Quieting a PC on the cheap

LIKE DAMAGE AND DISSONANCE, I TOO find myself turning into an old man when it comes to my tolerance of noise. Just the other day, I opened up my window and told those “young whippersnappers” out on the street to “turn down that racket.”

OK, that didn’t happen. But I’m definitely more bothered by the constant drone of a high-powered computer system than I used to be. Recently, I upgraded my system and removed a 760MPX board with dual Athlon MP 2000+ processors. I still had a use for this setup, so I put it into an Antec SX-630 enclosurewhich I had in reserve.

Unfortunately, it was loud. Very loud. Between the three 80mm fans (not counting the PSU fan), the Volcano 6Cu CPU coolers, and the fact that the SX-630 (unlike some of Antec’s newer cases) wasn’t really designed for quiet, it sounded like a large hive of bees had taken up residence in my office.

Something had to be done, but I didn’t want to blow a lot of money on the problem, money that could be better spent on… faster computer parts. I decided this would make an interesting experiment. How much could I improve the noise level of this case without shelling out a lot of cash? Read on and see.

Pinpointing the culprits
The first thing I wanted to do was get an idea of which components were generating the most noise. Cracking the case open, I gathered valuable information using the the highly advanced “touch the center of the fan until it stops” technique. I decided that, while the CPU fans were likely the majority of the problem, the case fans (one Antec included with the case, and two generic 80mm fans) weren’t exactly helping the situation.

Speaking of case fans, let’s talk about placement for a moment. On the SX-630, there are spots for two fans up front and one in the rear (again, not counting the PSU fan). One of the front fans mounts in the traditional spot near the bottom of the case, while another can be mounted in one of the 3.5″ drive cages to blow air across the drives.

Another thing to consider is the fan grills for the rear and lower front case fans. While these are great for keeping the appendages of small pets and children intact, they also reduce airflow and create turbulence and thus noise.

With my assessment of the problem complete, it was time to shop. Poking around online, I found a couple of Panaflo case fans and a couple of Copper Silent 2 TC CPU coolers. Yes, there are probably quieter fans and quieter CPU coolers, but recall the money limitations I set out earlier. I wound up spending just over $40, not counting shipping.



New and old heatsinks, top and bottom

As you can see, the Copper Silent 2 TC has a larger heatsink with more surface area, as well as a larger fan than the Volcano 6Cu. Additionally, the fan is temperature controlled, which will hopefully translate to slower rotational speeds and less noise.

Scalpel…
Once the parts arrived, it was time to begin the operation. I decided to do it in several steps. Some of these steps would consist of installing new parts, while others would involve modifying the existing configuration. At each step, I took readings with a sound level meter. From a foot away, I measured the noise level at the front, side and rear of the case.

After obtaining baseline measurements, I unplugged and removed the front fan that blew over the hard drive. Given the fact that nearly all 7200rpm hard drives do just fine without the benefit of a fan, I decided it just wasn’t necesary. One less fan is one less source of noise.

I mentioned earlier that the fan guards can create noise. For the sake of your fingers, it’s typically not a good idea to remove them, at least not without replacing them with a less-restrictive guard. In my case, however, the physical placement of the computer made it basically impossible for anyone to come in contact with the rear fan, and the front fans were covered by the front bezel. Out came the tinsnips…


Rear fan, before and after

I was surprised at how much removing the fan guards helped not only the noise but the airflow as well. In fact, I had to modify my testing procedures for the rear of the case, because the higher air velocity caused the sound level meter to read artificially high. From this point on, the rear sound level measurements were obtained by putting the meter above and behind the case, angled down towards the center of the back face.

Unfortunately, for obvious reasons I couldn’t take new “before” measurements from this new position, so be aware that the rear baseline measurements used slightly different methodology, and should therefore be taken with a grain of salt.

At this point, I took my second set of sound measurements. Next, I swapped out the two remaining fans for the Panaflo 80mm units, and took another set of measurements. Finally, it was time to install the new processor heatsinks.

