance of the entire phone is a little off, though. Sacrificing a bit more of the screen for a taller keyboard would have been worth it. (Before you object on the grounds of video-friendliness, know that if I’m watching video on my phone, my values have already been severely compromised, and a little bit of letterboxing is the least of my concerns). I could really use an extra row of keys on the top that are dedicated to symbols.

No school like the old school

Speaking of the keys, they feel good. I’ve used crappy, tiny “keyboards” before—you know, the $20 Bluetooth garbage meant to pair with a tablet or as an all-in-one device for media playback control. By contrast, the KEY2 LE gives you a keyboard with keys you actually press, instead of just squish. My gut tells me I’m already a bit faster on the KEY2 LE than I was on my Lumia, except when it comes to punctuation. It’s not a dramatic difference, though.

I decided to use SwiftKey on the software side, just to push my Microsoft theme to the limit. Even though I can’t swipe with the physical keyboard, I like SwiftKey well enough. But I’ll keep hunting for a software solution tailored for phones with a built-in board. It would be really nice simply to have a single row of user-defined keys always at the bottom of the screen. I suppose the software side of the keyboard is one aspect of the KEY2 LE that I’m not 100% settled into yet.

The Launcher

If you’re a Windows Phone diehard, this is the part of the story you’ve been waiting for. (Also, hi guys, I’ll see you at IHOP on Friday). Launcher 10 is the key to this experiment—to making Android feel more like a Windows 10 Mobile feature update instead of an entirely new operating system. I did consider a couple other Windows Modern UI-esque launchers, including Square Home 3 and the Microsoft Launcher, but by all accounts, Launcher 10 was the most faithful imitation of what I know and love. So I just went for it.

The thing about the standard iOS and Android interfaces, in my opinion, is that they just feel like cluttered desktops full of shortcuts. I just think they’re hideous, or at the very least, inelegant. There are better ways to manage shortcuts than to have them lazily arranged on screen after screen of grids.

Windows 10 Mobile’s Live Tiles, which Launcher 10 imitates, offer a better UI. Sure, the so-called Live Tiles are shortcuts to their respective apps, but they’re also essentially mini versions of the apps themselves, capable of showing notification information right inside each tile. I can see upcoming calendar information, messages from Slack, or traffic updates in them, just to name a few functions. Of course, those notifications are also available from the normal notification center in Android, as they were on Windows 10 Mobile. That makes the launcher a largely aesthetic choice, but I still found it invaluable for getting over the sour feelings I had about switching to Android.

It’s a bit of a bummer that the fake Live Tiles in Launcher 10 are limited to only the information that can be gleaned from notifications, though. It makes them a bit less robust than Windows Phone Live Tiles that could access data that ran a bit deeper. For example, I miss my weather Live Tile, but using an Android widget in its place is working out just fine. Launcher 10 lets me customize widgets to match the look, size, and layout of my other tiles by specifying their height and width, so they fit in. I can do the same tweaks to Launcher 10’s Live Tiles, with greater flexibility than true Live Tiles. It’s good stuff.

Launcher 10 also gives you fine-grained control over the background colors of the tiles, including the level of transparency. You can rename the tiles, group them into folders, change the icons, and override the default Live Tile data that’s shown. There’s even a handy real-time preview of all these tweaks so you can see the outcome as you make your adjustments.


In short, Launcher 10 gives we Windows 10 Mobile refugees almost exactly what we’re used to from the home screen and the app list (that you reach from swiping to the right). Of course, once you launch apps, native or otherwise, you’re back in Android land; but honestly, just finding everything in the same place I was used to finding it was most of the battle for me. It turns out that was all the victory I needed (well, that and using Microsoft apps when possible). Once you’ve seen one settings control panel, you’ve seen them all, you know? To any remaining holdouts, come on in, the water’s fine.

For Android users without Windows Phone experience, you can expect to create a vertical home screen full of tiles. It scrolls fluidly, so you don’t have to flip through pages of icons. There’s an alphabetically sorted list of apps at your disposal off to the right side that looks identical to the scrolling app list from the Windows 10 Start Menu. Consider giving it a try, if for no other reason than to see what weirdos like me have been squawking about for years. Launcher 10 is an excellent facsimile of Windows Phone.

The OS and native apps

Can you Android people explain why your silly OS complains to me about memory all the time? My KEY2 LE has 4 GB of RAM, but apparently Android is incapable of managing it without my help. What’s up with that? I refuse to install an app to sort out what the OS should be handling on its own, so when I see that message every couple of days, I just restart my phone. Maybe the Pie update will fix it.

I’ve got it under control now, but holy cow there are way too many notifications on by default. I just shut up a lot of apps by turning off their ability to talk with me unless I ask them to. For some of the others, I denied specific types of notifications. The first couple of days I had my phone, it was incredibly annoying to constantly be interrupted, track down the source of the interruption, and shut it down. The first time I took my phone with me to a store, it asked me to leave a review of the store when I left. I’m not a prude about location services, but I was not happy about being spammed with nonsense like that while out and about in the real world. As Phoebe from the Magic School Bus would say, “On my old phone, we never saw anything like this.”

As for the rest of the OS, I’m pretty Krogothed. I mean, it’s just a platform for apps that’s flexible and feature-rich. (That may be the shortest Android review ever.)

I have few comments about native apps. I’ll start by saying that I don’t have anything to say about the Google Assistant, because I switched to Cortana before I even tried it. Unfortunately, I have yet to figure out how to get Cortana to read me my texts in the car. That’s annoying and may cause me to look for a solution elsewhere. I’d prefer not to, though. Alexa and Cortana are already more than sufficient digital assistants for me (and they play nice together).

So far, I’ve been using the Google podcast app, but I might search for an alternative because it annoys me that it won’t automatically download podcasts. Yeah, yeah, it’s a streaming world, but data caps are a thing, and so is spotty cell coverage. I’d just as soon have my podcast app download my shows over Wi-Fi and play from a local copy without me having to do it manually. Google’s approach is a bit too modern for my taste, which is a shame, because the app is otherwise satisfactory. I don’t think I’m using any other native apps except for Chrome and Maps. 

 

Conclusions

I’ll concede that maybe I’ve been using phones “wrong” and that maybe I’d be more excited about them if my lifestyle or age were different, but they aren’t, so I’m not. I guess my own personal flavor of reality is what’s allowed me to reside happily in my own little Windows Phone world while the rest of civilization continues to be unaware it was even an option. The good news is that it turns out the switch from Windows 10 Mobile to Android can be almost completely painless. I wonder how Linux feels about that.