Here, I hit upon a bit of a problem. It goes without saying that installing a heatsink the size of the Copper Silent 2 TC can be challenging in the best of circumstances. Additionally, while I can see the point behind them, the heatsink’s three hole retention clips make it absolute bear to install. The center hole is basically the same size as the plastic piece under which it fits, giving you absolutely no leeway in either direction. You must line the clip up as best you can, press down with great force and hope that you’re lined up. If not, back off and repeat ad nauseum.


Motherboard heatsink needed some persuading

The painful procedure I’ve just described was made worse by the fact that I was working on a dually board. Not only were there two heatsinks to install, but the component density on this particular board made for more than double the pleasure, double the fun. In particular, a finned heatsink glued to one of the voltage regulators interfered ever so slightly with one of the Arctic Cooling heatsinks. I wound up using a pair of vise grips to pinch the fins together on the voltage regulator heatsink. That and a few dozen curse words was sufficient to get the second CPU heatsink installed.

Here, I took a fourth set of measurements. However, these measurements were taken with the system at idle. Because the Arctic Cooling fans are temperature sensitive, I decided to take one more set of measurements after running Folding clients on each CPU for a half hour or so. I figured that would make for a good “worst case” scenario.

The results
So the bottom line is, was it worth it? Man, after all that I hope so. Let’s take a look.

First off, note that I colored the rear measurement for the stock configuration a different color, as a reminder that I changed my methodology for subsequent measurements. Looking at the results, it’s clear that each step along the way helped some, though the biggest reduction (not surprisingly) came from the new CPU heatsinks.

As you can see, however, using the machine for Folding did push the noise level back up slightly. I assume that this is entirely the result of the CPU heatsink fans stepping up their rotational speed in response to the higher heat of the processors.

Subjectively, the before and after difference is substantial. Before, the drone emanating from the corner of my office was loud enough to be a distraction. Now, I only really notice the noise if I stop to listen for it, and that’s with the machine Folding 24/7.

Conclusions
Obviously, there are a million different ways to approach this problem, from the very cheap (modifying existing equipment without purchasing any new hardware) to the relatively expensive (rip out all the fans and build/install a water-cooling system). In my case, I tried to get the most bang for not very much buck, and I’m satisfied with the results.

In the course of this project, I came up with other things to try, such as stepping the fan voltages down to 7V or finding some type of foam or case lining to deaden the sound. In the end, I decided to stop here simply because I’m satisfied with the results. If you have a machine that makes more noise than you’d like, hopefully you can use some of these techniques to quiet things down without stealing too much cash from your all-important Video Card Upgrade Fund.

Comments closed
    • elmopuddy
    • 15 years ago

    I just moved my main rig into a Super-Lanboy.. nice and quiet, especially with the 2 120’s plugged into fan-only header of Truepower 550… the Q-Fan feature on Asus P4P800-DX is helpful too..

    I’ve used some Silent-X fans on my Aria, they work well too..

    I remember the Delta 60mm on my first oc’d Thunderbird.. I’d kill my self if I had to endure that kind of noise again

    EP

    • Wintermane
    • 15 years ago

    A realtively cheap method of cooling that was also quiet that a friend used was hooking up the pc to a 500 gallon aquarium via tubing and using the pc to heat the water;/ Course he alrady had the aqaurium so all he had to get was the water blocks and tubing and pump.

      • house
      • 15 years ago

      Depending on the fish, I’m not sure a PC would be enough to heat 500g. But it is a good idea and a very effiecient use of energy.

    • opinionated
    • 15 years ago

    silentpcreview.com has a lot of good information on quieting your computer.

    • RickB
    • 15 years ago

    Just a few thoughts for Andy and you all:

    -A long time ago I cut the fan grilles out of my case (I even took apart my power supply to cut that grille too). But then I read some stuff that made me worried about electromagnetic interference (EMI) getting out through the holes. I’ve got my tower on top of the desk next to my CRT monitor and at times I noticed some wierd “wavering” artifacts on the screen. So I put a set of the standard wire grilles on, and it seemed to reduce the artifacts, while not impacting temperatures or noise. Thoughts?

    -I might consider putting a very quiet (Panaflo L1A or PC Power & Cooling Silencer) fan back by the hard drives. I’ve read that many people feel that hard drives that run hot are more likely to develop bearing/motor noise as they age. Western Digital drives seem to be well known for getting noisier as they get older. I’ve got a WD1200JB and it’s the loudest, and by far the most annoying source of noise in my machine (as a previous poster noted, the high frequencies are more objectionable than low frequencies).

    I have used many of the techniques listed in this article on Overclockers.com:
    §[<http://www.overclockers.com/tips1099/<]§ I even built a P4 3.0ghz machine with a Radeon 9800Pro machine with that case and fan setup. It was very quiet; the loudest item was the retail P4 cooler. The hard drive was totally inaudible even during seeks and case fan noise was basically nonexistant. The thing about that case I really liked was the lower hard drive cage that puts the hard drive in the air path of the lower case fan so you don't need an additional fan to create more noise. There is an Antec case that uses 120mm fans with a similar setup, model number SLK3700AMB. In fact I like the idea so much I'm thinking about making a hard drive cradle similar to this: §[<http://www.overclockers.com/tips1108/<]§ I know that next time I build a complete system, I'll make sure the case has that style of hard drive cage, big fans, and grommet mounting for the fans and hard drives. -Rick

      • liquidsquid
      • 15 years ago

      Cutting out the grill could increase RFI a bit, but the wavering on your monitor would be caused by a magnetic field such as caused by an induction motor (room fans, fridges, etc.) but not by the PC. The problem is that a computer case is USELESS to block any frequencies over 100MHz. It may attenuate it a bit, but not very much. All it takes is one hole larger than 1/2 the wavelength of the frequency (wavelength = speed of light / frequency) and it looks like the metal case isn’t even there. Think of the CD drawer or a drive slot with the metal piece missing, or an empty PCI slot. Also note the lack of screws every inch or so to mount the cover on. That un-screwed thin slot will radiate RF as good as any antenna.

      If you are really anal, shove your PC in here, and that will shut it up.
      §[<http://www.ramseyelectronics.com/cgi-bin/commerce.exe?preadd=action&key=STE5000<]§ (we make and design these, that is why I know the PC box is not really even an RF shield, it is just enough to pass FCC part 15) So as far as removing the grill, it will have no noticable effect other than repositioning the field around the box a bit. If you are really worried, chop out the grill, and replace with some coarse brass or copper screen bent in a bowl shape to keep the screen at least 1/3 inch away from the fan blades, then solder it in place. It is the turbulence around obsticles close to the blades that makes the noise and reduces air movement efficiency. -LS

        • RickB
        • 15 years ago

        I think that box would be a bit of overkill for this application… Anyway, thanks for the info.

        -Rick

    • David Hunt
    • 15 years ago

    $30 Kamakaze Scythe HS/Fan on a Barton 2500 in a Lian Li PC-61 with stock fans. I can’t hear it with the sides on and it keeps my CPU at 39C under load.

    • BiffStroganoffsky
    • 15 years ago

    Noise cancelling headphones! ;p

    • Growler
    • 15 years ago

    Your SX-830 only had three fan spots? Mine has five, although only three are being used (two Papsts and one Panaflo). The biggest difference, to me, at least, was the SilenX power supply. My system is very quiet now.

      • Dr. Evil
      • 15 years ago

      Well, that’s what I get for relying on a fading memory. I was mistaken, the enclosure is actually an SX-630. I’ve updated the article and news post to reflect this.

      See, I told you I was an old man!

    • just brew it!
    • 15 years ago

    The Volcano 6 Cu sounds like a jet taking off. When I built my first Athlon XP system, I used a Volcano 6 Cu for about a week, then swapped it out for a Taisol because I couldn’t stand the racket. The Taisol was a big improvement.

    I eventually used the Volcano 6 Cu on my wife’s system, and got the noise level down to something reasonable by undervolting the fan.