A modern stone age family

After years of resisting and lots of apprehension about making the switch to a different mobile platform, I’ve arrived, and now I’m left wondering what exactly I was missing. Seriously, what’s the big deal again? Why were people telling me my phone was so backwards? I’m perfectly happy with where I landed, but I was happy where I was before. There wouldn’t even be anything remotely noteworthy to write about if I hadn’t started with a history lesson, picked out a quirky phone, and insisted on a Windows-like launcher. Is that a good thing? I’m not sure, but it feels like proof of what I already thought: For all their prowess, phones are just dreadfully dull, even when you try to spice them up to entertain the gerbils.

Colton Westrate

I post Shortbread, I host BBQs, I tell stories, and I strive to keep folks happy.

Comments closed
    • kamikaziechameleon
    • 6 months ago

    Windows leaving the mobile market really hurt their platform IMHO.

    • ronch
    • 7 months ago

    I’m just glad Nokia’s phone line has been able to rise from the ashes after that Elop guy deliberately crashed them so Microsoft could buy them cheap and use to build Lumia phones, only to take them (Nokia) down with them (MS) as Windows Phone crashed and burned.

    • morete
    • 7 months ago

    We still need a third mainstream non-forked Linux kernel mobile OS option. As for a non-Linux mobile OS, webOS would be a good platform if someone would ever get around to develop it for a modern day smartphone. Again, forget the popular 3P apps. Just give us basic navigation, web browsing, alarm clock, calculator, etc.

    As of now, the only third alternative that is slowly being developed is Ubuntu Touch OS. [url<]https://ubuntu-touch.io/get-ut[/url<] Ubuntu Touch will only work on older devices like the Nexus or similar. Android has to be wiped from the handset or tablet, and Ubuntu can then be installed. There will come a day when legacy mobile OS's like Android and iOS will disappear, and that includes desktop OS's like Linux legacy distros, Windows NT and Apple OSX. Container OS's are the future. A skeletal OS will run in the device's background and all of the native and 3P apps called "containers" will be run from the cloud. A few examples are: Core OS [url<]https://www.infoworld.com/article/2692889/coreos-an-existential-threat-to-linux-vendors.html[/url<] Project Atomic [url<]http://www.projectatomic.io/[/url<] Alphabet Inc. (Google) is already working on several container OS's. Which one they will replace Android with is anyone's guess at the moment.

    • horvendile
    • 8 months ago

    Fun read, thanks!
    For useless reference, I lament the disappearance of physical phone keyboards. I had a tiny one on my Nokia E71 ages ago, and I have never before or again written so fast and accurately on a phone.

    Swedish is a lousy language for phone dictionaries since it (Swedish) allows, even encourages, constructions of new words which don’t exist in the dictionary.

    So, while at work I now have a small BT keyboard for typing on the phone. The rest of the time I silently howl in agony when I have to use the software keyboard.

    • Zizy
    • 8 months ago

    Switched a year and a half ago from Lumia 640 with a broken screen. Wow is that phone snappy and I can finally try whatever games (not that Lumia 640 was lacking games, it lacked performance for many). But oh man I miss my tiles so, and I can’t use Outlook contacts because the stupid thingy demands some Google account or something, even though it should work. Oh well, I will manage somehow and I mostly got used to the phone.

    But then… FUCKING WEATHER APP DEMANDS ACCESS TO PHONE CALLS ??!?!?!? How is that bullshit even legal?

    After that Android phone got broken screen (falling from half a meter on carpet), I was back on Lumia 640. Everything is slow again, but it works. Mostly. Until that broken screen finally gave up the ghost too.

    Back on Android, repaired screen sucks but works. Can’t wait for the first opportunity to get the hell of it again though. Except there is nowhere to run.

    Well, at least I have apps. Fewer than before and they crash more often, but oh well.

    • BorgOvermind
    • 8 months ago

    Reminds me of … USA.

    Denial
    No, Gov’ didn’t do 9.11.

    Anger
    Oh, s*** how could they do such a thing ?

    Bargaining
    Maybe if I’ll stay under the radar I’ll be out of big bro’s focus.

    Depression
    Oh no…they really spy on everyone and they can even count my cat’s number of fur hairs from satellites.

    Acceptance
    There’s nothing I can do. I have facebook. I’m a registered surrendered slave.

    • kodygaylord
    • 8 months ago

    Yes, Windows phones are dead now and you can tell the same about the old simple phone which we use for calling purpose only as there are new trends and [b<]advancements[/b<] always coming with emerging technologies in [url=https://www.tatvasoft.com.au<]mobile app development.[/url<]

    • kodygaylord
    • 8 months ago

    Yes, Windows phones are dead now and you can tell the same about the old simple phone which we use for calling purpose only as there are new trends and [b<]advancements[/b<] always coming with emerging technologies in [url=https://www.tatvasoft.com.au<]mobile app development.[/url<]

    • Ummagumma
    • 8 months ago

    When I read through this article all I could think to tell Colin is this:

    “Suck it up buttercup!”

    • End User
    • 8 months ago

    LET IT GO ALREADY!!!!!!

    IT WAS BAD ENOUGH WHEN IT LIVED!!!!

    • bandannaman
    • 8 months ago

    [quote<]Ports ... USB 2.0 ... [/quote<] wut

    • Bomber
    • 8 months ago

    My first foray into smart phones was this, an [url=https://www.phonescoop.com/phones/phone.php?p=146<]Audiovox Thera[/url<] circa 2003. Intel ARM 200mhz and Windows CE in all it's glory. I moved from that to it's replacement on Verizon the Audivox XV6800 which was basically the same phone just faster and more storage. The after a stint with a Razr I got a hand me down Motorola Q from my mother in law. After that...iPhones. I tried Android, and as much as I liked the customization and all, I hated Android 4.x needing restarts. I wanted so hard, after all my old windows phones to give the Win8/10 phones a chance but by that time I was too deep into Apple ecosystem. Still it's sad that MS is giving up on the mobile space after so much time.

    • drfish
    • 8 months ago

    At the risk of looking like an even bigger idiot, would any of you gerbils with Android devices see if you can find any evidence that [url=https://www.thurrott.com/microsoft/156352/cortana-getting-ability-read-messages-aloud<]this feature[/url<] is actually part of Cortana on Android? I'm running Cortana 3.1.2 on my new phone and, unless I'm completely missing it, it doesn't seem like reading txts aloud made it out of the beta release from last year. My Google-fu is failing me, everyone talked about the feature as coming soon back in March/April of last year, but then nothing. :-/

      • DancinJack
      • 8 months ago

      Most recent update on Play store: [url<]https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.microsoft.cortana&hl=en_US[/url<] In the release notes it says: WHAT'S NEW Wake up Cortana by saying “Hey Cortana” or “Cortana” Ask Cortana to help with "Read my message" or "Do I have any new messages" Contextual suggestions to help you get related information for your questions I don't personally have a car (or a BT device near me) to test the "will it read my stuffs when they come in" but it did work properly when I told Cortana to "read my messages." 3.1.2.2437 on P2 XL Android 9 and up to date with security updates.

        • drfish
        • 8 months ago

        Thank you for helping with my sanity check!

        Do you see any evidence of the menu option of the first image [url=https://www.windowscentral.com/cortana-android-beta-can-now-read-your-incoming-texts-aloud<]here[/url<]? "Read incoming message aloud" It's close to a year old, and they may have changed plans, but for all the fanfare I found about the feature coming, I can't find anything about the feature getting toned down to just what is shared in the change log.

          • DancinJack
          • 8 months ago

          I do not. I joined the beta program to see if that will enable it, but the update hasn’t come yet.

            • drfish
            • 8 months ago

            I tried the beta as well, but never got anything other than 3.1.2, even after a few days. I concluded that the beta that added this feature was for 3.0 and that there’s not a beta running currently. Huh. Thanks again for checking into it.

            • DancinJack
            • 8 months ago

            Have you tried grabbing the APK from a mirror and seeing if that works? It’s definitely not ideal, and you’d have to refuse updates, but maybe that’s enough for you until you find another solution.

            [url<]https://www.apkmirror.com/apk/microsoft-corporation/cortana/[/url<]

            • drfish
            • 8 months ago

            I have not, but that looks like a great way to spend Friday night if I don’t figure out something else by then. 🙂

            • Walkintarget
            • 8 months ago

            It was a feature that never made it into the Android version. It will never make it into the Android version as well. I’m still very ticked off about it … wish I hadn’t revisited this thread to hear these damn fools telling me I am not smart enough to make it work on Samsung, or wrong for wanting it in the first place.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 months ago

            I like that you’re replying to a discussion on how to make it work to say it never made it in.

    • kvndoom
    • 8 months ago

    You go to this bleak place to see the true meaning of denial: [url<]https://forums.crackberry.com/blackberry-10-phones-os-f273/[/url<]

      • DancinJack
      • 8 months ago

      best post here, easily

    • DancinJack
    • 8 months ago

    It appears a lot of people that were on WP don’t really know how to use their Android (and less so iOS) devices to take full advantage of them yet. That’s OK, but please do a little research before posting huge wall of text rants that don’t really say anything other than “BAH ANDROID SUX IOS SUCKS WP FOR LYFE I WILL NOT CHANGE MY MIND EVEN THOUGH I’M WRONG ABOUT SOME STUFF.”

    That’s fine. It’s your prerogative. I just think your lives might be a bit easier if you checked out what you can actually do and resolved some of your issues with settings and apps available to you. Happy to help in any way I can.

      • Walkintarget
      • 8 months ago

      Oh great and wise one, care to tell me how my Samsung will read me my tests, hands-free ?? I patiently await your answer. *que Jeopardy theme*

        • DancinJack
        • 8 months ago

        I’m pretty sure multiple people already have?

    • DancinJack
    • 8 months ago

    The sheer amount of WP zealots that come out on this site always kind of amazes me.

    It’s time to move on, nerds. Get over it. It may be hard, but you have no choice if you actually want to use a device that gets any kind of security update.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 8 months ago

      Great post. +1

      Nerds don’t like to change. Look at W7 -> W10

      Can’t make the nerds happy.

        • DancinJack
        • 8 months ago

        thanks, bro

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 months ago

      Unnnhhhh
      “Windows 10 Mobile, version 1709 (released October 2017) is the last release of Windows 10 Mobile and Microsoft will end support on December 10, 2019”

      Wp is still getting security updates…

        • DancinJack
        • 8 months ago

        Apologies, I thought it was Feb. Not embarrassed to admit I was misinformed.

        I still don’t think that makes it that much better, but definitely some time left for the holdovers.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 months ago

          Happens to the best of us

          Also this

          [url<]https://9to5google.com/2018/04/12/android-security-update-missing-patches-report/[/url<]

            • DancinJack
            • 8 months ago

            Precisely why I won’t buy anything but Google if I’m doing Android. Even then, I’m pretty certain I’m moving to iOS this year. Google has done some truly awful things with Android lately, and I don’t really see it getting any better.

      • mganai
      • 8 months ago

      Yeah, an inferior, more fragmented OS (Android) won. Woo.

    • LostCat
    • 8 months ago

    WP10 phones were supported so long that even the ‘new’ Android still feels pathetic.

    Far better than it used to be at least, but still pushing me towards iOS now that I have work.

    • calawaydotcom
    • 8 months ago

    I had to register to this site after reading your diatribe just so that I could recognize your post with my appreciation.
    You did a wonderful job of expressing what I’ve been feeling since I have left the Windows Mobile platform. But unlike you, I have yet to reach the acceptance stage.
    I’ve been struggling with Android ever since I got my Samsung 9+. I strongly dislike it.
    I’ve also tried the Launcher 10, but it will take 20+ seconds to respond on my device. I’ve had to stick with the Microsoft launcher instead.
    And what the HECK is up with no spoken SMS??? Something that I took for granted isn’t even available on android. I miss it sorely.
    Also like you, I’ve never attempted the native assistant. Cortana has always treated me quite well. If I can just keep her mapped to the dedicated (don’t get me started) Bizby button…

    I could go on for quite a while, but I’m getting a little misty eyed at the thought of my 950 sitting dead in my desk drawer.

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      These are very complex emotions about a painful topic. I still feel a connection to each stage grief, even a growing anger over hands-free txting as it looks more and more fruitless.

      You’re among friends here, we can get through this together.

        • curtisb
        • 8 months ago

        I’m still holding onto my 950XL, but quickly realizing I’m going to have to do something soon. Any amount of “soon” is too soon, though. Unfortunately, the rest of my family is in the iOS ecosystem with a lot of already purchased apps, so I think that’s where I’m begrudgingly going to end up. I’m not excited about either of the prospects I have to choose from…

      • DancinJack
      • 8 months ago

      Uhhhh, what?

      Install this: [url<]https://www.apkmirror.com/apk/google-inc/pixel-launcher/pixel-launcher-9-5103388-release/[/url<] And what are you talking about no spoken SMS? Meaning Android doesn't read them back to you? I'm sure there are apps that will do what you want. Also lol at people using Cortana over Google Assistant.

      • Kretschmer
      • 8 months ago

      Samsung phones are terrible and seem to persist in marketshare due to good hardware, intertia, and massive amounts of marketing. Try an Android phone with a cleaner UI like a Nokia.

      Pixel phones are bad hardware with great software.
      Samsung phones are great hardware with bad software.

      As long as you don’t need a stellar camera I find the mid-range to be the sweet spot (e.g. Motos, Nokias, etc). Fairly stock Android without the poor design decisions of the flagships (goodbye headphone port; hello glass everywhere).

    • cygnus1
    • 8 months ago

    drfish, I have 2 Lumia 640’s you’re welcome to have. They’re gathering dust on shelf. Only ever used to compare/test Win10 Mobile to the Win8 Mobile they shipped with.