    I can sympathize with the component placement issues on dually boards too. My Tyan Tiger MPX had a couple of capacitors that interfered slightly with the mounting of a pair of Thermalright SK-7 HSFs; the capacitors are pressed right up against the HSF. And I couldn’t go any larger than the SK-7, because the HSF for CPU #2 is already nearly touching the back of the AGP card.

      • liquidsquid
      • 15 years ago

      Be careful with the HS touching the capacitors. If the insulation on the capacitors wears though, you may wind up with a short circuit. If you can, slide a piece of tough plastic like a cutout from a disposable gladware lid between the heatsink and caps.

        • just brew it!
        • 15 years ago

        I am not too concerned about this, because:

        – I am pretty sure the metal “can” of the capacitor isn’t electrically connected to anything. I checked a couple of capacitors I have in my spare parts box with an ohmmeter, and the metal can (which is normally exposed on top of the capacitor) appears to be electrically insulated from both of the capacitor leads.

        – The heatsinks are not connected to anything else, i.e. they should be electrically “floating”.

        So even if the heatsink does manage to make electrical contact with the metal can of the capacitor, I believe that would be harmless.

          • Kurlon
          • 15 years ago

          Note, you alter the value of the cap if you have that metal shroud touch anything else metal. Even if you don’t get a brilliant spark and smoke show, you’re risking instability.

            • just brew it!
            • 15 years ago

            For a small-valued cap I suppose that could be an issue. But for the type of caps we’re talking about here — large electrolytic caps used for power rail bypass — it is a non-issue.

            Mobo bypass caps are typically 1000 microfarads or larger, with a +/- 20% tolerance. The additional capacitance of a 1 lb chunk of copper suspended inside a computer case is going to be minuscule by comparison — almost certainly well under a microfarad. Even if the metal-to-metal contact does result in a change of capacitance, the change will be at least a couple of orders of magnitude less than the manufacturer’s tolerance for the value of the capacitor!

          • liquidsquid
          • 15 years ago

          Normally the outter can is the “negative” terminal, and most designs in power supplies have this connected to ground so you wont see any voltage. Some capacitors do not use the metal can at all, it is unconnected, but others do to take advantage of the additional surface area it gives. I would be more concerned however of two different cans touching the heatsink at once. I really don’t know if the exposed silicon of the processor die and the heatsink actually make a electrical contact or not, Inever thought about that.

          I was just concerned that vibration of the fans may be enough to eventually wear through the coating of the capacitors.

            • just brew it!
            • 15 years ago

            q[<. I really don't know if the exposed silicon of the processor die and the heatsink actually make a electrical contact or not, Inever thought about that.<]q Y'know, I hadn't thought of that either. It does appear that the exposed surface of the die is somewhat conductive (I just checked with an ohmmeter).

    • liquidsquid
    • 15 years ago

    Suggestion for graphs on audio tests from a nimrod.

    Noise baseline should not be 0dB, but the ambient noise in the room with the computer off. All noise sources add together, and 0dB would suggest perfect silence, which there is no such thing.

    It would also expand the differences out by quite a bit making the changes more meaningful.

    Another useful thing to do would be to show the spectrum of the noise as low-frequency noise is usually not bothersome, but noise over 500Hz is very annoying. Reducing the higher frequency noise would be a priority. There is a lot of spectrum software and freeware out there using a sound card for the recording source.

    §[<http://www.dxzone.com/catalog/Software/Spectrum_analyzers/<]§ One last thing: Provide sound snips. Many fine folks aren't familiar with what level differences really mean when listed in dB, they can only guess. Otherwise fun, great article as usual. -LS

      • MagerValp
      • 15 years ago

      And shouldn’t the graphs be exponential, rather than linear?

        • just brew it!
        • 15 years ago

        No, decibel levels are already logarithmic, by definition. The graphs are fine.

        • liquidsquid
        • 15 years ago

        They are exponential, thus dB which is a log scale. Every 3dB is roughly twice the sound level. That is why referring to 0dB is meaningless unless you state 0dB as the background noise, and the reading you take as a differential to that background. The background noise will probably be about 20dB or so in a normal house with lawnmowers about and the fridge running.