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      That’s very kind, thank you. I’m all set with the small army of Windows Phones I already have, though. Maybe I should frame them or something…

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        You should glue arms and legs to them and set up a diorama.

        • cygnus1
        • 8 months ago

        You have no idea how many people I’ve offered them to, lol. No one wants them. Literally can’t even give them away now. I just can’t bring myself to toss them though. I guess I’ll find some way to recycle them. Just so sad to see them get so little use.

    • dashbarron
    • 8 months ago

    This man carried the torch for me I no longer could. I had a series of phones and got them for my groupies, but couldn’t keep it going. The Lumia’s were ahead of Apple & any Android phone and I enjoyed the software, minus the lack of app awareness.

    Had to finally jump to a OnePlus, which I’ve been enjoying.

    We were brothers once Fish. Now we’re merely strangers who nod at each other walking down the street.

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      There must be something in my eye…

    • Anovoca
    • 8 months ago

    Windows Phone died for me one fateful laundry day……

    • Judicator
    • 8 months ago

    Bought an used 950XL two weeks ago to replace my Lumia 620 and I love every bit of it.
    I knew the windows phone GUIs for Android but in the end I got a good phone for the price of a low end new Android one.

    • null0byte
    • 8 months ago

    I saw it name dropped elsewhere in the comments but the KiN….brings back nightmares of that phone, and a little-recognized reason as to why Windows Phone stumbles so badly out of the gate (among all the other reasons).

      • Usacomp2k3
      • 8 months ago

      Kin was the best option back in the day when a smartphone plan added an instant $35 to your phone bill.

        • null0byte
        • 8 months ago

        I’m not denying that, but Microsoft seriously screwed over Danger after they bought them and completely mismanaged the whole thing. If they had let Danger just make a new and improved Sidekick, and *not* been a nightmare trying to work with in supporting the device and service, it could have been so much more.

        The ridiculous corporate infighting between the Danger team and the team that was working on what eventually became Windows Phone just served to delay both, and KiN ended up being rushed out the door in an unfinished state.

          • Usacomp2k3
          • 8 months ago

          I won’t disagree with that.

    • Walkintarget
    • 8 months ago

    I still own 2 WPs – a Nokia Lumia 920 (my DD for YEARS until my G.D. boss forced me to upgrade to a Samsung so he could manage it). Had I known how bad the Samsung was – removing my favorite feature of the WP that no other phone still does cleanly … HANDS FREE TEXTING – I would have actively put up a real fight over the switch.

    I also purchased a Lumia 640 from Best Buy during the blowout days for $30 (Walgreens was selling them for $7 in some locations). I ended up upgrading that to Win10 so that I had 2 phones with 2 OSes on them, so all bases were covered. Did I mention my HANDS FREE TEXTING ??? And how it just WORKED ??!? Just making sure to point this out.

    So, what did the Samsung J7 P.O.S. that I was [i<]blessed[/i<] with do for me ?? Well, text to speech no longer works. It only takes calls, not texts. Guess what I cannot get my wife to do while I am driving on a long trip ?? CALL ME INSTEAD OF TEXTING ME !! Ohh, but I now had access to APPS !! Taco Bell, banking apps, Redbox ... a whole new world of apps to install !! No .. no .. I just want a gawdamn phone .. oh, and did I mention I want it to cleanly support HANDS FREE TEXT TO SPEECH ?!? Cortana: You have a text from _________ *reads me text msg* Cortana: Do you wish to reply or are you done ? Me: Reply Cortana: OK, go ahead and say what you want me to send Me: Blah blah blah I LOVE HANDS FREE TEXTING !!!! Cortana: Do you wish to send it or add more ?? Me: SEND ME Jesus H. Christ ... I cannot tell you how much I miss this one singular feature that became my favorite feature in a 24k SUV that I bought .... all of those fancy doodads in it - heated seats, VENTILATED seats, heated steering wheel, UConnect stereo with a 40GB HDD to store my music, DVD player for the 2nd row, a freakin' 360hp HEMI ... and the one .. thing .. I loved the most was that .... yesss ... HANDS FREE TEXTING !!! So here I sit with two wonderful phones, both work the way I want them to for my usage. But NoOOooOooooo, I have to use a lower end Samsung J7 POS that doesn't function for the most important feature that I DEMAND from my phone .. no, I am not going to repeat myself again, you know what I am going to say. And yes, I HAVE researched it. Cortana is the key. My crappy J7 does not offer Bixby, which does a rudimentary job of emulating Cortana, but it needs to be used in Bluetooth mode to accept text messages. We no longer have any cheaper phones to purchase due to the subsidies getting yanked, so even if I FOUND A higher end Samsung to (sorta) do what I want, I'd pay $600+ to buy it, not .. ohh, say $30. Do I sound BITTER ?? Am I angry at MS ?? *kicks nearest dog sitting near me* DAMN RIGHT I AM !! MS did a better job at taking a massive shit on their mobile division like nothing I have EVER witnessed before !! I thought nobody could EVER screw up an acquisition like HP when they purchased Palm for 1.2 BILLION *insert Austin Powers meme here* ... and they promptly pissed it away in 49 days (!!! holy s*$#) and sold it for pennies on the dollar to LG. Web OS was pretty much my favorite mobile OS - what a goddamned charming OS to use on a tablet. But when its all said and done, MS may just top HP on pissing away a technology with this one. I am sure you guys are satisfied with just 2 players in the market. Let's just ditch Samsung, why don't we ?? We don't need 2 players in the market !!? Everyone can have an Iphone now !! Yes, we DO need more than 2 players in the mobile market. Without AMD, you'd be paying Intel a shit-ton of $ to buy a new board or chip. Without AMD, Nvidia would be charging $1,000+ for a top end graphi ... errr. nevermind. We NEED another option in the mobile sector. MS just is not worthy of that third player status. I am supremely pissed about this ... but there's nothing I can do. I am very tempted to take the SIM out of my Samsung and pop it into my unlocked WP 640 and not tell the boss. Yes, this thread triggered me ... I used to be one of WP's biggest fans. And no, there isn't an easy fix for me. Once again, MS takes something that just worked for what its intended audience wanted and tosses it into the compost heap. I own a Windows Home Server, I run a HTPC running WMC as its frontend .. I have a real love/hate with MS. And I STILL cannot do HANDS FREE TEXTING !!! I feel like Charlie Brown trying to kick that goddamned football.

      • derFunkenstein
      • 8 months ago

      Wall of text hits you for 4,096 damage. You die.