        For example with RF signal levels, they are in dBm, meaning dB in reference to 1 mW power level. 0dB == 1mW. -140dBm is considered “in the dirt” or at the noise floor which is much like the ambient noise. In reality when his graphs are set at 0dB, is the 0dB the ambient noise, some unknown reference, or some accepted minimum volume level much like dBSPL @1W/1Meter with audio devices.

        In other words, to be “engineering correct” the peaks of the chart should be labeled dB above abient, and then they would be realistic when considering noise levels.

        Sorry to get “engineering” on you guys.

        -LS

    • tu2thepoo
    • 15 years ago

    a lot of cheaper cases have problems with resonance, too. i cut holes for two 120mm panaflos in my side panel, and they vibrate enough that when I have the panel screwed in, it resonates throughout the whole case. mounting them on rubber grommetts (cheap from the local hardware store) reduced most of the problem.

    I found that the PSU was the single loudest component when I started quieting my PC – going for a 400watt Coolmax power supply (a nice, hefty, 120mm-fan model) quieted the machine a LOT. On temp-controlled mode it’s barely audible, and at full speed it’s still quieter than my old 80mm Antec 300watt.

    • Evan_Frame
    • 15 years ago

    Has anyone ever put their finger in a fan by accident? I can see the fear but have you ever actually done it?

    Anyways my case (some generic thing) had easily more than 3 times as much metal as non-metal (air) covering the fan “openings” at the rear of the case. 3 times!! It was basically a couple small holes drilled so you could see the fan on the other side but not feel the air. Temps dropped ALOT* (*scientific term) after I took the jigsaw to it

      • JustAnEngineer
      • 15 years ago

      With a Panaflo-L, putting your finger in the fan would be unlikely to cause an injury. With a high-speed Delta or Vantec, you could be in for a trip to the emergency room. Do not try this at home with one of those high-speed monsters!

      Thee are bigger reasons to put some sort of guard on your fans. A five-pack of wire grills would be cheap, folks! You want to prevent cords from jamming the fan or being damaged by it. Besides the lack of cooling, the current draw to the stopped fan may cause additional problems.

      • tu2thepoo
      • 15 years ago

      accidentally jammed my finger into a 6800rpm 60mm delta when i had the “FASTER IS BETTER” bug. cut my finger pretty damn good.

      on a side note, i accidentally dropped something (forgot what, i think it was a pen) on a 120mm Panaflo running at full speed – the fan blade that hit it basically exploded. fun stuff!

        • 5150
        • 15 years ago

        My friend did that too! Practically cut off a small chunk of skin from his finger, broke the fan blades too.

      • bthylafh
      • 15 years ago

      It may not damage an adult finger, but if you’ve got curious little ones about…

        • PantherX
        • 15 years ago

        You’d be surprised. I’ve drawn blood and had large parts of fingernails taken off by these plastic CPU fans on multiple occasions… I’m a slow learner sometimes.

          • Norphy
          • 15 years ago

          I bought one of those 120mm Vantec “Stealth” fans (I use the quotes as it was as noisy as hell) and I managed to get my finger caught in it once. Despite it only spinning at 1500rpm it still took a chunk of my finger off :\

          It was at a LAN party too… I swore

            • just brew it!
            • 15 years ago

            My Vantec Stealth 80mm fans are decently quiet. Either the 120mm are very noisy in comparison, or you got a defective one.

            • Chrispy_
            • 15 years ago

            Meh, all your puny fingers are obviously substandard 🙂

            I inserted my finger into a running YSTech 80mm and it lost three blades. My finger hurt for a few minutes after that, but finger definately victorious.

    • MagerValp
    • 15 years ago

    This is how I keep my HD silent:

    §[<http://www.paradroid.net/album/2004-04-21_Silent%20HD/<]§ And yes, since someone always asks, temperature is fine and it hasn't showed any signs of overheating so far. It isn't any worse than stacking HDs on top of eachother in a case without any cooling, like people normally do.

      • danny e.
      • 15 years ago

      i really wouldnt recommend that.
      looks like a horrible set up.

      1.) hard drives typically arent the big noise makers.
      2.) i cant believe it stays cool like that
      3.) its going to vibrate and damage itself.

        • MagerValp
        • 15 years ago

        /[<1.) hard drives typically arent the big noise makers.<]/ After silencing the CPU, the HD was the loudest part. A very annoying whirr too. /[<2.) i cant believe it stays cool like that<]/ Believe it. I've opened it up, and it doesn't feel any hotter than usual. /[<3.) its going to vibrate and damage itself.<]/ That, I'll admit, is a real fear 🙂 But there's so much foam in the box that it's actually quite tight, and the box itself barely fits in the 5.25" bays, so it's pretty stable. And it's been running for months now without any signs of trouble. Time will tell 🙂

          • Anonymous Hamster
          • 15 years ago

          The best solution for me was to get a quieter hard drive (Seagate Barracuda ATA IV).

          Modern hard drives can be nearly inaudible. With fluid bearings and quiet seek modes, it’s the best solution.

      • indeego
      • 15 years ago

      How do you know temperature is fine? That foam and box will insulate that drive and it will eventually dieg{<.<}g stupid. I once encountered a system where the dude installing the drive hadn't bothered with screws, he had just taken the foam padding and shoved it between the drive cage and the drive. The drive had died within a monthg{<.<}g

    • Aphasia
    • 15 years ago

    And still, Antec has GOOD fan grills compared to alot of other cases ive had. But damn.

    Panaflos are worth it if they are anything like the Papsts i have in my case.
    Its funny though, if i have the case all alone it sounds noisy, which isnt really a wonder as i have… hmm, 8 fans(4 80mm papst – 12db and 18db), a antec truepower with 2 fans, at least 80mm, and then a stock intel cooler and the Sapphire radeon. The stock CPU cooler is by far the loudest, so ill probably exchanage that vs another big as sink + a 12 or 18db papst more. Still, if i put any music on, which i always do, even at a whisper level, that “noisy” case just disappears. And by “noise” i mean, annoying as long as there isnt any other sound in the room, if you have someone over and are talking, its just fine.

    Oh, anybody got a good LARGE sink that fits the normal bracket and dont have to be screwed through the motherboard. For Prescott 2.8GHz.

      • thorz
      • 15 years ago

      Agree, I have been using PAPST for over 3 years and they are definitely silent compared to others here in Europe. I control the noise during the hot days with the Vantec Nexus multifunction panel §[<http://www.vantecusa.com/product-peripheral.html#,<]§ the thing is really good and lets me monitor 3 different temps inside the case, CPU fan RPM plus the typical USB2 (2) and firewire (1) ports. I use the CPU heatsink/fan that came bundled with my Intel P4 Ghz (temperature controlled), when the thing starts to be loud (in the summer mostly) I turn down the "volume" of it manually until the fan is on the 3000 RPMs, or until the temp of the CPU reach the 50 C. I use a Lian Li case. Having the computer on the same table as the screen doesn't help, I will move the case to a new small table that I will get in some days (can put on it printer+scanner also and the PC case will have some shielding in there). When the PC is there it will be almost silent.

    • aristheo
    • 15 years ago

    The other thing to consider is to use a Zalman FanMate or one of those pyramid thingamabob. Would have been cheaper than buying a new hsf but the cooling would not have been as good.

    • HiggsBoson
    • 15 years ago

    Actually I’m going to go out and say that the bit with the fan grills was by far the most interesting thing done. That takes absolutely no time and money and it still dropped noise levels around 3dB. That’s insane. I should seriously consider doing that for myself behind my front bezel.

      • house
      • 15 years ago

      Yes, it never occured to me that so much noise could be coming from the air/grill interaction. I always thought all it would to is help airflow slightly. It’s definately in the works for me.

    • Koly
    • 15 years ago

    Andy, the higher noise levels when folding could be not only from the CPU HSF, but also from the PSU, these are mostly temperature controlled too. I use these HSF (though manually controlled) in several systems and they are able to keep a 2500+ Barton around 60C under load at 1500RPM. That’s virtually inaudible behind the PSU or hard drives. So my guess is that the PSU is the major source of noise increase under load, the fact that it occurs behind the case most supports this too. It would be interesting if you posted the temperatures and RPMs of the CPU HSF idle/load.