        • Walkintarget
        • 8 months ago

        I have never been so ticked off discussing a topic in my life. I don’t care if its TL;DR … I personally needed to vent. At least it wasn’t done ALL IN CAPS, SSK style. It just grinds my gears that so many users never bothered to even see what WP offered, but seeing how it suffered and died oh so slowly, maybe that’s a good thing, so that there aren’t more of >> ME << out there, griping and bitching up a storm about its demise.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 months ago

          WHAT DO YOU MEAN “AT LEAST IT WASN’T ALL CAPS?!!?!?”

            • the
            • 8 months ago

            BUT CAN YOU ALL CAPS HANDS FREE?

        • Redocbew
        • 8 months ago

        They wouldn’t die. 4k is useless. Everyone knows that.

          • Srsly_Bro
          • 8 months ago

          We going round 2?

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 months ago

          #heyooo

        • Convert
        • 8 months ago

        I love you right now.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 months ago

          And I love you. Because I’ve learned that platonic love [url=https://getyarn.io/yarn-clip/902fb0fc-9edb-4fc4-953a-dfc09abc1f72<]can exist between two grown men[/url<].

        • Mr Bill
        • 8 months ago

        This wins the internet. To a former DOS Rogue, D&D, and WOW player; this is just darned funny.

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 months ago

          Definitely the vibe I was going for. 🙂

      • ronch
      • 8 months ago

      I’m feeling lazy today so I didn’t read your Great Wall of Text. Great job! Who funded it?

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      Bravo!

      I still don’t understand why Cortana isn’t reading me my texts in the car. It sounded like there was a beta feature that adding the ability to reply to texts back in October, but I signed up for the beta and I don’t even see the option to have her read me my txts. I need to get back to researching that. It’s my biggest problem with the setup right now.

      Freaking Microsoft, the great heart-breaker of technology.

      • YukaKun
      • 8 months ago

      Your comment is my favorite from 2019 so far, by a long shot.

      In all fairness, the Nokia N9 and Lumia 900 were great phones, but “no apps” really killed them when Whatsapp, Telegram and others were really taking off and have little to no WP support.

      I guess you don’t really need or want a history lesson when you already know how it went down, but I do agree WP was good, specially WP10’s latest version. I saw it running really smoothly in mid-range hardware (compared to Android) with no problems and it was very telling of all the polish MS had put into it from WP7+ over the years.

      Cheers!

      • mattshwink
      • 8 months ago

      Have you tried the Google Assistant? Just say “OK Google show me my last messages” It should read (up to the last 5) messages to you and let you reply by voice.

        • Walkintarget
        • 8 months ago

        For some reason, Google Assistant did not work on my phone. My boss suggested it when I first voiced my displeasure with this forced ‘upgrade’, but it did not work as advertised. I cannot remember why it didn’t work, but I know I tried it at some point.

      • Chrispy_
      • 8 months ago

      What are you on about?

      “Hey Google”
      [i<]Bing boop[/i<] "Send a message to Amy, I'm running ten minutes late, see you soon" [i<]Okay, I've sent a message to Amy "I'm running ten minutes late, see you soon"[/i<] or "Hey Google" [i<]Bing boop[/i<] "Send message to Amy using Whatsapp" [i<]Chat with Amy? Sure; What's the message?[/i<] "I'm running ten minutes late, see you soon" [i<]Got it. Do you want to change it or send it[/i<] "Send it." [i<]Sending...[/i<] Sorry, I didn't read any more of your text wall, because your rant started with an obvious mistake. Put your best foot forward, first impressions count, etc...

        • drfish
        • 8 months ago

        I’m about to give up on Cortana, even though this feature is apparently supposed to be in place.

        I can’t test this is my car right now, but you’re saying that if I use the Google Assistant and I get a text message in my car it will talk to me like, [i<]Text from Chuckula: "Something, something, Intel, something, something glue." Would you like to reply or ignore?[/i<] And I can say "reply" and then dictate my message? I know I can send texts, I just want confirmation that incoming messages will be read to me while driving using the default Google Assistant. Thanks!

          • DancinJack
          • 8 months ago

          Yes and no. You’d have to tell Assistant to read them, but it will. When you get a text, just say “hey google – read my message(s)” or whatever. If you just want them read aloud as they come in, that’s a different story. You’d have to go third party for that.

          [url<]https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.hillman.out_loud&rdid=com.hillman.out_loud[/url<]

            • Usacomp2k3
            • 8 months ago

            Same with iOS. I hear the *ding* and I ask Siri to “read unread messages” and after reading “would you like to reply to that message”.

            • drfish
            • 8 months ago

            That’s what I was reading elsewhere. Thanks for clarifying. I think a lot of the angst over this issue is simply because Microsoft [i<]nailed[/i<] this feature way back in 2014 and WP fans have just taken it for granted. I know I assumed this would be a complete non-issue for Android. The real mystery now is why this was hyped up as a feature Cortana would get on Android early last year and appears to have been completely forgotten.

            • DancinJack
            • 8 months ago

            Android Auto should work for this too, possibly without asking it to? I don’t have a car so I can’t be certain.

            [url<]https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.google.android.projection.gearhead&hl=en_US[/url<]

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            android auto doesn’t automatically, at least it doesn’t on my Oneplus 5t, and gosh, does that app ever suck.

            • MrDweezil
            • 8 months ago

            I use this all the time on Android Auto on a Oneplus 5. Didn’t have to set anything up, it just worked. I’m using Google’s “Messages” app for texts though, so that might matter if you’re using something else.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            i do use textra, so might be the reason.

            • DancinJack
            • 8 months ago

            That’s almost surely the reason, but it’s still dumb.

      • geniekid
      • 8 months ago

      Please. There was no need to kick that dog.

    • LoneWolf15
    • 8 months ago

    In front of me, I have a Microsoft Lumia 640 LTE. It is currently installing the February security update for Windows 10 Mobile 1709. Monthly updates are like clockwork; wish that could be said across the board on all Android phones.

    I’m not using it as a daily driver. But Windows Phone is probably the thing I’ve been most impressed with from Microsoft in the last five years, and it’s a failure. This is kind of sad. This platform is where Tiles and Cortana make sense. This device is perhaps spartan, but well-constructed, with a headphone jack, microSD card slot, replaceable battery, and a very reasonable quality screen. I bought it for forty bucks at the end of WinMo phone sales, and it works. Well, even. It’s still perfect for people who don’t have need of a lot of extra apps, although there’s a beta of Slack, and Snapchat works, and I have a third-party Reddit client that’s actually decent.
    It took Microsoft too long to make a good go of it; but it’s a shame because the final product is simple and does its job. I’ll keep it as a reminder.

    • NovusBogus
    • 8 months ago

    I had a WP7 device back when I was a .NET developer. Decent phone, and one of the few that shipped with an OEM backdoor to let me sideload my own apps to my own phone (which is why I chose it). Saying that should give at least some indication of how exactly it was that the developers-developers-developers company managed to so totally screw up its attempts to expand the Windows world beyond the PC…

    • Pville_Piper
    • 8 months ago

    I still have my Nokia 1520… it’s dying, slowly, it can’t last long… I can’t stand IPhones and the security issues with Android make me not want them.

    All I can say to Satya is fu… When he questioned whether the world need 3 phone OS I thought to myself, what if Sam Walton asked what do we need Walmart for? I mean, we have Sears, Kmart and J.C pennies! Does the world need another choice?

    • DarkUltra
    • 8 months ago

    If you have a high performing Android phone, I reccommend Rainpaper. Beautiful raindrops on your background.

    [url<]https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.oftn.rainpaper[/url<]

      • Voldenuit
      • 8 months ago

      I live in Seattle, I get that for free.

        • Srsly_Bro
        • 8 months ago

        We also got lots of snow. I want some rain again. I’m in downtown working. Sup?

    • EzioAs
    • 8 months ago

    I just switched to an Android phone last week. Coming from a Lumia 830 to a Nokia 6.1 (Android One). It’s been pretty good so far but I can’t believe people keep faulting MS as some sort of a leader in spying and advertising personal information with W10 when Google seems far worse. The first 2 days of me using the Android phone is filled with intrusive popups to keep giving Google my usage information.

    • Usacomp2k3
    • 8 months ago

    No Kin on your list? For shame.
    BTW, when do we get the 5 stages of WHS and the 5 stages of Zune?
    We were a MS household through-and-through in 2008. Xbox+MCE+WHS+Zune+Kin. It worked together fantastically. Alas, Microsoft really screwed the pooch on that one.

    • Sargent Duck
    • 8 months ago

    Happily typing this out on my Nokia 930. I love this phone and the interface. When this finally dies *sniff * I’ll go Android simply because it’s not Apple but I find it clunky.

    My previous phone was aN LG windows 7 keyboard slider phone.

    • crystall
    • 8 months ago

    As time goes by I found myself having less and less apps on my phone. There’s plenty of stuff that I only use occasionally and I can do away with just using the corresponding web interface via the browser. That includes notoriously annoying social media apps. That has the added bonus that you don’t have to turn off notifications and the like: they’re not there in the first place.

    • tipoo
    • 8 months ago

    [quote<]Can you Android people explain why your silly OS complains to me about memory all the time? My KEY2 LE has 4 GB of RAM, but apparently Android is incapable of managing it without my help. What's up with that? [/quote<] Yet for time immemorial, people will compare RAM across different OSs, particularly with Android and iOS it doesn't make sense. This isn't a thing on iOS devices with 2GB. 1GB ones are a little reload-ey but don't bug the user for it. Twice the RAM across different systems != half the swapping, in fact it doesn't guarantee there won't be more, as there is here.

      • DancinJack
      • 8 months ago

      Not only across OSs, but even across different OEMs inside of Android it can be wildly different. I have never, not once, had my Pixel 2 bug me about RAM.

      Completely depends on the software implementation in Android world, and unfortunately Android (and everything OEMs put on top of it) can require a big pool of RAM to be really snappy.

        • tipoo
        • 8 months ago

        True, Samsung was notoriously worse than even some mid range phones for years.

      • Froz
      • 8 months ago

      Honestly I have never had Android phone that complained about RAM. Yeah, I had Android phones that clearly had not enough RAM and would slow down at times, but they would in general handle it on their own, at least maybe some very old versions.

      I’m not on a native Android now, so I can’t tell for sure, but I’m surprised he had such notifications.

      Regardless of all above – yes, Android likes more RAM, you are right.

        • cheesyking
        • 7 months ago

        Agreed, never seen an android device saying it has run out of ram.

        Maybe he’s confused ram for storage? Modern android is constantly offering to “free up xMB of space” because of “smart storage”

    • tipoo
    • 8 months ago

    I distinctly recall that a phone like the Key2 was what was being screamed at Blackberry that it would have saved them, some 8 years ago. Blackberry hardware and physical keyboard, Android, and BB services on top.

    But nooo, it took them all but dying and licencing out their logo to TCL to get that phone (though by the way, Blackberry the OG company appears to have turned its finances around and is focusing on software, QNX/automotive).

    Another thing! Palm is now under the TCL umbrella too, that WebOS on Blackberry hardware idea was another thing people would have wanted, though in that case WebOS lives with LG…

    Sigh, what could have been for both of them.

    • f0d
    • 8 months ago

    sort of related….
    now that nokia isnt windows os and is using android im actually looking forward to getting one soon (probably the 6.2) because of android one
    i like the idea of an almost clean slate all goog software phone without all the crap software companys like samsung and lg and as far as i can tell and experienced every android manufacturer gives you
    they also seem to give you a lot for your dollar – to me the “new” nokia seem to have amazing phones for the prices they are selling them at

      • mattshwink
      • 8 months ago

      While a little more expensive (~ $200) but cheaper than flagships without the bloat I really love my one plus 6T.

      • Taxythingy
      • 8 months ago

      I can recommend the Nokia phones. I switched from multiple Windows Phones to a Nokia 7+ and I’m very happy. It’s a little on the big side for most people, but it works for me. System updates roughly every two months. Android Pie upgrade within 2.5 months of release, possibly quicker.

      The biggest gripes are to do with Android, not the phone. Mostly, it’s that notifications are challenging to beat into submission. But we’re quickly into the little things, and there’s a lot that is better than Windows Phone.

    • Chrispy_
    • 8 months ago

    Unpopular opinion warning:

    I actually think Microsoft would have succeeded if they’d stopped diluting both Windows Phone and Windows 8 to make it a one-size-fits-all product.

    Some of the problems that (still) plague Windows 10 are mobile-first features, and some of the things that ruined WP are lip service to the misguided efforts of a unified interface.

    Even now, in the era of 8″ phablets that have hardware better than some laptops, they are different tools with different input methods and different purposes. One size never fits and I’m a little sad that both WP was killed off, and that Windows as an OS is still lumbered with stuff designed for phones.

    Microsoft are utterly incapable of starting from a clean slate, so those mistakes will continue to plauge PCs and laptops for decades to come.

      • sweatshopking
      • 8 months ago

      I think ms needs to do some things with their os, but the direction is clearly moving towards hybrids. Windows 10 works quite well on a surface or similar design. In a few more years when wireless screen casting at high speeds is a thing we will all be carrying around devices which are mobile when needed and not when needed. That’s where MS is trying to get.

        • Redocbew
        • 8 months ago

        If Microsoft can figure out how to make touchscreens not suck for all the things that people still need a desktop PC to do that’d be pretty cool, but that’s not about performance, and I’m not sure it’s a problem our current technology can solve.