    • Rakhmaninov3
    • 15 years ago

    Unfortunately, for obvious reasons I couldn’t take new “before” measurements from this new position, so be aware that the rear baseline measurements used slightly different methodology, and should therefore be taken with a grain of salt.

    Hehe! For some reason this made me laugh heartily.

    Good article–I’m seriously considering just clipping off the fan guards at the back of my computer, too–this damn thing is insanely loud and I have a credit card to pay off over the summer, so I think I’ll give this cheapest of quiet-mods a shot. Thanks for the suggestion!

    • UberGerbil
    • 15 years ago

    But did you tell them to “get out of that JELLO tree!” ?

    • indeego
    • 15 years ago

    carpet. Lots of itg{<.<}g

      • Coredump
      • 15 years ago

      I will keep this short, and hopefully not derail the thread too much…

      But it was not long ago that these same “quiet loving PC folks” were ridiculing Mac Users for saying that a quiet computer was a cool thing to have. That it was an added benefit to have a fanless computer.

      Now, there may be plenty of other Apple/PC Sucks/Rocks (mix and match) topics, but Apple has long desired to keep computer noise to a minimum…. glad to see others are learning of the inherrent benefits.

      .
      edit: Oh, and please… I have not said anything about Apple innovating, creating, discovering, inventing, introducing, starting, uniquely, whatever, etc. etc a quiet/fanless computer. So please don’t attack on such issues. Thanks

        • indeego
        • 15 years ago

        So mac folks like Carpetland too? sweet. The linux shuttle users group I go to meets near the Quilted/Paisley sectionsg{<.<}g s[http://www.carpetlandusa.com/<]§ ) your head baloons beyond control of the rest of your body, I'm afraidg{<.<}g)<]s

        • muyuubyou
        • 15 years ago

        I only see one wrong in your post: “Apple has long desired to keep computer noise to a minimum…. glad to see others are learning of the inherrent benefits.”

        Others are not “learning” anything now. This is nothing new. Apple simply aims for the high end, where people actually dedicate some of the investment in “secondary” features. (“Secondary” as in “not in the specs people compare to buy computers”).

        • tu2thepoo
        • 15 years ago

        apple’s been doing quiet computers for a while, sure, but some of their high-end products are just as noisy as their PC counterparts. my friend’s powermac G4 (a dual-cpu tower) is anything but silent.

        their only true-blue silent PC was the G4 cube, and god help you if you accidentally left your textbooks on top of the vents.

        • Kurlon
        • 15 years ago

        To my knowledge, Apple hasn’t produced a fanless PC. What they did do right back in the early PPC days, and I wish others would follow, was use LARGE fans at low rpms. 120mm isn’t large, we’re talking 200mm or bigger. They could turn a nice, sedate, lazy rpm, move a volume of air, without much turbulence or noise. This was about the time Apple started it’s love affair with ‘dental’ plastic. That not quite transparent green textured plastic.

        Edit: Cube, forgot the cube… and that one has it’s own issues due to being fanless… so it’s not a 100% victory. I believe iMacs, new and old have one tiny fan for the PS last I looked.

      • mercid
      • 15 years ago

      Agreed.

      My PC-65 has all pabst and Vantec Whisper fans along with carpet on all sides, housed in the computer compartment in my desk. It doesnt make a noise if i set the hdd’s to power down after inactivity.

    • HowardDrake
    • 15 years ago

    Having had some of those Volcano 6’s in systems past, I’m not surprised you upgraded, just surprised you waited so long. It could have been worse, you could have had SuperOrbs cooling the CPUs 😀

      • highlandr
      • 15 years ago

      Now, SuperOrbs were the bee’s knees when they came out, but just the fact that you made that comment tels me you’ve had experience with them…

      (You can hear the one in my mom’s machine from across a noisy room.)

        • 5150
        • 15 years ago

        Heh, I have a Hedgehog (first copper HS out) and a Delta fan. It’s slightly loud. 😉

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