        My first thought when it became clear that Microsoft was attempting the one-size-fits-all thing was that it was impossible to do that when you don’t control both the hardware and software like a certain fruit company. However, Microsoft has been dealing with that problem for decades, and like Chrispy said it’s really in the UI where things start to fall apart. You can fit a square peg in a round hole if you push hard enough, but it doesn’t work very well.

          • ermo
          • 8 months ago

          Re. having a fully integrated vertical stack for hybrids:

          I could be wrong, but I think the Surface line was about doing things right internally and then showing the surrounding ecosystem what an integrated premium Windows experience can be.

          I’d argue that this approach has worked beautifully for MS. Surface is now a household name for hybrids to the point where Apple felt the need to “innovate” with the IPad Pro.

            • Usacomp2k3
            • 8 months ago

            Agreed. If they had done the same thing with Phone’s, WP/WM may still be around.

      • blastdoor
      • 8 months ago

      I mostly agree — different UI for different devices.

      One caveat, though, is that I think Apple might be too rigid in insisting that touchscreens don’t make sense on Macs. I think touchscreens make as much sense for a Mac as a physical keyboard makes for an iPad, which is to say — it sometimes does make sense. I don’t use a physical keyboard on my iPad a whole lot, but I do sometimes use it and would miss it if it weren’t there. Similarly, I do miss not having a touchscreen on my Mac, even though my usage of it would be limited if it were there. One thing’s for sure — a touchscreen on a Mac would be more useful than the Touch Bar! Perhaps the way for apple to thread that needle would be to add Pencil support o the Mac, but not finger-touch support….

      • Arbiter Odie
      • 8 months ago

      Opinion warning:

      All they had to do was not pull the plug. That alone would have been enough to beat android.

    • not_a_gerbil
    • 8 months ago

    I’d been wishing for a physical keyboard on modern phones for years until just a few weeks ago when someone pointed out that swype style typing is faster and more accurate. I realized that they were right. I’d been using a better data input method for years while nostalgia blinded me.

      • cynan
      • 8 months ago

      Wut?
      Swipe-typing faster than directly touching the letters? Sure, a keyboard with good prediction such as gboard will make swiping pretty quick – but then there is also prediction for regular typing (which saves having to type entire words).

      Color me unconvinced. After all, if swiping was so much more efficient, why aren’t we all sitting in front of large swipe tablets at our desks?

        • morphine
        • 8 months ago

        The use case in question is in a phone/tablet, specifically, not against a full-sized keyboard.

          • cynan
          • 8 months ago

          Yes. Hyperbole for emphasis for the lose.

          The only way swiping could be faster than typing is if you were using a phone with a small screen, negatively impacting accuracy sufficiently, or if the prediction on swipe keyboard modes was better than that on non-swipe modes. However, there is no modality-relevant reason for there to be a difference prediction accuracy. So if this is the case, the fact that swipe might be faster is a temporary artifact.

          As far as the screen real estate issue, I have fairly large hands, though use plus size phones (i.e., 5.5-6″) and given using keyboards on phones of that size (in portrait mode) I will remain skeptical that swipe is inherently faster (differences in prediction efficacy across keyboards aside).

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        Wouldn’t surprise me, at least compared to the tiny keyboards on older phones. I can Swype pretty darn quickly.

    • Goty
    • 8 months ago

    Re: Podcast apps, you should check out Podcast Addict. It’s a little clunky in the actual app, but once you’ve subscribed to your desired podcasts and set up things like how many episodes to keep at a time and when to automatically delete them, you basically only need to interact with the single-button widget to refresh the list and automatically download any new episodes. I hit that button while I’m getting ready for work in the morning and my podcasts are always up to date by the time I get in the car.

      • thedosbox
      • 8 months ago

      Another alternative is Pocket Casts. It too allows fine-gain control over what to automatically download, whether to do so over wi-fi or immediately, and when to delete episodes.

      It also has android auto support.

        • DancinJack
        • 8 months ago

        Yup, if you’re going to use anything other than your primary music app (say, Spotify), then you should be using Pocket Casts. It’s easily the best standalone podcast app on Android. Easily.

        • Goty
        • 8 months ago

        Podcast Addict also has Android Auto support, but most importantly, it’s FREE! I was going to try Pocket Casts for a week or two based on your suggestion, but I can’t see spending $4 on it when I don’t have any real issues with Podcast Addict.

          • thedosbox
          • 8 months ago

          The removal of ads is enough of a reason for me.

            • Goty
            • 8 months ago

            Fair point, though you do have the option of paying $3 to remove the one ad in the app (a small banner ad at the bottom of the screen.)

    • chuckula
    • 8 months ago

    Which stage is SSK in right now?

      • drfish
      • 8 months ago

      It’s complicated.

        • chuckula
        • 8 months ago

        The stages of SSK exist in a complex-valued state space?

        I should have expected it.

        SSK is not BIBO stable.

          • sweatshopking
          • 8 months ago

          WELL, I do use a oneplus 5t, but only after my 950xl died and I couldnt justify the replacement. I also use launcher 10, with a hot picture of my wife in her bikini during our 3 month stay in Cuba as the background. That helps take the sadness away.
          There are so many things WP did right, and I really think the failure was due to Ms not investing and the general perception of Microsoft at the time. Google was cooler and they were quicker to compete.

          As for my general mood, I’m slowly slogging through my degree, suffering through statistics, which is hard work for my brain and takes me ten hours to do 20 minutes of work. So, thankfully Seth and Adam understand why I’m not writing 247 for tr.

            • drfish
            • 8 months ago

            YOU KNEW ABOUT LAUNCHER 10 AND DIDN’T TELL ME SOONER???

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            Well, you didn’t mention you needed a consistent launcher.

            Also, I WANT TO RUIN YOUR LIFE FOR FUN

            • ermo
            • 8 months ago

            Misery begets misery?

            • blastdoor
            • 8 months ago

            Google also gave it away for “free”.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            yeah, i think the license fees disappearing was too little too late. WP should have been free from the beginning.

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 8 months ago

      Mourning stage. I’ll check on him later.

      • albundy
      • 8 months ago

      The way in which you ask that makes me think you don’t think it’s a very good idea.

    • Voldenuit
    • 8 months ago

    Microsoft mismanaged every aspect of Windows Phone, from the software APIs, to developer relations, app support, backwards compatibility, carrier deals, OEM relations, upgrade path and hardware and SoC support.
    That they burned nokia to the ground to do so is just more salt in the wound.

      • blastdoor
      • 8 months ago

      It really was an amazingly colossal failure. Microsoft is to mobile what Hillary Clinton is to presidential politics.

      • BabelHuber
      • 8 months ago

      So true.

      But don’t forget Nokia’s CEO Stephen Elop, probably one of the worst CEOs ever.

      [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Osborne_effect/<]Wikipedia's Osborne Effect page says:[/url<] [quote<]Another example of the Osborne Effect took place as a result of Nokia CEO Stephen Elop's implementation of the plan to shift away from Symbian to Windows Phone for its mobile software platform. On top of this, criticism of existing products was compared to the Ratner Effect. These two together led to the coining of the term "Elop Effect", to describe the combination of both premature announcement and negative comments on existing products.[/quote<]

        • Spunjji
        • 8 months ago

        He is underrated in that regard. He really did the worst possible decisions, in the worst possible order, at the worst possible time for his company. What a guy.

    • derFunkenstein
    • 8 months ago

    Windows Phone was my first modern attempt at programming, back when Microsoft started making Visual Studio Community edition in an effort to get people to pick up the platform. I didn’t have much capacity for breaking down logic at the time. Most of what I wrote only half-worked the way I envisioned. There were a lot of walls to break down inside my brain, and over time I got better and better with it.

    In early 2015, I made this app that sounded useful at the time but probably isn’t. The idea was to record meetings. You could make yourself a roster, create instances of the meeting, mark people from the roster present, keep notes on the meeting, and if you had contact info for people on the roster, you could email those notes. I thought it was cool but in the end I guess it doesn’t really serve much practical use. Who wants to keep meeting notes on a phone?

    Anyway, I showed it to my boss. He was pretty impressed, considering I was self-taught in the ways of C# and XAML. Turns out, my division was about to start a mobile app: parents could look at their kids’ grades, attendance, schedule, etc from their phones instead of using the legacy parent portal on their PCs. They didn’t want to throw any full-time dev resources at it from within the division, so they borrowed a guy probably about the same time as I started on my personal project. That fall, they were to a point where they needed to let this guy go back to his own stuff, and they still didn’t want to throw any “real” devs at it. So my boss thought of me. His cohort thought he was nuts, but it was a relatively low-priority project. If it stalled because I failed, no big deal. I was a team of one on a mission of what was perceived to be low importance.

    But it didn’t fail. Fast forward to today and that little mobile app is my company’s most-used app by a wide margin, and also the highest-rated one on Google Play (not that it’s rated that highly, because a parent will give it a 1-star rating because their school district doesn’t grant access to an area that the app can absolutely use). My experience prompted me to go back to school for the nth time, and this time I finished my degree. Today, more parents and students log into the system to see their kids’ data using the phone than use a desktop browser. It’s by far my greatest work-related accomplishment, which shows how little I’ve accomplished in my career (lol).

    That all stemmed out of a little self-motivation and hard work using tools that were free and easy at the time. So if not for Windows Phone, I would not be where I am today. Thanks, Microsoft.

      • shaq_mobile
      • 8 months ago

      Hey that’s a pretty cool story man. 🙂

      Only thing a Windows phone ever did for me is make me buy an s3.

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        That’s fair. I didn’t use it as my primary phone or anything. I got a 2012 flagship in 2014 for like $100 on eBay or something.

      • Blink
      • 8 months ago

      That’s an awesome experience. I loved my Windows phones. My Lumia 810, my favorite phone ever, is still my sturdy reliable backup phone!

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        I’ve still got my Lumia 925 in a drawer somewhere, I think. It might even still have this thing installed.

        edit: whoever gave you -1 on your post is peak internet in 2019. 😆

      • chuckula
      • 8 months ago

      [quote<]Windows Phone was my first modern attempt at programming, [/quote<] Holy crap make Microsoft pay for your therapy sessions!

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        Prior to that, in the early 1990s, I took a programming class in high school taught using Borland Turbo Pascal for DOS. If I could do that (poorly) I can do anything (poorly).

          • chuckula
          • 8 months ago

          I remember doing Pascal on the notorious model 25 IBM terminals in high school.. and we thought it was a major step up after having been forced to use BASIC.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 months ago

            I had to Google it and I’m still not sure, but those look like same systems we had. Of course, IBM used that basic model for a long time. I think ours had 80286 CPUs.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            #oldpeoplestories

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 months ago

            not all of us can live on the beach with our hot young wives, man.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            You sure about that? Seems like more people could. A lot of Cuba’s beaches are pretty empty.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 months ago

            It’s kind of expensive to get there from here. Minimum $700 per person plus I don’t have a passport.

            edit: and I do gotta work. 😆

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            we paid $320 CAD return per person. Can you even go to cuba on a USA passport right now?

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 months ago

            No idea. I figure I would have to go somewhere else (Canada, Mexico, the DR, whatever) and catch a connection. That’s what all of the flights I can find are.

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            It’s the usa government that prevents the travel, not Cuba, so that’d probably do it.

            • DancinJack
            • 8 months ago

            You can fly direct to Cuba from the US, just not from where Funk lives…

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            you can, but not for tourism.
            only for
            [quote<] Family visits Official business of the U.S. government, foreign governments, and certain intergovernmental organizations Journalistic activity Professional research and professional meetings Educational activities Religious activities Public performances, clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions Support for the Cuban people Humanitarian projects Activities of private foundations or research or educational institutes Exportation, importation, or transmission of information or information materials Certain export transactions that may be considered for authorization under existing regulations and guidelines [/quote<] or else it's criminal.

            • DancinJack
            • 8 months ago

            yeah it’d be super tough to fit your activities into one of those categories /s

            • sweatshopking
            • 8 months ago

            whether you can or not is irrelevant imo, “tourism” is illegal for americans.

            • derFunkenstein
            • 8 months ago

            I admit to not looking that hard, but no, it doesn’t seem they fly direct to Havana from Peoria International. 😆

          • curtisb
          • 8 months ago

          Ooof…every time I think I’ve put Turbo Pascal out of my mind it rears its ugly head again. Thanks (no really) for the memories…

          We did it on Commodore 64’s back in the day. Half a school year of BASIC, then the last half of the year was Turbo Pascal.

            • bandannaman
            • 8 months ago

            [quote<]rears its ugly head[/quote<] Compared to the rest of what was available at the time, it was a damned masterpiece.

        • Wirko
        • 8 months ago

        Um. dF healed MS from WP?

          • derFunkenstein
          • 8 months ago

          No he’s saying I need therapy. Maybe it’s stockholm syndrome or maybe it’s because I learned it first, but of all the OOP languages I’ve had to learn about over the last 3-4 years, C# wins because of the .NET class library and the syntax. I’ll admit that I’ve written A LOT more C# code than I have, say, Java, Kotlin, VB, or Swift.

      • DancinJack
      • 8 months ago

      cool story bro

        • derFunkenstein
        • 8 months ago

        Not as cool as the user reviews: [url<]https://twitter.com/TVsBen/status/1097961626869874689[/url<]

          • Spunjji
          • 8 months ago

          Truly brilliant

      • Srsly_Bro
      • 8 months ago

      Great story, bro. Thanks for sharing. It’s hard for many to learn something new where many claim to be “too busy” to allocate time to learning. You did it and that’s impressive.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This